Premox or cooked on a white?

Recently had a 2005 Trimbach Pinot Gris reserve that was very obviously flawed. I told the store manager that it was heat damage, but later thought it is possible the wine was premoxed. Very bright straw yellow, a very strong dry sherry flavor, and bitter acidity...a strong sourness. Medium sweetness still very present. My thought was that this was cooked at some point. Correct? What are telltale signs of Premox or cooked wines regarding whites? I didn't think the bright straw yellow was any indication or effect of the flaw.
The retailer took back the bottle and gave me in-store credit...'great and thanks.'
TIA, G-
Original Post
They're not the same. "Strong dry sherry flavor" could mean several things. You mean like a fino? Maybe some VA? Or do you mean like an oloroso, in which case that would suggest oxidation. That gives it a kind of metallic note and maybe some caramel. Hard to describe but unmistakable when you get it.

Cooked is different entirely. Cooked is cooked. It can taste like stewed fruit. Sourness has nothing to do with either.

I think the issue was just that it was a 2005 Pinot Gris from Alsace.
Coulda had some bacteria in it that just made it vinegar

doesnt have to do with either heat or premox.

dirty bottles sometimes. your descirption makes it sound like it might be.

oh and process

Bacteria + ethanol (alcohol in the wine) -> Acetic acid + water.

so residual sugars stays pretty much the same but the acetic acid is very apparently and you lose out on some of the phenols because teh alcohol has been fermented away.
Good point g-man.

In fact, some bacteria, like acetic acid bacteria, can form aldehydes by oxidizing some of the alcohol produced by the yeast. Some yeasts produce those as well. That's part of what gives a fino its distinctive nose so if you don't get the kind of caramel notes you'd get from open-air oxidiation, it's also a kind of oxidation but the result is based on the yeast or bacteria as g-man said.

And just as he points out, that's not something you take care of by using a better stopper - dirty facilities at any point along the line can do it. If it's in the winery, it can be expensive and tough to clean out.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
Good point g-man.

In fact, some bacteria, like acetic acid bacteria, can form aldehydes by oxidizing some of the alcohol produced by the yeast. Some yeasts produce those as well. That's part of what gives a fino its distinctive nose so if you don't get the kind of caramel notes you'd get from open-air oxidiation, it's also a kind of oxidation but the result is based on the yeast or bacteria as g-man said.

And just as he points out, that's not something you take care of by using a better stopper - dirty facilities at any point along the line can do it. If it's in the winery, it can be expensive and tough to clean out.


or,

"2005 Pinot Gris from Alsace."

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