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I went to Mt. Airy casino in the Poconos yesterday, played some craps last night, then played golf this morning (great course by the way at $45 with cart).

I did not watch any 9/11 hoopla either. I don't need to watch any more footage or hear stories about it. The twin towers disintergrating in front of my eyes is burned into memory. We got the folker who was responsible. That's enough for me.
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Originally posted by g-man:
having been around the area 10 years back.

i spent the day putting together a baby crib and a wine rack.

skipped all of the tv hoopla

Congrats to you and your wonderful wife. I think about what happened often. A person who shares my exact name was lost in the towers. I ate at windows on the world 9 days before they were struck. One of my high school classmates lost their life. But also agree that after 10 years, hopefully we can turn a page and not commemorate it in such a somber way. Bin Laden has been killed- time to move past the tragedy and never forget, but not make each and every 9/11 a day filled with so much sadness. I do not think the people that risked and lost their lives want to be remembered in that manner... If it was me, I wouldn't. May they all be remembered in a more positive and meaningful way.
I didn't watch any of the specials, but I certainly remember and understand that we are dealing with Religious zealots who twist their religion for there own perverted purposes and control large portions of the Islamic world.

I remember being shocked when Reagan and Lennon were shot, but 9-11 was a whole different level.

I can only hope the Islamic world can learn how to have religion enrich their lives rather than as a method to control people's lives.
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
I didn't watch any of the specials, but I certainly remember and understand that we are dealing with Religious zealots who twist their religion for there own perverted purposes and control large portions of the Islamic world.

I remember being shocked when Reagan and Lennon were shot, but 9-11 was a whole different level.

I can only hope the Islamic world can learn how to have religion enrich their lives rather than as a method to control people's lives.

Come on, I think your opinions are far too broad and ill-formed. I have met many people of Muslim faith, and not once have I ever heard them supportive or even sympathetic with the small minority that were responsible for 9/11. Most are VERY peaceful, and many innocent Muslims were killed that day, and in the 10 years since, by a small group of extremists. To paint such a broad stroke is wrong; no one would have said the same thing about fundamentalist Christianty after Oklahoma City, or even the recent tragedy in Norway. Let's try not to perpetuate the stereotypes that divide us as human beings.
quote:
Originally posted by TPEwinedrinker:
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
I didn't watch any of the specials, but I certainly remember and understand that we are dealing with Religious zealots who twist their religion for there own perverted purposes and control large portions of the Islamic world.

I remember being shocked when Reagan and Lennon were shot, but 9-11 was a whole different level.

I can only hope the Islamic world can learn how to have religion enrich their lives rather than as a method to control people's lives.

Come on, I think your opinions are far too broad and ill-formed. I have met many people of Muslim faith, and not once have I ever heard them supportive or even sympathetic with the small minority that were responsible for 9/11. Most are VERY peaceful, and many innocent Muslims were killed that day, and in the 10 years since, by a small group of extremists. To paint such a broad stroke is wrong; no one would have said the same thing about fundamentalist Christianty after Oklahoma City, or even the recent tragedy in Norway. Let's try not to perpetuate the stereotypes that divide us as human beings.
Well said TPEwinedrinker.

911 should be first and foremost about remembering innocent lives lost of many nations and religions that were killed that day. Secondly, it also should be a reminder that we should continue the effort to eradicate violence and achieve world harmony. Without being too presumptious, the lost victims of 911 would want the same thing too.
I was up in Spanish Harlem in my 6th of 9 years of residency.
A bridge that crossed the hospital buildings up at Columbia had a clear and unobstructed view. Like many here have observed, it was unbelievable.

We cleared out the hospital and discharged pretty much anyone who was not dying to make room for the injured. We were ready for any and all trauma, but as the initial days passed, we realized, like everyone else, there were no survivors.

A few of us were able to get down to ground zero with medical clearance. Seeing the massive destruction that was as high as a skyscraper was unforgettable. Like many physicians, we went down there to join the effort to help any survivors, but we ended up helping the work crews (NYPD, FDNY) with the injuries they sustained. Our time was also spent identifying body parts and bagging them for DNA analysis for families.

The silver lining has to be the way New Yorkers treated each other in the months to follow. There was a solemn unity that I observed, and I will never forget that.
I cannot watch any of the remembrances either. I think this was unarguably America's worst day and I don't wish to relive it.

I also have big problems with the memorial. I see it as ultra-depressing. As if the image of constant falling down (the waterfalls) isn't bad enough, the buildings and bodies the water represents are sent down into a never ending abyss in the center. Kind of like, with water running down the side into a hole,--I hate to say--flushing a toilet.
I watched a lot of the coverage on television, and while I agree that I'd rather avoid so much of the sadness and horror, for me it's a strong reminder of why we need to continue to remember those who fought and fight, and why what we hold so dear is so tender. It was truly awe-inspiring to see the American public rally together in those immediate days and weeks after 9/11, but as with anything else time passes and people tend to forget how fragile our society, freedom and beliefs are and they start to fall back into the rut of complaining and expecting things to be handed to them. While it is sad, I force myself to watch every bit of coverage of Pearl Harbor, 9/11, the World Wars, etc. because I want to appreciate everything that so many have paid for me to be able to sit here and post stupid comments on a wine magazine's website.
I was playing golf that morning with a good friend. Came back to the car, turned on the radio, and began to listen to the news. So, my first notice was without pictures.
Yesterday, I went out with the same friend and played another round. We were joined by his son, who served 7 years in Iraq and Afghanistan.
My thoughts are with the victims and their families, with the troops, and with this great land of America.
I also skipped the replays yesterday.

I remember the original day, seeing the news, and having two inappropriate responses.

First, I spent way too much time trying to wrap my mind around "How the Hell did that happen? and thinking about the purely mechanical apsects of the whole thing.

Second, I initially thought 40 or 50 thousand people must have perished, and either that day or the next when they started saying 3,000 had perished, my first fleeting thought was "Thank goodness." I caught myself rationilizing that terible toll as being "better than it could have been."

It took a few days for my emotional response to really catch up; which, now that I am a decade older, I realize is how I tend to integrate other terrible news (family deaths, etc.) It took me several days for the feelings part to hit me, and I still have yet to feel "better" about what happened. No amount of blowing up other countries' stuff, etc. has that feeling better. It just sits there....forever.

(I do admit, though, to perhaps further inappropriate feelings of happiness when Bin Laden was killed. It really made my day, to tell ya the truth.)
I always watch at least some coverage of the anniversary events and the replays of what happened. In my opinion, it's the most important national event of my liftime. I can still remember almost everything about the whole day. A co-worker was on the phone on hold, and instead of "hold music" he was listening to news. After not knowing what kind of plane hit the first tower, we shortly thereafter learned about the second plane and knew it was terrorism. When the pentagon was hit and there were reports about an additional hijacked plane, I started getting nervous.

On my way home from work while listening to the radio in the car, I heard either Bush or Giuliani say something about "not letting them put fear into you" so I said to myself, screw those bastards, and I went to the gym. The TV's in front of the cardio equipment were the first footage I had seen all day. I probably had one of my better workouts, and once I got home I was probably up until 3 in the morning watching news coverage. I had what could probably be referred to as an obsession for quite some time. When Bin Laden was killed, I was in a celebratory mood, with no reservations.

I'll certainly never forget, and my thought is that many families who lost someone would appreciate this remaining an extremely important event in our history, not shoved into the background. My condolences to any of you who knew someone who was lost.

One of my very best friends is a Captain in the Army, in Medical Services. He left his job as a school director and psychologist a few years ago to join. Interestingly, his birthday is September 11. Yet another reminder.
If you have the opportunity to watch the 'Rising' series, I thought it was very good. Its about 5 hour long episodes that chronicle the stories of a few dozen people associated with the rebuilding of WTC with a lot of focus on the memorial. The personal connections, the architechture, and what it means for a lot of different people were very powerful.
There is very little rehashing of the events in 2001, much more focus on what the new space represents for the families of the murder victims, the people that have been working at the site for years, the neighborhood, NYC, and America.

While everyone will interpret the space in their own way, if you don't have a positive opinion of how it was done, this series may open your mind to other perspectives on what various features were intended to represent and why many people with direct connections feel it is a beautiful space facilitating healing and closure.

The closest connection I have to the tragedy is that I simply was an American a thousand miles away. However, I feel compelled to visit the memorial. I can comprehend the tragedy of the people working there or on the planes of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. I can't process the emotions I feel for those rescuers that actually had to display courage running into those buildings. Yes, their job entailed putting their lives at risk everyday. But what they thought was a risk, was a planned certain outcome intended to create more victims.

I visited the towers when tall. I've visited the void. I want to see the memorial. For me, maybe it will help to witness the sites beauty and magisty and personally know and feel it is an appropriate ying to the yang of the tragedy that occurred 10 years ago.

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