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Presented by Bella Vino Wine Market, Indian Rocks Beach, Florida.

2006 Nozzole CCR
Lots of minerality, slate. Very dusty mature fruit. Light palate. C.

2008 Sette Ponti Crognolo
Big floral nose of roses and sugar cane. Medium balance. Dried cherries. Short length. Likely way to young. Nose seems to portend a better presentation in a few years. B with potential.

2004 Silvio Nardi Brunello di Montalcino
Dusty, musty attic nose. Fresh fruit with lots of skins. Black cherries and an off-putting green stems note on finish. C.

2008 Tenuta san Guido "Guidoalberto"
Nose of sweet blueberries. Candied fruits and blueberry palate. Maraschino cherries. Tannins not connected to rest of wine, still disintegrated. A- with potential.

2007 Tenuta san Guido "Sassacaia"
A wine I have yet to understand or perhaps appreciate. Tastes like your basic drinkable chianti. Nice semi-sweet, semi-tart cherries. Average length. Average depth. Not overly interesting. Must have a distinct following to command $200 a bottle. I have never drunk any truly aged bottles so maybe I am just misinformed. ??

Ardeis in Seminole
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quote:
Originally posted by Ardeis:
2007 Tenuta san Guido "Sassacaia"
A wine I have yet to understand or perhaps appreciate. Tastes like your basic drinkable chianti. Nice semi-sweet, semi-tart cherries. Average length. Average depth. Not overly interesting. Must have a distinct following to command $200 a bottle. I have never drunk any truly aged bottles so maybe I am just misinformed. ??

Ardeis in Seminole


Thank you for the notes.

I don't know who would have informed you to drink it young. I've only had this a couple of times with significant age on them. I know the "basic Chianti" taste that you speak of, and the Sass. wines I had were anything but.

And, as for the Nardi. You had it, but perhaps it was corked?
I too think you had an off bottle. I tasted an '04 Nardi and thought it was a great wine, though my personal preference is for more time in the bottle for Brunellos. The Sassicaia is another story. I think poppping the cork on a Sass before 8-10 years of age is a big mistake. Had an '88 recently that rocked. Blackberry, vanilla, substantial weight on the palate. I don't get the Chianti reference either. To me, Sass tastes about as much like "basic Chianti" as a Latour. Though there's a rustic nature to Sass, there are none of the Sangiovese aromas or flavors. Now, if you were talking about Tignanello, which has Sangiovese in it along with CS and CF, I'd get the commonality.
Last edited by oenolvr
I don't think the faults I am referring to amount to a bad bottle, ie corked or TCA. This might be due to bottle variation. Just a strong hint of green leaves near the finish.

As for chianti's.....what I usually drink in most number are the Fontodi's and Fonterutoli lineups. Also some Brancaia.

My feeling was sometimes a wine in need of a lot of bottle time has still an inticing nose that seems to hint of things to come but this Sass really didn't have anything I would consider worthy of a $200 pricetag.
I do appreciate your Sass comments.....again I didn't pull the cork---it was part of retailer's tasting. I was fishing for some idea what to expect from this wine because I didn't pick up any signs of greatness. Likewise no one in our group of about 20 seemed to have much older Sass knowledge.....again thanks for descriptors.
quote:
Originally posted by Ardeis:
My feeling was sometimes a wine in need of a lot of bottle time has still an inticing nose that seems to hint of things to come but this Sass really didn't have anything I would consider worthy of a $200 pricetag.

Ardeis, I'll agree with you that Sassicaia's price tag is now generally beyond what I'm will to pay for it, but for very special 'worthy' vintages. Not every vintage is worth that coin.

For $200 you should be able to source a '98 Sassi and that bottle, if it shows well, will be worth every penny you paid for it.

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