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Starting to get into Tales From the Loop, an Amazon series based on images by Swedish artist  Simon Stålenhag. Odd doesn't even begin to cover it; think unexplained, retro sci-fi machinery, spires, giant robots, and abandoned metal spheres littering the landscape. Ostensibly centered someplace in Ohio, it is mostly filmed in a perpetual twilight and oozes Scandinavian winter dreariness. But each episode centers on one person in the town, and though slow moving, it draws you in by being utterly fascinating. 

Last edited by mneeley490
purplehaze posted:
spo posted:

Looking forward to season 3 of Fauda on Netflix.

 

I loved the first two seasons of this series.  Very happy to know that season 3 is coming soon. As someone who is a friend of several Israelis and Palestinians,  I can recommend the first 2 seasons without hesitation.  Reasonably balanced, and very well done.  Hope season 3 is equally balanced and entertaining.

PH

Did you watch this? I watched the whole season in 2 sittings. Best season yet! 

Last edited by spo
spo posted:
purplehaze posted:
spo posted:

Looking forward to season 3 of Fauda on Netflix.

 

I loved the first two seasons of this series.  Very happy to know that season 3 is coming soon. As someone who is a friend of several Israelis and Palestinians,  I can recommend the first 2 seasons without hesitation.  Reasonably balanced, and very well done.  Hope season 3 is equally balanced and entertaining.

PH

Did you watch this? I watched the whole season in 2 sittings. Best season yet! 

Only the first episode.  I'm psyched at your review of S3.  I hope to get a few  episodes in tonight.  

Folks, if you haven't tried this show, please do.  It's really, really good.  I'll echo a recommendation I read here early on in Season 1 to watch this show in the original Hebrew and Arabic and use subtitles.  The English overdubs are not so good.  Plus I've learned some new words in both languages!

PH

irwin posted:
jcocktosten posted:
irwin posted:

I'm looking forward to the next offline with PH, when he and I can speak Hebrew with each other so as to confuse the other guys.  How do you say, "Nice tannins" in Hebrew anyway?

Most likely טנינים טובים

Yes, we lawyers have not much to do these days.

Speak for yourself - I am swamped (although doing it all from home which is not all that unusual for me) - 

jcocktosten posted:
irwin posted:

I'm looking forward to the next offline with PH, when he and I can speak Hebrew with each other so as to confuse the other guys.  How do you say, "Nice tannins" in Hebrew anyway?

Most likely טנינים טובים

Actually a word I learned that easy to say, and might be useful is (and I'm transliterating here) is:

Sababa.  

Apparently Arabic in origin, but used in both languages.  I am amazed at the similarities between Arab and Israeli culture, norms, diet and language and the continuous disconnect.  Similar to the Protestants and Catholics in Ireland.  Just find some common ground and work on that, people.

PH

Last edited by purplehaze
purplehaze posted:
jcocktosten posted:
irwin posted:

I'm looking forward to the next offline with PH, when he and I can speak Hebrew with each other so as to confuse the other guys.  How do you say, "Nice tannins" in Hebrew anyway?

Most likely טנינים טובים

Actually a word I learned that easy to say, and might be useful is (and I'm transliterating here) is:

Sababa.  

PH

Used in both Hebrew and Arabic I believe - very useful term - can be used as cool, great or no problem

purplehaze posted:
jcocktosten posted:
irwin posted:

I'm looking forward to the next offline with PH, when he and I can speak Hebrew with each other so as to confuse the other guys.  How do you say, "Nice tannins" in Hebrew anyway?

Most likely טנינים טובים

Actually a word I learned that easy to say, and might be useful is (and I'm transliterating here) is:

Sababa.  

PH

Last time I was in Israel, Stef and I turned to my sister and asked her what some signs were saying as we did not know the words and my sister turns to us laughing and says just sound it at -  they were just English words written in Hebrew letters so looked strange to us but simply said what they were in English.  Like television and espresso (I know not english but sane result) looked weird in Hebrew

"I am amazed at the similarities between Arab and Israeli culture, norms, diet and language and the continuous disconnect." 

The press reported that last week some Palestinians in Gaza were trying to "zoom" with some Israelis to discuss peace. But, Hamas learned about it and arrested the Palestinians, and, I suppose, confiscated their computers and probably beat them up.   Disconnect indeed.

 

"Last time I was in Israel, Stef and I turned to my sister and asked her what some signs were saying as we did not know the words and my sister turns to us laughing and says just sound it at -  they were just English words written in Hebrew letters so looked strange to us but simply said what they were in English."

I was in Israel for a visit years ago when Ted Kennedy drove off a bridge at a place I'd never heard of in Massachusetts called "Chappaquiddick"...  Try reading that in Hebrew, since there is no "CH" or "Q".  Hard enough to get through Massachusetts. 

 

 

@sunnylea57 posted:

Interesting how they take the basic plot of the books and completely rework the rest. Not just in this season. 

I read that season 7 will be the last. 

That has been one of its great strengths. Somehow they managed, of course with the help of Connolly himself, to mash up the books and change whole plots and still keep it very "Boschian." I'd say it's rare to have an author not only allow such major changes, but participate in it. Sounds like I'm going to be disappointed in season six, but I hope the essential LA-ness is still there.

@Vino Bevo posted:

Been blitzing through What We Do in the Shadows on Hulu...

I love this show, but I don't know how many seasons they can sustain. But they're always manage to hit some high points in every episode. For Matt Berry fans there is also "Toast of London" and his frequent appearances on "The IT Crowd."

"Letterkenny" continues to be the funniest , and stupidest, show on television. Also on Hulu, so pitter-patter...

@mneeley490 posted:

Anyone else watching Dispatches From Elsewhere on AMC? It is freaky and confusing, but kind of wonderful in a way. 

This just finished up it's 10 episode run. Amazing doesn't begin to describe it. The final episode takes you someplace you would never have expected to go, and my respect for Jason Segel as a writer/producer has skyrocketed. He's not that guy from Freaks and Geeks or Forgetting Sarah Marshall anymore.

@steve8 posted:

Just started (first two episodes) The Plot Against America. Not bad so far.

After the horrors of The Man in the High Castle I couldn't watch another WWII era alternate reality story. I'm also planning on reading the book. Interesting tidbit, the spy author Len Deighton published in 1979 SS-GB which was a police procedural in Nazi occupied England. It was a good book which was made into a BBC series in 2017. I've not seen and it's supposed to have an open ending leading to a second season which isn't going to happen.

Finished the season six of Bosch and am rewatching the series from the beginning. I thought this was a good season even though I couldn't stand the build-up with the wacko group. Watching actors give it their all while spouting nonsense got very tedious after a number of episodes. It was good to see Richard Brooks, from the original Law and Order, after all these years.

What makes Bosch so interesting is that it exists in a parallel universe. The relationships on the TV show often do not reflect what occurs in the books. And yet both universes are excellent. Seeing him and J. Edgar, have a better relationship on the show than the books, makes for a more engaging show. It's been a joy to watch Madison Lintz grow up (into almost a fashion model) and a good actress whose scenes with Welliver are always interesting. Of course Titus Welliver is Bosch and all the other characters; Crate and Barrel, LT, the always fantastic Lance Reddick as Chief Irving, Mank and Honey/Money Chandler who work and react together in such a natural way.

I also want to mention Ernest Dickerson who started out as a cinematographer on the mostly forgotten, and very good, movie Brother From Another Planet and went on to be an excellent TV show director with credits such as this program and The Wire.

However, it is a little depressing watching a show that was so recently filmed in a world that may not exist again for some time. Bosch is one of those LA TV shows, and also like the books, that revels in its "LAness." Bosch is a guy who hangs in spots like Musso & Franks Grill, Du-Pars and Dan Tanas. The show used the Bradbury Building, Angels Flight, the Capitol Records tower and many other LA landmarks and locations to get the feel of LA. And now I can't even make one of my runs up there to go to Canter for a corned beef sandwich roam the Art District. 

Here's a odd note: Just having finished six and starting season one there's an interesting fashion statement that appears to run through the entire show--the men's neckties all have a large, loose knot. Not sure what it means, but it's something I recently noted.

Last edited by The Old Man

Watched 2 episodes last night - good cast, good performance - one must like musicals and not have a problem with characters breaking into song - 

I have no issue with that (some people cannot tolerateit) so liked it and will continue watching - I liked Jane Levy from Suburgatory, and cast includes - Peter Gallagher, Mary Steenburgen, Skylar Austin, Lauren Graham and others 

I never saw Eli Stone

McMillions

The HBO documentary mini-series about the McDonalds Monopoly scam that took place in the 1990s. For my money, far more interesting and entertaining than Tiger King. The story and the cast of characters are equally bizarre.

We’re half way through the 6 episodes. I keep wondering why all these people - from the FBI agents to the mobster’s wife and brother- would agree to be interviewed on camera and reveal so much. 

We've been working through a few series of various themes (and quality) these last few weeks:

  • What We Do in the Shadows (I mentioned this earlier in the post and like it so much I'll mention it again)
  • Good Omens (good concept - enjoyed)
  • A Discovery of Witches (my sister told my wife about it, and it's too much like Twilight - meh)
  • Upload (intriguing concept but jury is still out)
  • Jack Ryan (I'd seen but but she hadn't so went through it again, and forgot how much I liked season one better than two)
  • Fleabag (outstanding)
  • Damages (never watched when it originally came out and just finished season one - hooked!)

 

@wine+art posted:

Hmm, now I want to try it. 

I can understand giving up during or after S01E01. She’s shallow and annoying, and the ”breaking the 4th wall” thing is hardly original.

But the series does a slow build over the course of the two seasons. There’s a deliberate arc to the story and character development. It’s not high art, but it’s very well done. Especially Season 2.

On the other hand, I suffered through the first season of her other series, Killing Eve. Didn’t like it at all.

@The Old Man posted:

I think they could have easily cut McMillions in half. Also that supercilious, self-congratulating FBI agent really got tiresome.

I respectfully disagree. The first few episodes were fast paced and shallow. It had a “staring at a traffic accident” feel to it. “Look at all these stupid, freakish people!” But I appreciated that it took a more sober turn in the second half. They took the time to let us get to know some of the participants and how their lives were impacted by their actions.

As for that FBI agent, his more annoying traits got a lot of screen time in the first episode, but he was less of a focus as the story progressed, and when he was on camera, he was often more reserved. He sure did have a toothy grin, though. Reminded me of Ed Grimley (Martin Short’s character).

And the real estate guy was a dead ringer for John Goodman - both his looks and his voice.

Great british menu. 

The full 2019-2020 season is on YouTube as well as 2014. You can find 2018 online too (and of course watch all 15 seasons if you can get bbc iPlayer).

If you enjoy cooking competition shows this one pits mostly 1 and 2 star Michelin chefs against each other to cook one of four courses at a banquet. In no way "American" reality TV, they help each other, clean up, know what the hell they are doing and its the best cooking show on TV. 

Mrs. America

Fantastic performances by all the leads, and every episode is fast paced and engaging. My biggest criticism: it tries to pack too much into the 9 episodes and consequently the nuance is often lost and most of the characters aren’t as fully realized as they could be, simply because they aren’t given enough screen time.

Started watching The Spy, an Israeli espionage drama based on a true story. Created by Gideon Raff who previously did Prisoners of War, the Israeli series that the first seasons of Homeland were based on. Starring Sacha Baron Cohen and Noah Emmerich. 

Gave up after 3 episodes. It should have come in yellow packaging and been called "No Name Spy Series". It had every silly spy trope imaginable.

Sneaking out of a party to scale the outside wall of the building, and breaking into the host's 3rd floor office to take microfilm photos of documents, and nearly getting caught when someone gets suspicious and checks the office.

Nervously sweating it out at the Syrian border because the border guards are examining your suitcases and you don't want them to find the "spy gear" you've stashed inside the housing of an electric mixmaster*, so you come up with the idea of telling the guy in charge that you have porn magazines in your suitcase and it would be SO embarrassing if anyone saw them, and of course you both laugh at that and he stops the search and lets you go.

Ugh.

Noah Emmerich's bad Israeli accent also didn't help.

* Of course it's never explained why a supposedly successful Syrian businessman has an electric mixer in his suitcase.

@sunnylea57 posted:

Started watching The Spy, an Israeli espionage drama based on a true story. Created by Gideon Raff who previously did Prisoners of War, the Israeli series that the first seasons of Homeland were based on. Starring Sacha Baron Cohen and Noah Emmerich. 

Gave up after 3 episodes. It should have come in yellow packaging and been called "No Name Spy Series". It had every silly spy trope imaginable.

Sneaking out of a party to scale the outside wall of the building, and breaking into the host's 3rd floor office to take microfilm photos of documents, and nearly getting caught when someone gets suspicious and checks the office.

Nervously sweating it out at the Syrian border because the border guards are examining your suitcases and you don't want them to find the "spy gear" you've stashed inside the housing of an electric mixmaster*, so you come up with the idea of telling the guy in charge that you have porn magazines in your suitcase and it would be SO embarrassing if anyone saw them, and of course you both laugh at that and he stops the search and lets you go.

Ugh.

Noah Emmerich's bad Israeli accent also didn't help.

* Of course it's never explained why a supposedly successful Syrian businessman has an electric mixer in his suitcase.

@sunnylea57 posted:

Started watching The Spy, an Israeli espionage drama based on a true story. Created by Gideon Raff who previously did Prisoners of War, the Israeli series that the first seasons of Homeland were based on. Starring Sacha Baron Cohen and Noah Emmerich. 

Gave up after 3 episodes. It should have come in yellow packaging and been called "No Name Spy Series". It had every silly spy trope imaginable.

Sneaking out of a party to scale the outside wall of the building, and breaking into the host's 3rd floor office to take microfilm photos of documents, and nearly getting caught when someone gets suspicious and checks the office.

Nervously sweating it out at the Syrian border because the border guards are examining your suitcases and you don't want them to find the "spy gear" you've stashed inside the housing of an electric mixmaster*, so you come up with the idea of telling the guy in charge that you have porn magazines in your suitcase and it would be SO embarrassing if anyone saw them, and of course you both laugh at that and he stops the search and lets you go.

Ugh.

Noah Emmerich's bad Israeli accent also didn't help.

* Of course it's never explained why a supposedly successful Syrian businessman has an electric mixer in his suitcase.

Interesting. I too tried and couldn’t connect. This genre is right up my alley but didn’t work for some reason. 

"Quiz" -- 30pts. 3 part mini-series on the "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" scandal in England in the 90s. It's simply horribly manipulative.

The show opens with a scene in a courtroom between the two sets of defendants they're at tells you the slant the show is going to take, then it settles down into the creation of the actual  quiz show itself. I found a lot of this interesting and I always seem to like things that Michael Sheen is in. The show then spends about an hour setting up strawmen which it's going to knock down in the final third episode. Besides having to believe, because of situations we see, the view point of the major and his wife. They are practically the definition of unreliable narrators. In addition, you have a number of ridiculous characters on the "bad guys" side including an absolutely impossible to believe, clueless lawyer for Celador. It just stacks the deck so hard.

Hey, if it's fiction, makeup any tale you want, but don't give me a fantasy version of actual occurrences.

Last edited by The Old Man
@purplehaze posted:

Two episodes into Giri / Haji on Netflix.  I like it so far.

PH

I had high hopes for this, but it just didn’t grab us. We moved onto other things after 3 episodes.

We really enjoyed the first season of Occupied (Okkupert). The second season isn’t quite as good, but still better than most series. We may have trouble finding S3, as it isn’t on Netflix here.

@winetarelli posted:

Perry Mason- Best new TV show. Starts slow but very well made and after 2 episodes I was hooked. And episode 3 was the best yet. 

 

Agreed-- it's really good. We thought first episode was already good, given that it's just setting the foundation for lots of anticipated plot twists to come. Haven't watched one since.

Being home a lot-- certainly more than any of the last 15 years-- and watching more TV than usual, we find ourselves in a bit of a quandary. We've gotten used to binge-watching any series that we've liked for the last couple of months. We think we may have lost the patience to wait for weekly episodes to air. We're debating whether to hold off on Perry Mason until the end of the season, or try to suffer through the breaks in continuity. First World Inter-Epidemic Problem.

And I hope that's as bad as it gets for any of us.

@seaquam posted:

Being home a lot-- certainly more than any of the last 15 years-- and watching more TV than usual, we find ourselves in a bit of a quandary. We've gotten used to binge-watching any series that we've liked for the last couple of months. We think we may have lost the patience to wait for weekly episodes to air. We're debating whether to hold off on Perry Mason until the end of the season, or try to suffer through the breaks in continuity. First World Inter-Epidemic Problem.

And I hope that's as bad as it gets for any of us.

When faced with this problem I've always just waited and watched the next episode when it's aired.  It breaks up the bingeing a little, and if I've forgotten any of the last episode I'll just watch the last 5 minutes or so and get back up to speed. 

PH 

Last edited by purplehaze
@purplehaze posted:

When faced with this problem I've always just waited and watched the next episode when it's aired.  It breaks up the bingeing a little, and if I've forgotten any of the last episode I'll just watch the last 5 minutes or so and get back up to speed. 

PH 

Yes. And they normally do a re-cap. It’s funny. I’ve also gotten used to bingeing, but I’m finding this refreshing. There is something nice about having to wait a week to look forward to the next installment. Especially right now, the concept of ‘looking forward to something happening next week’ is nice. 

@winetarelli posted:
@purplehaze posted:

When faced with this problem I've always just waited and watched the next episode when it's aired.  It breaks up the bingeing a little, and if I've forgotten any of the last episode I'll just watch the last 5 minutes or so and get back up to speed. 

PH 

Yes. And they normally do a re-cap. It’s funny. I’ve also gotten used to bingeing, but I’m finding this refreshing. There is something nice about having to wait a week to look forward to the next installment. Especially right now, the concept of ‘looking forward to something happening next week’ is nice. 

I think that’s cuz you guys are old and have learned patience.

I’m much younger. I’m pretty sure I’m part of the immediate gratification generation. We don’t wanna wait, mate!

I have found every episode to be better than its predecessor. FWIW.

But, to each his own.  I'm aware that Janet Maslin is in my camp, if that convinces whether or not to try it.  

 

While very different in many ways, it does have a stylized feel similar to Boardwalk Empire.  (And the primary director was also a major director of that show.)  But I don't find it distracting at all.

Last edited by winetarelli
@winetarelli posted:

While very different in many ways, it does have a stylized feel similar to Boardwalk Empire.  (And the primary director was also a major director of that show.)  But I don't find it distracting at all.

I couldn't get through more than three episodes of Boardwalk Empire for the same reason as this show--just trying too hard to create atmosphere.

"I'm aware that Janet Maslin is in my camp, if that convinces whether or not to try it"

Does nothing for me. I agree with this summary in Variety, "Too much of this show, a punishing eight installments, feels like yet another iteration of what we’ve seen already, elsewhere and often superior."

Last edited by The Old Man
@The Old Man posted:

I have nothing against nihilism, but in this case the word "needlessly" is correct. It's part of the show's piling on for effect.

Ah, sorry. I just thought I’d question  the least erudite term in a post that contained a lot of big fancy words. I sort of know the meaning of ‘needlessly’ and have even used it a couple of times in the past.

Anyway, it amused me to do so. Apparently, that’s where the amusement factor came to a complete halt.😀

@sunnylea57 posted:

I had high hopes for this, but it just didn’t grab us. We moved onto other things after 3 episodes.

We really enjoyed the first season of Occupied (Okkupert). The second season isn’t quite as good, but still better than most series. We may have trouble finding S3, as it isn’t on Netflix here.

Just finished season 3 of Occupied / Okkupert. Highly recommended.

@winetarelli posted:

Yep. Watched it. I was surprised by how good William Zabka is. Totally believable in that character, makes me wonder how mych of it (if any) is him playing himself. 

Love Zabka.  Between Karate Kid and Back to school,  career needs nothing else. We were at a concert once and a kid near us who was clearly not Zabka but looked like a combo of him and Spiccoli heard us making a Zabka reference about him and without missing a beat says Sweep the Leg and hilarious laughter followed 

Hundreds of studies have been devoted to the effects of mass communication, but scientists around the world are still arguing about both the possibilities and the mechanisms of the influence of television on a person. Most agree on one thing: the influence of television is not unlimited, but significant. Better to read something informative. For example, I often look at articles like https://www.light-it.net/blog/...of-iot-for-business/

Last edited by Hancock

On Amazon, oddly only until the end of the month, are some very early episodes of The Jack Benny Program. The first one is from the second season and is almost surrealistic in what occurs with the first guest Bob Crosby. Though they look like kinescopes to me I think you'll find some of Benny's great comedic talent still shines through. And of course his interplay with Rochester was ahead of its time.

@mneeley490 posted:

Finally got around to watching the first few episodes of Schitt's Creek. I guess I thought it would get better, but barely a chuckle after 90 minutes. I don't get the praise here. 

To me it's a gentle, clever, Canadian single-camera no laughtrack sitcom it's almost always enjoyable. Perhaps best to have discovered originally before so much hype. I think the performances are wonderful. For an old-timer like me , who used to waiting for Saturday Night Live to be over waiting for Second City TV to come on, I'm just a big fan of Eugene Levy, and particularly Catherine O'Hara. I think it's charming the David Levy gets to create more and more stories pushing, if you want to call it his "agenda." And Annie Murphy as his sister is always interesting to watch. Not a great show,  but just a nice change from so much slam-bang humor.

@The Old Man posted:

To me it's a gentle, clever, Canadian single-camera no laughtrack sitcom it's almost always enjoyable. Perhaps best to have discovered originally before so much hype. I think the performances are wonderful. For an old-timer like me , who used to waiting for Saturday Night Live to be over waiting for Second City TV to come on, I'm just a big fan of Eugene Levy, and particularly Catherine O'Hara. I think it's charming the David Levy gets to create more and more stories pushing, if you want to call it his "agenda." And Annie Murphy as his sister is always interesting to watch. Not a great show,  but just a nice change from so much slam-bang humor.

I realize that, and I was always a huge SCTV fan, also. But I think it could use at least a little humor to leaven the impact of not having a single character with any redeeming qualities. When I saw how badly Chris Elliott has aged, I nearly tossed my toast. 

@mneeley490 posted:

I realize that, and I was always a huge SCTV fan, also. But I think it could use at least a little humor to leaven the impact of not having a single character with any redeeming qualities. When I saw how badly Chris Elliott has aged, I nearly tossed my toast. 

I must tell you that except for Groundhog Day I'm really not a Chris Elliott fan and I really find him and his character annoying in the series. I tend to just look over those scenes. I ike the way the the characters' lives develop over the years. But I can certainly see people not going crazy over it, especially after all the hype.

Amazon Prime now has multiple seasons of Great British Menu. For anyone that enjoys cooking shows and cooking competition shows it's the best there is. No nonsense, little "made-up only for the viewers" drama and the chefs competing are usually Michelin starred. Regional heats then national finals across four course menus. So far from American TV it's funny. American cooking competition you have no skill prima donnas, here you have 2 star michelin chefs being shown washing down their work stations at the end of the day. 

Amazon Prime now has multiple seasons of Great British Menu. For anyone that enjoys cooking shows and cooking competition shows it's the best there is. No nonsense, little "made-up only for the viewers" drama and the chefs competing are usually Michelin starred. Regional heats then national finals across four course menus. So far from American TV it's funny. American cooking competition you have no skill prima donnas, here you have 2 star michelin chefs being shown washing down their work stations at the end of the day. 

I'll check it out, Rob. I love some of the Brit competition shows, my favourite being Portrait Artist of the Year. 

@mneeley490 posted:

Finally got around to watching the first few episodes of Schitt's Creek. I guess I thought it would get better, but barely a chuckle after 90 minutes. I don't get the praise here. 

You're not alone and as a Canadian I really wanted to like it. AFAIC Levy and O'Hara have been playing the same characters for decades and the style grates. Makes me cringe.

I'll take Emily Hampshire though.

I’m in the same camp re: Schitt’s Creek. When it first premiered, we couldn’t get past the first few episodes.

Currently watching Don’t Forget the Driver created and written by, and starring, Toby Jones. Recommended if you enjoy understated, droll British series. Not exactly a comedy. More of a quirky slice of life.

In the same vein, and even better, was Detectorists with Toby Jones and Mackenzie Crook (who also wrote and directed it). Highly recommended.

@sunnylea57 posted:

I’m in the same camp re: Schitt’s Creek. When it first premiered, we couldn’t get past the first few episodes.

Currently watching Don’t Forget the Driver created and written by, and starring, Toby Jones. Recommended if you enjoy understated, droll British series. Not exactly a comedy. More of a quirky slice of life.

In the same vein, and even better, was Detectorists with Toby Jones and Mackenzie Crook (who also wrote and directed it). Highly recommended.

Took me a few episodes to get into SCreek, but after that it took off and just kept getting better and better.  Turned into our favorite comedy.  The cast is great but especially love David Levy and Annie Murphy 

Watching Wild Card: The Downfall of a Radio Loudmouth. It's about Craig Carton, who I never heard of. The weird thing is that he thought he was the king of blackjack. There is no such thing. You either count cards, which at his level they would have spotted very quickly, or you play, as you should, basic strategy. There are no decisions to be made in blackjack. You either play by the mathematically optimized move or you're giving more money back to the casino if you don't.

How he ever the idea that he was a player who always beats the house I just don't get.

Last edited by The Old Man
@winetarelli posted:

I'm watching this new season of "The Boys" on Amazon.  I liked the first season, but maybe it is just COVID, but this new season is just so oppressively dark that it can be difficult at times.  It hasn't stopped me from watching, but next up I'm thinking I'll want something light and joyful.

What, ramming a speedboat through a sperm whale isn't light and joyful? Just finished season 2 (I think it was shortened due to COVID), and yeah, it was a little hard to watch in places.

If you've turn to Utopia, forget it. It's getting darker as it goes.

@winetarelli posted:

Franken seemed perfectly lucid to me.

‘Was Al Franken Drunk on Bill Maher?’ Twitter Users React to Live Interview

I thought this as I was watching and apparently a number of other people did too. I also have friends who wondered the same thing. For others here, watch the example in the link and tell me if he's lucid. "When you’re a parent, you often have to prepare food for kids. But, if you’re not- if you’re lazy about it, you can put it in the microwave, and the 7-year-old knows how to do that, and I’m saying it’s scientific fact, which it really isn’t, but we all know it is, and then the scientific fact, I went even further with the joke, and you know this, that it’s scientifically proven that a … 7-year-old can teach a 4-year-old."

This is a mild example. If it was supposed to be a joke that he's totally lost any comic ability (though I've never liked him either as a comedian, politician or pundit.) One friend speculated he had dementia, but I attribute it to alcohol because he didn't strike me as high. I almost thought it was possibly a mini-stroke, but we haven't heard anything so probably not.

Last edited by The Old Man

Yeah, I think it was just a joke that fell flat and he decided to double down to try to get laughs. The structure of the joke is exactly the way he has always structured jokes. The “slurring” is only in the context of demonstrated “etc”.  Absolutely nothing seems off to me about it. I mean, anything is possible, but this is nothing like other times I’ve seen obviously drunk people on talk shows.

Last edited by winetarelli
@winetarelli posted:

I mean, anything is possible, but this is nothing like other times I’ve seen obviously drunk people on talk shows.

It wasn't just the one "joke"; he was off in the entire interview. I guess I'll let this go, even though as I showed I'm not the only person who thought it. In addition, I'm speechless that you think the standard for how drunk he was is how drunk other people act on other shows.

More comic gold: "My answer to that is [if Trump won't leave office], that’s great. Because if he won’t leave, that means he lost. And he will be escorted out [by whom?], and I’ll pick him up and take him wherever he wants to go.”

Last edited by The Old Man
@g-man posted:

The Queen's Gambit on Netflix is a surprisingly engaging single season series,  the later episodes dragged a littlle but I'm glad it seems the director recognized this and brought it back to a fulfilling conclusion.

So much that it inspired to teach my kids some checkers before moving onto chess

Watching this with our 12 year old who has taken some chess classes, we are down to the last episode which we will probably watch tonight.  Very enjoyable.