Skip to main content

Happy holidays to all.  Will be a strange set of holidays for sure.  We are zooming our seders with others.  I made charoset, which typically calls for sweet red wine, of which I had none. So, I opened a bottle of Amarone, which isn't sweet, but has that raisiny quality. Seems to work well.

Next year will be better, I hope.

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

irwin posted:

Happy holidays to all.  Will be a strange set of holidays for sure.  We are zooming our seders with others.  I made charoset, which typically calls for sweet red wine, of which I had none. So, I opened a bottle of Amarone, which isn't sweet, but has that raisiny quality. Seems to work well.

Next year will be better, I hope.

An office friend brought in some charoset last year to share. First time this goyum had ever heard of it. Delicious! He used a ruby port in his. 

mneeley490 posted:
irwin posted:

Happy holidays to all.  Will be a strange set of holidays for sure.  We are zooming our seders with others.  I made charoset, which typically calls for sweet red wine, of which I had none. So, I opened a bottle of Amarone, which isn't sweet, but has that raisiny quality. Seems to work well.

Next year will be better, I hope.

An office friend brought in some charoset last year to share. First time this goyum had ever heard of it. Delicious! He used a ruby port in his. 

Singular is Goy.  Goyim is plural.  Hebrew and yiddush grammar police.  Just kidding and informational

jcocktosten posted:
mneeley490 posted:
irwin posted:

Happy holidays to all.  Will be a strange set of holidays for sure.  We are zooming our seders with others.  I made charoset, which typically calls for sweet red wine, of which I had none. So, I opened a bottle of Amarone, which isn't sweet, but has that raisiny quality. Seems to work well.

Next year will be better, I hope.

An office friend brought in some charoset last year to share. First time this goyum had ever heard of it. Delicious! He used a ruby port in his. 

Singular is Goy.  Goyim is plural.  Hebrew and yiddush grammar police.  Just kidding and informational

Sorry. It was a lame and uneducated attempt at humor. I meant no offense.

Last edited by mneeley490
mneeley490 posted:
jcocktosten posted:
mneeley490 posted:
irwin posted:

Happy holidays to all.  Will be a strange set of holidays for sure.  We are zooming our seders with others.  I made charoset, which typically calls for sweet red wine, of which I had none. So, I opened a bottle of Amarone, which isn't sweet, but has that raisiny quality. Seems to work well.

Next year will be better, I hope.

An office friend brought in some charoset last year to share. First time this goyum had ever heard of it. Delicious! He used a ruby port in his. 

Singular is Goy.  Goyim is plural.  Hebrew and yiddush grammar police.  Just kidding and informational

Sorry. It was a lame and uneducated attempt at humor. I meant no offense.

No, no, no, I don't in anyway think anyone took offense. I only recently learned this about the word and find its origins very interesting. As I said it is sometimes in the Torah and used to refer simply to a nation, even the soon to be Israelites. 

BTW, the song The Israelites (1968) by Desmond Dekker is the first true reggae song to ever be in the "Top 10." We certainly didn't know what reggae was, but I bought, and still have ,the 45. For extra points, without looking it up, can you come up with the song and artist who had the first hit ska song? It's actually earlier (1964) than The Israelites.

Last edited by The Old Man

Salmon/Red Grouper Fish Terrine (a/k/a gefilte fish but not really)

Chicken soup with matzoh balls

Brisket and potatoes in gravy

Assorted macaroons and brownies for desert (care package from Stef's mom)

and the ritual food and wine elements

Don't know what we are opening yet - normally at parents' house would be kosher wine but we are free from that tonight.

Both our families opted out of Zoom seder -so we are joining our friends and their family's

The Old Man posted:
csm posted:

Making a brisket for my Jewish wife and child for this evening.  Also getting my sourdough starter activated for leftover brisket sandwiches for lunch tomorrow for me, the Goyim in the household. 

Goyim is plural. It's a feminine noun that takes the masculine ending when plural.

 

Putz.

The Old Man posted:
csm posted:

Making a brisket for my Jewish wife and child for this evening.  Also getting my sourdough starter activated for leftover brisket sandwiches for lunch tomorrow for me, the Goyim in the household. 

Goyim is plural. It's a feminine noun that takes the masculine ending when plural.

Irregardless. 

jcocktosten posted:
vint posted:
The Old Man posted:
csm posted:

Making a brisket for my Jewish wife and child for this evening.  Also getting my sourdough starter activated for leftover brisket sandwiches for lunch tomorrow for me, the Goyim in the household. 

Goyim is plural. It's a feminine noun that takes the masculine ending when plural.

 

Putz.

Singular

The Old Man posted:
vint posted:
The Old Man posted:
csm posted:

Making a brisket for my Jewish wife and child for this evening.  Also getting my sourdough starter activated for leftover brisket sandwiches for lunch tomorrow for me, the Goyim in the household. 

Goyim is plural. It's a feminine noun that takes the masculine ending when plural.

 

Putz.

Am I being name called because I pointed out some Hebrew grammar? I'd almost call it anti-Semitic.

Wow.  Accused of being anti-Semitic. At 55 years old, a lifetime first for me.

I've had the unmitigated pleasure of breaking bread with many from this forum and I believe to a person they'd describe me to be about as easy-going as it gets. Before we shared wine, I didn't ask their religion, race, sexual orientation, politics or anything else because quite frankly I could care less. So let's set aside that wildly inaccurate accusation for now and talk about why I called you a putz. 

I love your posts about art and architecture but especially those about film. Not only do you share your encyclopedic knowledge and tell stories about the people who inspire, make, and watch films but also use that unparalleled depth of subject matter expertise to include coincidental trivia about where people are buried and who lived near whom. It's great stuff. I learn something every time.

Other posts, not so much. It's like you can't help yourself from hitting the Post Reply button before running it through the "Does this add value to the conversation, or will it make me come across as an overbearing pedant?" filter.

More to the point, csm's post was nice. He's not Jewish but was cooking to honour the traditions for his wife and daughter. And maybe sneaking in a sandwich or two for himself. He threw in a Yiddish word for fun. You could have commented, like mneeley490 did, on the substance, theme or content of the post.  Or you could have said nothing at all. Instead, you called him out on a grammatical error for the Yiddish word. Was that truly necessary? It's clearly not his native language, and my guess one in which he has not spent much time learning proper usage and grammar rules. But you didn't care - you had to set things right and show the world you knew better.

Your own posts are rife with spelling mistakes. How would you feel if, after every brilliant, erudite post on film or art, I commented not on the substance of your post but instead on whatever spelling errors you'd made?  After a while, I'm guessing you'd start to think "Man, this vint is an asshole. A nitpicker. Or even maybe...a putz." Did I have to use the Yiddish word?  Nope.  But I thought it somehow appropriate given the nature of the conversation and believed others might see the irony.    

You can fire back, but I won't respond further on this particular subject. I hope one day we get the opprtunity to raise a glass together. I truly mean that. 

vint posted:
The Old Man posted:
vint posted:
The Old Man posted:
csm posted:

Making a brisket for my Jewish wife and child for this evening.  Also getting my sourdough starter activated for leftover brisket sandwiches for lunch tomorrow for me, the Goyim in the household. 

Goyim is plural. It's a feminine noun that takes the masculine ending when plural.

 

Putz.

Am I being name called because I pointed out some Hebrew grammar? I'd almost call it anti-Semitic.

Wow.  Accused of being anti-Semitic. At 55 years old, a lifetime first for me.

I've had the unmitigated pleasure of breaking bread with many from this forum and I believe to a person they'd describe me to be about as easy-going as it gets. Before we shared wine, I didn't ask their religion, race, sexual orientation, politics or anything else because quite frankly I could care less. So let's set aside that wildly inaccurate accusation for now and talk about why I called you a putz. 

I love your posts about art and architecture but especially those about film. Not only do you share your encyclopedic knowledge and tell stories about the people who inspire, make, and watch films but also use that unparalleled depth of subject matter expertise to include coincidental trivia about where people are buried and who lived near whom. It's great stuff. I learn something every time.

Other posts, not so much. It's like you can't help yourself from hitting the Post Reply button before running it through the "Does this add value to the conversation, or will it make me come across as an overbearing pedant?" filter.

More to the point, csm's post was nice. He's not Jewish but was cooking to honour the traditions for his wife and daughter. And maybe sneaking in a sandwich or two for himself. He threw in a Yiddish word for fun. You could have commented, like mneeley490 did, on the substance, theme or content of the post.  Or you could have said nothing at all. Instead, you called him out on a grammatical error for the Yiddish word. Was that truly necessary? It's clearly not his native language, and my guess one in which he has not spent much time learning proper usage and grammar rules. But you didn't care - you had to set things right and show the world you knew better.

Your own posts are rife with spelling mistakes. How would you feel if, after every brilliant, erudite post on film or art, I commented not on the substance of your post but instead on whatever spelling errors you'd made?  After a while, I'm guessing you'd start to think "Man, this vint is an asshole. A nitpicker. Or even maybe...a putz." Did I have to use the Yiddish word?  Nope.  But I thought it somehow appropriate given the nature of the conversation and believed others might see the irony.    

You can fire back, but I won't respond further on this particular subject. I hope one day we get the opprtunity to raise a glass together. I truly mean that. 

Amen - well said J and yes, you are about as easy-going as it gets!

Hope everyone enjoys this season as best they can given the circumstances.

Last edited by Vino Bevo

I was gonna post something in vint’s defence  earlier but changed my mind. He responded brilliantly. He is one of the truly nicer, friendlier and most welcoming humans I’ve had the pleasure to meet. Even better that I’ve gotten to have his company multiple times.

TOM, I feel bad that you choose to find misery and feel anger as often as you do. Hopefully your daughter has had the benefit of another adult’s influence in her life. A balance to your constant negativity would be essential. Sorry if I rained on your parade for expressing thoughts about an internet stranger. 

vint posted:
The Old Man posted:
vint posted:
The Old Man posted:
csm posted:

Making a brisket for my Jewish wife and child for this evening.  Also getting my sourdough starter activated for leftover brisket sandwiches for lunch tomorrow for me, the Goyim in the household. 

Goyim is plural. It's a feminine noun that takes the masculine ending when plural.

 

Putz.

 

 

More to the point, csm's post was nice. He's not Jewish but was cooking to honour the traditions for his wife and daughter. And maybe sneaking in a sandwich or two for himself. He threw in a Yiddish word for fun. You could have commented, like mneeley490 did, on the substance, theme or content of the post.  Or you could have said nothing at all. Instead, you called him out on a grammatical error for the Yiddish word. Was that truly necessary? It's clearly not his native language, and my guess one in which he has not spent much time learning proper usage and grammar rules. But you didn't care - you had to set things right and show the world you knew better.

I think my reputation sets me up for this. I appreciated csm's making dinner. While I certainly enjoy, sometimes, being a grammar policeman, this was not the case here. When I grammar police it's for people who should know better. People who know the difference between "advice" and "advise." There is no way I expected csm to know anything about Hebrew grammar. (Also FWIW it's not Yiddish but biblical Hebrew.) So I was not correcting his grammar. Again, because I didn't think he already knew Hebrew so there was no grammar to correct. I was just having fun because I've been studying Hebrew for about a 1 1/2 years now and find it interesting how their plurals work. (Though Jewish I didn't even know the letters of a dreidel two years ago.) I particularly find the word "Goy" interesting because I only learned about a month ago that it is not a derogatory term (though it's used that way often today) but, as I said, simply means "nation." I thought that was interesting. In addition I think the male plural ending on a feminine noun was interesting.

My reply to you was in response, as I said, for being name-called for bringing out an interesting facet of the Hebrew language. I just couldn't understand why you were doing it so that led me to me (apparently incorrect) conclusion. I will be deleting the posts I'm able to.

(I usually do proofread at least once before posting, I haven't in this case because I have in ten minutes my, now online, Hebrew study group!)  Also I have been called out on grammar errors here before and I never mind. Frequently, and I can find you recent examples of my errors being called out and I usually respond with a "Doh!" meaning I'm sorry I missed it. Also I have learned here of words I've misused and actually enjoy learning to improve.

Executive summary: I was not attacking csm for not knowing Hebrew grammar, I was not attacking anyone at all, I was simply making an interesting (to me and to others who might not know) observation about Hebrew grammar.

Last edited by The Old Man

Good good - let's get back on track - Good Friday tomorrow.  Easter Sunday

Those who do a second seder - like us - tonight.  Repeat of yesterday's menu - we have convinced Stef's parents to Zoom seder with us tonight.  Trying to get my sister to join.  My dad - the Rabbi- steadfastly refuses for some reason (not religious)

Drinking the rest of the Fall Line and the Chianti we used for Elijah's cup 

irwin posted:

I have no idea what was potentially offensive in these posts. I'm just clueless. And, I don't care to really know.  It's sort of amazing that on a wine forum we're discussing the intricacy of Hebrew grammar.  I started the thread to be pleasant and to wish people good holiday greetings. Geez.

Happy Easter and Passover to all.  Hopefully we can enjoy a day of celebration or family get togethers!  Cheers to Irwin and others on the board.

irwin posted:

I have no idea what was potentially offensive in these posts. I'm just clueless. And, I don't care to really know.  It's sort of amazing that on a wine forum we're discussing the intricacy of Hebrew grammar.

There was nothing offensive. It was a misunderstanding that I believe has been cleared up.

"It's sort of amazing that on a wine forum we're discussing the intricacy of Hebrew grammar."

Much more than just wine is discussed daily on this forum. In fact, at this point it may be mostly non-wine talk.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×