As a general rule, is there a certain age of wine that is typically a sweet spot? I'm starting to get more experience and I'm finding that I prefer a less expensive, older wine over a younger, more expensive wine, even when the younger wine is purportedly "ready to drink." I haven't delved into any wines that are considered "past their prime" yet, as far as I know. But I have really been enjoying wines that are about ten years old. I bought a range of wines yesterday of ages 8 to 12 years old, and I will be trying them out all week. But as a rule of thumb, since a lot of the less pricey wines don't have much info online, is there an age range in which wine is likely ready to drink but not past it's prime?
Original Post
No, there aren't really any general rules. It depends on a lot of things:

1) Grape varietal (Some grape types benefit a lot with age, others don't)
2) If you prefer primary, or secondary, or even tertiary flavors (not everyone likes old wine)
3) Style of the producer (some make backwards, long-lived wines, others ready to go)
4) Vintage (certain vintages shut down for a time, others are more friendly)

If you have a specific region in mind you'll probably get more direction. Also, 98% of wine is meant to be consumed in the first year or so. Very little wine benefits from age. It can seem different based on what wines people talk about here but you have to remember that people here are definitely in the minority of wine drinkers as a whole.
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
No, there aren't really any general rules. It depends on a lot of things:

1) Grape varietal (Some grape types benefit a lot with age, others don't)
2) If you prefer primary, or secondary, or even tertiary flavors (not everyone likes old wine)
3) Style of the producer (some make backwards, long-lived wines, others ready to go)
4) Vintage (certain vintages shut down for a time, others are more friendly)

If you have a specific region in mind you'll probably get more direction. Also, 98% of wine is meant to be consumed in the first year or so. Very little wine benefits from age. It can seem different based on what wines people talk about here but you have to remember that people here are definitely in the minority of wine drinkers as a whole.


Great response Danyull.

And, unlike what GregT suggested, for me, anything beyond 10 days out of the barrel starts to taste funky and decrepit to me!!
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
No, there aren't really any general rules. It depends on a lot of things:

1) Grape varietal (Some grape types benefit a lot with age, others don't)
2) If you prefer primary, or secondary, or even tertiary flavors (not everyone likes old wine)
3) Style of the producer (some make backwards, long-lived wines, others ready to go)
4) Vintage (certain vintages shut down for a time, others are more friendly)

If you have a specific region in mind you'll probably get more direction...

Well said. When asked if I like 'old wines,' my response is, "I like old wines that taste young... and conversely young wines that taste old." Specifically on the point of the producer's style, I usually prefer Brunello with at least a decade of age on it (as much for the acidity as for the tannins), but there are producers - Fuligni comes to mind - where their young wines aren't so tannic, and yet they exhibit enough secondary flavors that they're not just fruit bombs. At the same time, their BdM with 2 decades on it still seems fresh and lively. Only time and experience will reveal to you what really matters to your palate. What a magnificent adventure!
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
No, there aren't really any general rules. It depends on a lot of things:

1) Grape varietal (Some grape types benefit a lot with age, others don't)
2) If you prefer primary, or secondary, or even tertiary flavors (not everyone likes old wine)
3) Style of the producer (some make backwards, long-lived wines, others ready to go)
4) Vintage (certain vintages shut down for a time, others are more friendly)

If you have a specific region in mind you'll probably get more direction. Also, 98% of wine is meant to be consumed in the first year or so. Very little wine benefits from age. It can seem different based on what wines people talk about here but you have to remember that people here are definitely in the minority of wine drinkers as a whole.


Yes your points give a clear idea perfect answer about wine age,

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