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Some friends are coming into town on Friday, and have already made group reservations at the Oceanaire restaurant. I usually like to BYOB.
I know whites are customarily paired with seafood, but my cellar is woefully understocked except for champagne and a few QPR sauv blancs.
It's a good bet not everyone will be ordering salmon (I love their mahi-mahi, myself), so a good pinot noir won't cover everything.
Any ideas?
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
tlily hit the nail on the head with #4!


Yeah, yeah, I know. It's just that I'm not a big chardonnay fan, and really good white burgundys are scarce in these parts. But I just remembered that I have a bottle of that '04 St.-Urbans-Hof Riesling that made the top 100 list. I haven't tried it yet, would that do?
We usually do order a 1/1 ratio of bottles off the restaurant list, unless it's dismal, but Oceanaire's list is pretty good from what I remember.
quote:
Originally posted by Flubis:
I say Grenache. It will pair well with most fish unless there is a cream sauce. I have paired this grape successfully many times with fish, one of my favorite being braised Monkfish.

I'll have to check my cellar. It's not a varietal that I usually have in quantity, but I think I have an ancient-vines grenache something-or-other.
Reds normally don't taste great wih seafood because of the tannins and the type of protein in seafood.

Fish (and normally oily, fleshy fish such salmon, tuna, i.e. any non white fish) is something completly different. Lots of fish are okay with light reds,i.e. Pinot noir, Cab Franc, beaujolais.
Seafood is shellfish and molluscs, i.e. lobster, shrimp, crab, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops.

So depending what is being served, a pinot noir for certain people/dishes, and a good sauvignon blanc for others.
Riesling can go well, but if it is too sweet/fruity, as some german kabinetts, it can throw off the entire course.
Alsacian rieslings are a safer bet.

And as mentionned before, champagne will do wonders. Or even a white burgundy (or a decent chardonnay, avoid overoaked california chards)
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
But I just remembered that I have a bottle of that '04 St.-Urbans-Hof Riesling that made the top 100 list. I haven't tried it yet, would that do?


This was the last thing I typed before I left work, and upon a forehead-slapping reflection on the commute home, a $15 riesling probably isn't worth the corkage fee.
Thanks for the suggestions, sounds like I'll just have to bring a bottle of both. Looks like it's off the wine shop for me later this week. (Ah, geez. Not again! Wink) I'll print this out and be forearmed.
quote:
It's just that I'm not a big chardonnay fan, and really good white burgundys are scarce in these parts. But I just remembered that I have a bottle of that '04 St.-Urbans-Hof Riesling that made the top 100 list.


Hope I'm not too late... Pinot Grigio. I have tried it with several, non-saucy white fish dishes, and it seemed to do very well. I too find it hard to like Chards... Even the ones I thought I liked and bought are not doing too well with my palate. Pinot Grigio seems to fill the white-gap nicely. At the moment, it's my favorite white.
Well in the end, with 4 out of 5 of us having decent sized cellars, no one brought wine. We ordered off the the menu a Buty Semillion/Sauv Blanc, and a Tabalus Creek white (I'm not sure what type. It was sort of an old-world style with a mineral flavor profile. Went nicely with our dishes though.)
I'm keeping a printout of this thread for the next time I prepare a seafood dish at home.
Thanks all, and have a great holiday!

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