Skip to main content

Hi, I'm new here and need some help.


I will be attending a wine dinner tonight where the evening will be started with a Sauterne. Some of us will be having foie gras with is, but some of my friends will not eat it. What is another appetizer that would pair with the Sauterne?

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Patty
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

OK, steve, here it is.

There are several approaches to matching wine and Foie Gras.

1. rich dry white wines along the lines of Corton, Chablis, Meursault or Condrieu.

2. sweet white wines such as Sauternes, Barsac, Layon, Jurançon and others.

3. dry red wines from South West - Madiran and Cahors; red Bordeaux (dusty ones), CdP and certain Burgundies.



Which is the best way to serve it though?
I don't know, I've tried it every which way possible, I think, and I'm talking about both preparation of Foie Gras and wine pairings, and I have some answers, but... It appears to me, many people simply (and blindly) follow the dogma established by others, and these "others" are not very adventurous and only have Foie Gras with Sauternes, nothing else. This to me is entirely unacceptable.

In all these years I've been feasting on this magic liver, I've come up with two perfect matches for me. One is a homemade terrine of Foie Gras on a toasted brioche with a glass of Jurançon, and second, is fried fresh Foie Gras with young and chalky Madiran.


I think we need to do a virtual Foie Gras TAA or something. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by grunhauser:
OK, steve, here it is.

There are several approaches to matching wine and Foie Gras.

1. rich dry white wines along the lines of Corton, Chablis, Meursault or Condrieu.

2. sweet white wines such as Sauternes, Barsac, Layon, Jurançon and others.

3. dry red wines from South West - Madiran and Cahors; red Bordeaux (dusty ones), CdP and certain Burgundies.



Which is the best way to serve it though?
I don't know, I've tried it every which way possible, I think, and I'm talking about both preparation of Foie Gras and wine pairings, and I have some answers, but... It appears to me, many people simply (and blindly) follow the dogma established by others, and these "others" are not very adventurous and only have Foie Gras with Sauternes, nothing else. This to me is entirely unacceptable.

In all these years I've been feasting on this magic liver, I've come up with two perfect matches for me. One is a homemade terrine of Foie Gras on a toasted brioche with a glass of Jurançon, and second, is fried fresh Foie Gras with young and chalky Madiran.


I think we need to do a virtual Foie Gras TAA or something. Big Grin


Thanks Grunny. You finally make sense to me. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by Big M:
I'm a little confused by the question. You're going to a wine dinner where you will have foie gras with a Sauternes. Great choice, and IMO a great match as well. If this is a set menu, why would there be other choices? If there are other choices, knowing them may help with an answer.


Here was the problem, my French buddy wanted to share his 1991 Ch. d'Yquem with my wine tasting group. He wanted to serve it first with foie gras. Which is great for me, but there are two in our group who will not eat it due to the controversy over the treatment of these animals. Since I was in charge of bringing appetizers for this event, I was looking for an alternative for my non foie gras eating friends.

I ended up making a smoked salmon pate, which they seemed to be happy with and I enjoyed the foie gras with the Sauterne...mmmmmm
Hi,

It seems indeed strange to start a dinner with sauterne. As we used to serve the foie gras after the main course and before desert many years ago, sauterne is served with foie gras. Afterwards when desert was served they could continue with the sauterne. Those days the foie gras was prepared en croute what made it even more delicious.
Today we start with foie gras but the only problem with sauterne is what to serve after this wine as it is so overwhelming.
I always advised my clients ( I had a catering business making my own foie gras untill a couple years ago), at least those who were not in favor of sauterne, that they could continue with the champagne they were having as aperitive or red port or a sweet sherry. Even red wine could go along as is mentioned in earlier replies.
I personally prefer the sauterne with desert rather then with the foie gras
I agree with Grunhauser.
Which year will be served ?
Traditional foie gras with some type of sweet fruit is best with a sweet white. I've had it many times with many different wines, and this is the best. You can certainly prepare a more savory version which will match with many other wines. Interestingly, plain salted, seared foie gras slices served with a sweet white are also sublime. There is no right answer. I would try the different combinations and decide which works best for you.
Ok, I enjoyed the 2005 Guiraud last evening. Typically I would pair this with a nice plain cheese cake or something creamy. However, I wanted to try Roguefort since that apparently goes well.

I like this cheese on salad but eating it by itself with the Guiraud didnt do it for me. Should I have eaten it with something? I do appreciate why this cheese goes so well with Sauterne (salty and sweet) but it seemed to over power the Guiraud last night.

Any other suggestions? By the way, I am not a big foie gras guy.
I've had more Sauternes with appetizers than with desserts, allthough i know it's politically uncorrect to serve Sauternes (or Ports for instance) to start a meal. In Luxemburg, Port is considered an aperitif Wink. It has become a habit to comfortably sit around on the sofa before a big meal and enjoy a so-called dessert wine with appetizers (eg: foie gras). This usually happens well before (>1 hour) the real meal, so there's no real problem about which wine to serve next.
I've even had Tokay with foie gras as an appetizer and moved onto the next course with a Loire white and some fish and didn't have a problem with that combination. I think we are ok as long as the food gets slightly richer/more savoury as the evening moves on, and the wines more tannic and fuller flavoured. A Sauternes can work at either end of the meal.
quote:
Originally posted by marcb7:
Ok, I enjoyed the 2005 Guiraud last evening. Typically I would pair this with a nice plain cheese cake or something creamy. However, I wanted to try Roguefort since that apparently goes well.

I like this cheese on salad but eating it by itself with the Guiraud didnt do it for me. Should I have eaten it with something? I do appreciate why this cheese goes so well with Sauterne (salty and sweet) but it seemed to over power the Guiraud last night.

Any other suggestions? By the way, I am not a big foie gras guy.


You had the wrong blue cheese. Try a Stilton instead, and if you can find Colston Bassett Stilton that's even better. The Stilton has a certain zing (acidity?) that is lacking in the very creamy Roquefort. Whole Foods usually carries the Colston Bassett Stilton.
quote:
Originally posted by marcb7:
Grossie,

Thank you. I will look for that but am not optimistic that I will be able to find it here in NH. We dont have a whole foods Frown


One more thing- the cheese is much better if it's not straight out of the fridge. It needs a couple of hours to warm up. In Europe these cheeses are often not refrigerated at all, but here in NA we're so paranoid about food temperatures that we kill flavors with cold.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:

that is indeed interesting, was it Ma-La (numbingly spicy) or was it just the regular broth?


Regular broth. I've had and enjoy the spicy sauce though. The little dry chalky taste you can get with the pigs blood was rounded out by the wine, and the acidty and sweetness of the wine were tamed by the richness of the blood.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×