Pronouncing the Chateaux of Bordeaux correctly

That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.


Late reply, but if anyone is still paying attention, I believe it is a dialect or old pronounciation of Cos, specific to Cos d'Estournel. It's a traditional pronounication that is still used. French, like English, has many exceptions to the rules, this being one of them. Normally, the s at the end of a sentance is silent unless it is followed by an e, or if the next word in a sentence begins with a vowel, then the s sounds like a -z.
quote:
Originally posted by Roentgen Ray:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.


Late reply, but if anyone is still paying attention, I believe it is a dialect or old pronounciation of Cos, specific to Cos d'Estournel. It's a traditional pronounication that is still used. French, like English, has many exceptions to the rules, this being one of them. Normally, the s at the end of a sentance is silent unless it is followed by an e, or if the next word in a sentence begins with a vowel, then the s sounds like a -z.


Yes. You are correct. The "s" at the end of Cos D'estournel is pronounced(ie not silent) unlike Cos Labory which is silent. No rule, just tradition as RR mentioned.
quote:
Originally posted by Roentgen Ray:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.


Late reply, but if anyone is still paying attention, I believe it is a dialect or old pronounciation of Cos, specific to Cos d'Estournel. It's a traditional pronounication that is still used. French, like English, has many exceptions to the rules, this being one of them. Normally, the s at the end of a sentance is silent unless it is followed by an e, or if the next word in a sentence begins with a vowel, then the s sounds like a -z.


This is true, and sometimes it depends on both local habits and indivudal habits..I guess all the pronouciations are fine, as long as the listening bodys well understand !
Remember that Bordeaux was once an English possession, and the historical development of the Bordeaux wine trade is deeply intertwined with the English. Many of the current or former owners have deep British roots. Therefore, it is not suprising that some of the oldest and most famous estates have an Anglicized aspect to their name.

Burgundy is the opposite, as it is landlocked and was insulated from essentially all British influence, so the names are purely French.
Love it. Thanks for the bump!

On a similar note, you can find audio clips for every Burgundy appellation here. Not as convenient as the Bordeaux site, but still very useful. I think the Burgundy appellation names are easier to mispronounce than Bordeaux.

http://www.bourgogne-wines.com...-nuits,225,168.html?

That link is for the Côte de Nuits. The links to the pages for the Côte de Beaune, Côte Chalonnaise, Chablis, Mâconnais and Chatillonais are at the top of the right-hand column.

Scroll down on each of those pages, and you'll find links for each appellation. Click through on each appellations, and the audio clips are in the right hand column below the maps. Male and female.

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