RIP...

I just watched Anthony Bourdain's meal with President Obama in Vietnam.  How cool was that?

 

Then I read for the first time his 1999 Article that started his path to fame.  I noted in particular these sentences: "People who order their meat well-done perform a valuable service for those of us in the business who are cost-conscious: they pay for the privilege of eating our garbage... the philistine who orders his food well-done is not likely to notice the difference between food and flotsam."

The man had a way with words that seem so relevant nineteen years later.

wineismylife posted:
wineart 2 posted:

Sunny, and to have one of your dearest and closest friends find you. It hurts deeply to think about. 

One of my top five things in the world to do and to plan out is, having dinner with friends in cities no one at the table is from. You know Eric and Tony had dinner plans in a glorious city. 

Plus he left an 11 year old daughter behind.  Absolutely tragic on all levels.

Plus he left an 11 year old daughter ...

More than any other aspect of this sad event, this aspect saddens me the most.

Anyone who is mentally "healthy." would consider the trauma to someone so young and so close.  He had to be in a very bad place to do this.  RIP.  

PH

wineart 2 posted:

He is too busy working to pardon Muhammad Ali, something the Supreme Court did in 1971. 

Complete and total buffoon....

A distinction, and an important one...

He wasn't pardoned.  His conviction was overturned.  There's a big difference between being forgiven and  being innocent.

PH

jcocktosten posted:

Must be pretty traumatic for Eric Ripert - definitely blows.  Good thing we are cutting funding for mental health - 

Highly doubt it was a lack of public funding that precluded Bourdain from seeking help for his illness.  More likely the macho restaurant culture and the general perception that guy's need to "man up" and deal with things on their own.  

csm posted:
jcocktosten posted:

Must be pretty traumatic for Eric Ripert - definitely blows.  Good thing we are cutting funding for mental health - 

Highly doubt it was a lack of public funding that precluded Bourdain from seeking help for his illness.  More likely the macho restaurant culture and the general perception that guy's need to "man up" and deal with things on their own.  

I'm pretty sure jc meant this in a much broader sense.  And I agree with his sentiment.

PH

purplehaze posted:
csm posted:
jcocktosten posted:

Must be pretty traumatic for Eric Ripert - definitely blows.  Good thing we are cutting funding for mental health - 

Highly doubt it was a lack of public funding that precluded Bourdain from seeking help for his illness.  More likely the macho restaurant culture and the general perception that guy's need to "man up" and deal with things on their own.  

I'm pretty sure jc meant this in a much broader sense.  And I agree with his sentiment.

PH

Agreed, but my point was that additional resources, while helpful, will be something of a band-aid. Culture needs to change and for it to be okay to seek help if you need it, especially among men.  

csm posted:
purplehaze posted:
csm posted:
jcocktosten posted:

Must be pretty traumatic for Eric Ripert - definitely blows.  Good thing we are cutting funding for mental health - 

Highly doubt it was a lack of public funding that precluded Bourdain from seeking help for his illness.  More likely the macho restaurant culture and the general perception that guy's need to "man up" and deal with things on their own.  

I'm pretty sure jc meant this in a much broader sense.  And I agree with his sentiment.

PH

Agreed, but my point was that additional resources, while helpful, will be something of a band-aid. Culture needs to change and for it to be okay to seek help if you need it, especially among men.  

I think we're on the same page here, csm.  But for culture to change, resources can't hurt.  And gig's advice to personally reach out and get involved is valid as well.  Between additional awareness and personal involvement with people we know, perhaps we can put a small dent in this.  And I speak with intimate personal knowledge of people suffering from depression.

PH

 

Depression is a horrible thing to deal with, especially if it is coupled with anxiety.  Part of the problem is withdrawal which inhibits seeking help when needed.  Also, many dealing with depression try to mask it and act normal.  I believe that there are various forms of depression, and it affects people in different ways.  For example, there can be more of a situational depression, caused by a reaction to something that has happened to the individual.  In these instances, there may be immediate danger of suicide, but there also is a more likelihood of a quicker recovery from the instance.  Other depressions, maybe due to physiological imbalances may be deeper and harder to overcome and require significant therapy and likely medications that may be required for a long time.

If one notices changes in behavior by a friend or someone you know, you can ask the person if they are having any problems, let them know you are there to support them if needed.  But the biggest key is getting the person to seek help from a professional.  Getting out of depression can be extremely difficult and may require professional help along with medications.

I feel a sense of grief beyond what I ought to feel given that I do not personally know him except through Parts Unknown and No Reservations series.  Mr. Bourdain, I hope you find the peace that alluded you in this theater and you are now and forever in a better place.  You are missed.

thistlintom posted:

 I believe that there are various forms of depression, and it affects people in different ways.  For example, there can be more of a situational depression, caused by a reaction to something that has happened to the individual.  In these instances, there may be immediate danger of suicide, but there also is a more likelihood of a quicker recovery from the instance. 

One has to be very careful not to conflate sadness (even profound sadness) or "feeling depressed"  with medical depression.  

People who are not suffering from depression are highly unlikely to commit, or even consider suicide even in the face of profound tragedy.  A lack of understanding of this disorder can lead to friends and loved ones just thinking that someone will "get over it," or "shake it off." 

A good summary by the APA HERE...

PH

 

purplehaze posted:

One has to be very careful not to conflate sadness (even profound sadness) or "feeling depressed"  with medical depression.  

People who are not suffering from depression are highly unlikely to commit, or even consider suicide even in the face of profound tragedy.  A lack of understanding of this disorder can lead to friends and loved ones just thinking that someone will "get over it," or "shake it off." 

 

PH

 

You are correct, there is a difference between sadness or grieving and depression.  However, some people think that people with depression can just get over it and it is not that easy.

I have been sad and have had depression, there is a huge difference.  Depression is a real force that is hard to combat, it distorts your thinking and affects one physically.  If you know someone who you think may be suffering from depression, don't think or say that you can just get over it, recognize it is a serious issue and let them know you are there to help them, suggest that they talk with someone who is an expert and let them know that they can get through this with help.

I'm still shaken by this. Not many people on the screen allow you to connect with them to the point of actually feeling you personally know them. RIP 

On another note, my wife and I stayed in the hotel in Kayserberg less than 2 years ago where they found Bourdain. One of the best meals I've ever had. 

mangiare posted:

I'm still shaken by this. Not many people on the screen allow you to connect with them to the point of actually feeling you personally know them. RIP 

On another note, my wife and I stayed in the hotel in Kayserberg less than 2 years ago where they found Bourdain. One of the best meals I've ever had. 

When we were in Vietnam in February we went to the spot in Hanoi where he took Obama. We discovered it was just around the corner from our hotel. It's a tiny hole in the wall joint - as are most of the best spots in Hanoi.

There are now multiple photos on the walls of the owner posing with both Bourdain and Obama.

I would say that our decision to visit Vietnam for 3 weeks was influenced to some degree by Bourdain and his passion for the country and its food.

sd-wineaux posted:
captaincancun posted:

I once ate a taco with Anthony... He is an amazing guy.

It's going to take a while addressing him in the past tense. 

 

I'd love to raise a glass and talk with you about that. Well, anything, but we could start with that.

That would be nice, if you ever travel to the Pacific Northwest and can visit Vancouver Island let me know when.

Apart from winter which is when I recharge down south.

Anne Donovan.  Hall of Fame basketball player (Naismith Hall of Fame in 1995, inaugural class of the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999, and in 2015 the FIBA Hall of Fame), three time Olympian (two gold medals) coach, and mentor to many basketball players (both women and men).  And by all accounts, one heck of a great person.

purplehaze posted:

Charles Krauhthammer.  I disagreed with almost every opinion he had, but respected his intellect and writing.  Sometimes you need to listen to those you disagree with.

PH

Agree completely with PH. Even though I disagreed with a lot of it, he was a fantastic writer. Especially when he would do a column on sports. Interestingly, as a staunch conservative, his most recent columns were very anti-Trump, and made for fascinating reading.

purplehaze posted:

Charles Krauhthammer.  I disagreed with almost every opinion he had, but respected his intellect and writing.  Sometimes you need to listen to those you disagree with.

PH

This pretty much guarantees we are not going to have many subjects we agree on eye to eye! But civil talk is certainly enjoyable.  

purplehaze posted:

Charles Krauhthammer.  I disagreed with almost every opinion he had, but respected his intellect and writing.  Sometimes you need to listen to those you disagree with.

PH

He will be missed.  If only we had more people like Charles on both sides of the aisle who could discuss political matters civilly and from a position of well reasoned ideology, we would be much better off.  Political discourse has gone off the cliff, and is the main reason I don't get into political discussions on social media and am careful with discussions in public.

bomba503 posted:

XXXTentacion

Spoke to a generation few on this board will be able to appreciate or relate to

Count me among the few...  I am not a fan of the genre, so forgive my ignorance.  It sounds as though he was a violent misogynist.  I respect your musical insight, and would appreciate a brief comment on what I'm missing.  

PH

sunnylea57 posted:

Well this one sucks. Harlan Ellison. 84 years old.

That's odd. I was just thinking about him yesterday.

Image result for Harlan Ellison

I met him a couple times back in the 70's. This is how I remember him. I'm pretty sure I saw him wearing the same outfit. He was in his early 40's then, and such a powerhouse of a personality packed into about a 5'6" frame. Loved his stories, but in the past 15-20 years, he devolved into a pretty bitter, litigious old man. Spent all his time worrying and suing for any perceived copywrite infringements, instead of sitting down and creating new tales. Still, my fascination with his Deathbird Stories made my folks really wonder about me.

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sunnylea57 posted:

Harlan Ellison. 84 years old.

First discovered him through the excellent anthology he edited, Dangerous Visions. Also wrote probably the best Star Trek TOS' episode The City on the Edge of Forever. If you ever get a chance to read his short story I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream it will having you screaming in horror.

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