RIP...

You’ll recall that John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were political rivals, but colleagues, and they died on the exact same day.
Turns out Ted Kennedy and John McCain were political rivals, each not quite getting to the Presidency, and they died on the same day also, 9 years apart, of the same form of cancer.
What a great man John McCain was.  What a loss to the country. 

Our condolences to his family.

Although he had a couple of stumbles in his political career, I always admired him. He truly believed in the principles and standards of our country, and fought almost more than anyone else to uphold them. Only those that made the ultimate sacrifice did more. I cannot think of a single person in DC today that is fit to take up his mantle, and the entire lot of them combined could never match his worth. 

Heard today that Bush II, Obama, and Biden will be speaking at his funeral. The POS was pointedly not invited to attend. But I'm sure that somehow he will try to make it all about himself.

McCain endured things that most people couldn't imagine, he loved his country and was a patriot.  I hope his family has solace and that he RIP.  I have some issues with his political stances, but I don't doubt that he did things that he thought was in the best interest of his country.  I wish we would have more people who cared as deeply as he did about the country that are in positions of political power.

vinoevelo posted:

Don Panoz.  Did so much for sportscar racing from car design to tracks to governing bodies and everything else to drag it forward.  Still love his GT1 cars.

Thanks for the info.  Missed that he passed.  A fun guy, met him many times during my racing days.

flwino posted:
vinoevelo posted:

Don Panoz.  Did so much for sportscar racing from car design to tracks to governing bodies and everything else to drag it forward.  Still love his GT1 cars.

Thanks for the info.  Missed that he passed.  A fun guy, met him many times during my racing days.

A very nice guy and super smart. Invented the trans-dermal patch, most widely used as the nicotine patch and owned Chateau Elan in Georgia. He was a real wine guy. But I'll always like him the most for creating the American LeMans Series and dragging my home track Mosport out of the 60's and into the present. 

theoldman posted:

The underappreciated Marty Balin. One of my top concerts was the free Jefferson Airplane appearance at Grant Park, Chicago in 1969. 

I listened to Surrealistic Pillow yesterday. First time in about half a year. Had no idea he had died. Funny how that works, but really great album. RIP. 

Willie McCovey, age 80.  A great baseball player for the Giants.  Hall of Fame. 18 grand slams.  One of only 4 players in history to hit a home run in 4 different decades. Finished with 521 Homers.  Hit 3 pinch hit Grand Slams.  Rookie of the year.

He was one of the best ever.

 

irwin posted:

Willie McCovey, age 80.  A great baseball player for the Giants.  Hall of Fame. 18 grand slams.  One of only 4 players in history to hit a home run in 4 different decades. Finished with 521 Homers.  Hit 3 pinch hit Grand Slams.  Rookie of the year.

He was one of the best ever.

 

An all time great. R.I.P.

winetarelli posted:
sunnylea57 posted:

Stan Lee. 95 years of age.

We all knew it was coming. But it’s big. He changed how we story. 

"How we story"? Anyway it was for the worse. Turned an already 14-year-old Hollywood targeted audience to an endless stream of made-for-children comic book movies and sequels. Hooray for Hollywood.

The Old Man posted:
winetarelli posted:
sunnylea57 posted:

Stan Lee. 95 years of age.

We all knew it was coming. But it’s big. He changed how we story. 

"How we story"? Anyway it was for the worse. Turned an already 14-year-old Hollywood targeted audience to an endless stream of made-for-children comic book movies and sequels. Hooray for Hollywood.

Yes, TOM. 

How we tell stories. What types of stories we tell. The media used. He didn’t have a huge impact on me, but on many people I know. And for them, he made them feel seen. Or so they say. 

I like many of the Marvel films. I do wish that type of money was put behind some more substantial projects as well, too, these days. But that is beyond the point I’m making here. 

winetarelli posted:
The Old Man posted:
winetarelli posted:
sunnylea57 posted:

Stan Lee. 95 years of age.

We all knew it was coming. But it’s big. He changed how we story. 

"How we story"? Anyway it was for the worse. Turned an already 14-year-old Hollywood targeted audience to an endless stream of made-for-children comic book movies and sequels. Hooray for Hollywood.

Yes, TOM. 

How we tell stories.

Forgive my grammar policing. The trend of the verbing of nouns really gives me the willies.

This period in film history reminds me of the late 70s when children's stories--like "Star Wars", "Indiana Jones" and the creation of the "blockbuster" caused the great new wave of late 60s to mid 70s Hollywood filmmaking to crumble away. This trend really exploded again in the 21st century  (after 9/11 and the sobering of America?) with comic book heros in mega-franchises aimed squarely at teenagers.

Anyways blah, blah, blah, "Citizen Kane."

Glad you're safe and your home is only smoky not burned down.

TOM movies, like literature, are art and social commentary but they are also escapism. There are periods of time when that last reason for movie goers is the most important. Marvel studios has consistently done a great job of making good quality escapism that appeals both to the common person and a broad swath of the population that has always felt marginalized.

It's actually helped geek/nerdiness to be less stigmatized. Maybe not high art but not in someways no less important.

Stan Lee introduced some unique heroes such as Spider-Man and Hulk to a couple of generations of fans. He had a significant influence on pop culture.

History will eventually determine how important his contributions are. I suppose Hercules, Odysseus, Beowulf, and similar superheroes of previous generations all had their detractors who weren’t smart enough to recognize the influence those fictional characters would have on Western civilization and world literature.  I don’t know whether Lee’s characters will have that kind of longevity, but it’s pretty silly to be dismissive of his impact before it’s measured by the test of time; we already know that he’s greatly influenced a contemporary genre. Not a lot of people have ever been able to do that.

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