Discovererd this grape varietal indigenous to the Loire Valley over the weekend in Brooklyn. It seems that this grape dates back to the middle ages and was often pulled out of the ground to make way for more decent grape types. According to Jancis Robinson in her "Guide to Wine Grapes,"It's not a member of the Pinot family, though it is "Red Chenin Blanc," although Loire growers sometimes give it the alternate name "Chenin Noir."
Original Post
Look at you! (Something suggested by Chris?)

Rhymes with? (Although probably not related.)

Not grown much anymore. (With good reason IMO.)

I think it's older than chenin blanc, which was supposedly derived from it. But where is your tasting note? Or are you still writing?
Tasted it at Prospect wines...

Tasting notes are that there are alot of hints of green pepper...very pronounced...decent but not sure if I would purchase a bottle...
lol you kill me. Big Grin was this before or after you discovered 5 guys? Popcorn

quote:
Originally posted by mareff:
Discovererd this grape varietal indigenous to the Loire Valley over the weekend in Brooklyn.
quote:
Originally posted by TBird:
lol you kill me. Big Grin was this before or after you discovered 5 guys? Popcorn

quote:
Originally posted by mareff:
Discovererd this grape varietal indigenous to the Loire Valley over the weekend in Brooklyn.


as in the burger joint from washington dc?
I tasted some the other day. I get a lot of black peppercorns. I would best compare it to a cross between a Shiraz and Gamay. I think SMoked pork goes well with this. It is definitely an acquired tasting wine.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×