winetarelli posted:
brucehayes posted:

Ginger Baker at 80

Greatest rock drummer ever. I was just listening to Cream for an hour last night. What a legend. 

RIP. 

A force of nature, in music and in life.  A truly talented drummer.  Would have loved to hear more of him in other genres.  He always saw himself as a jazz drummer, interestingly enough.  RIP.

PH

My brother Dave. Suddenly at age 65.

My brother and his wife were celebrating their 40th anniversary with a drive down the west coast from Vancouver to LA. Two weeks ago, on the second last day of their vacation, Dave went for a swim in the ocean at Santa Monica, was hit hard by a wave, and was pulled under. By the time anyone realized what had happened and people found him, it was too late. He was on life support for five days but there was nothing that could be done. Fortunately his four children and their spouses had time to get to California to say goodbye. Life support was removed and he passed away a few hours later, just over a week ago.

A celebration of life was held yesterday in Ottawa, and family flew in from as far away as Scotland. Thanks so much to Bman and Mrs. Bman for taking the time to attend the visitation. Your presence and support meant a great deal to me.

Dave lived his life with more energy, passion and joy than anyone I've known. He was also deeply committed to his community and to helping others. He was one of the organizers of the annual motorcycle Ride for Dad in Ottawa, raising millions of dollars for prostate cancer research.

It's been a horrible, traumatic few weeks. He was a good friend and a good brother, and I miss him.

RIP: Congressman Elijah Cummings.  68. 

He graduated from U of MD law school 2 years ahead of me.  Was a wonderful man, a tireless champion for people who were underrepresented and downtrodden.  Tried mightily to help his constituents and to fight for justice. 

There are politicians who seem to use their office to enrich themselves in one way or the other.  Here was a man who sought to enrich the lives of others.

A lot of tears are shedding in Baltimore today.

 

irwin posted:

RIP: Congressman Elijah Cummings.  68. 

He graduated from U of MD law school 2 years ahead of me.  Was a wonderful man, a tireless champion for people who were underrepresented and downtrodden.  Tried mightily to help his constituents and to fight for justice. 

There are politicians who seem to use their office to enrich themselves in one way or the other.  Here was a man who sought to enrich the lives of others.

A lot of tears are shedding in Baltimore today.

 

One of the best.  Will be a great loss to democracy

billhike posted:
The Old Man posted:

‘Joey the Clown’ Lombardo is dead at 90

However a terribly written article by the Chicago Sun Times. Unless I missed it I can't tell exactly when he was sentenced to prison and how long he'd been in.

Not sure “RIP” is appropriate for the murdering scumbag.

Well we'll have to start a Bye-Bye Scumbag thread. We'll reserve a future spot for the racist in chief.

George Brancato.  Canadians, and those in Ottawa, will know him as the coach and former player of the Canadian Football League's Ottawa Rough Riders.  Born in the US, he played two seasons for the Chicago Cardinals, before playing in Canada. In 1981, he coached the Riders to a Grey Cup victory.

Paul Barrere, 71, of complications from liver disease. 

Guitarist, singer and songwriter with Little Feat. He joins the late, great Lowell George and drummer Richie Hayward. 

Paul wrote a number of Little Feat’s songs including All That You Dream, Feats Don’t Fail Me Now, Romance Dance, Skin It Back and Time Loves A Hero, and sang quite a few of them. 

sunnylea57 posted:

Paul Barrere, 71, of complications from liver disease. 

Guitarist, singer and songwriter with Little Feat. He joins the late, great Lowell George and drummer Richie Hayward. 

Paul wrote a number of Little Feat’s songs including All That You Dream, Feats Don’t Fail Me Now, Romance Dance, Skin It Back and Time Loves A Hero, and sang quite a few of them. 

Bummer. Loved Waiting for Columbus live album.

thistlintom posted:
sunnylea57 posted:

Paul Barrere, 71, of complications from liver disease. 

Guitarist, singer and songwriter with Little Feat. He joins the late, great Lowell George and drummer Richie Hayward. 

Paul wrote a number of Little Feat’s songs including All That You Dream, Feats Don’t Fail Me Now, Romance Dance, Skin It Back and Time Loves A Hero, and sang quite a few of them. 

Bummer. Loved Waiting for Columbus live album.

Serious bummer.  Loved that album as well, thistlintom.  I was an unpaid usher for the 3 shows at the Lisner Auditorium in August of !977.  The boys practically burned that place down.

PH

purplehaze posted:
thistlintom posted:
sunnylea57 posted:

Paul Barrere, 71, of complications from liver disease. 

Guitarist, singer and songwriter with Little Feat. He joins the late, great Lowell George and drummer Richie Hayward. 

Paul wrote a number of Little Feat’s songs including All That You Dream, Feats Don’t Fail Me Now, Romance Dance, Skin It Back and Time Loves A Hero, and sang quite a few of them. 

Bummer. Loved Waiting for Columbus live album.

Serious bummer.  Loved that album as well, thistlintom.  I was an unpaid usher for the 3 shows at the Lisner Auditorium in August of !977.  The boys practically burned that place down.

PH

Wow, that would have been phenomenal. Probably my biggest musical regret: I wish I'd seen them while Lowell was still alive but I'm not sure if they ever played in Toronto in the 70s. First time I saw them was in '89 - the first tour with Craig Fuller. Not even close to the same thing, but it was still a thrill for me.

The son of friends of ours was memorialized tonight after taking his own like last Thursday at age 22. He had struggled with mental health for a few years; his parents were quite active in trying to help him. Brian’s mom Tina delivered a wonderfully loving tribute to him - my wife and I were stunned at how she kept it together. While there were some very touching words said, it’s impossible for me to imagine the pain felt by our friends and their surviving son, and how they get some normalcy back in their lives. It frustrates me now knowing what to say to help them in any meaningful way. 

RIP Brian. 

billhike posted:

The son of friends of ours was memorialized tonight after taking his own like last Thursday at age 22. He had struggled with mental health for a few years; his parents were quite active in trying to help him. Brian’s mom Tina delivered a wonderfully loving tribute to him - my wife and I were stunned at how she kept it together. While there were some very touching words said, it’s impossible for me to imagine the pain felt by our friends and their surviving son, and how they get some normalcy back in their lives. It frustrates me now knowing what to say to help them in any meaningful way. 

RIP Brian. 

Bill,

so sorry to hear this, it is a shame that someone so young has taken their life.  The pain and helplessness that is felt by those suffering from depression is hard to understand by those who have not been afflicted by it.  I imagine that those around the person who took their life have a hard time understanding what this person was facing and may feel some guilt in not saving this person, but it is not their fault.  My condolences to all.   I think the best you can do is say you are sorry for their loss and that you are there if they want to talk.

Bill, that's awful and terribly sad. As Thistlintom said, I think the best you can do is to let them know that you care and that you're there for them if they need help with anything or a sympathetic ear. Give them space, but also check in with them once in awhile. 

I'm going to quote a good friend who recently gave me this piece of wisdom (gained from personal experience): 

The last thing I learned is how very quickly people move on and forget how much you’re still hurting. Weeks, months, years later, precious few even remember what happened and when. Which hurts a little but again, grief if so intensely personal and is so different for everyone. Unless you’re highly expressive about your feelings, people just don’t know where you are in the process. 

Which is why I suggest doing the occasional check-in. Just knowing that you're still thinking about them can be a tremendous help.

 

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