Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

This recipe is excellent. You can substitute rabbit for the chicken.

6 cups very strong chicken broth (bouillon)
½ teaspoon saffron
¼ teaspoon pimentón(smoked paprika)
1 small onion, peeled
2 small chickens, about 2 ½ each
coarse salt
½ cup olive oil
¼ pound cooking chorizo sausage, in ¼ inch slices
1 large pork chop, boned and diced
¼ pound piece jamón serrano, diced
1 medium onion, chopped
4 scallions chopped
4 tbs. chopped garlic
2 roasted piquillo peppers
1 pound small or medium shrimp, shelled
2 live lobsters, boiled, split and divided into tail sections and claws (discard or keep the head and small claws); or 4 lobsters tails, split lengthwise; or 8 king crab claws; or 8 jumbo shrimp, in their shells
3 cups Bomba rice
5 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 bay leaves, crumbled
½ cup dry white wine
¼ pound fresh or frozen peas
18 calms and/or mussels, scrubbed
lemon wedges for garnish
parsley for garnish
Preparation Instructions:
Heat the broth with the saffron, pimentón and the whole onion. Cover and simmer 15 minutes.
Remove the onion and measure the broth – you need exactly 5 ½ cups.
Cut the chickens into small serving pieces- the whole breast in 4 parts, each thigh into 2 parts, the bony tip of the leg chopped off, the wing tip discarded, and the rest of the wing separated into 2 parts. Dry the pieces well and sprinkle with salt.
In a metal Paella pan, with about a 15 inch base, heat the oil. Add the chicken pieces and fry over high heat until golden. Remove to a warm platter.
Add the chorizo, pork, and jamón to the pan and stir fry about 10 minutes.
Add the chopped onion, scallions, garlic, and pimientos and sauté until the onion is wilted.
Add the shrimp and the lobster and sauté about 3 minutes more, or until the shrimp and lobster barely turn pink ( the lobster will cook more in the oven). Remove the shrimp and lobster to the platter with the chicken.
Add the rice to the pan and stir to coat it well with the oil. Sprinkle in the 5 tablespoon chopped parsley and the crumbled bay leaves. (You can make in advance up to this point.)
Stir in the chicken broth, boiling hot, the wine, rice, and peas. Salt to taste.
Bring to a boil and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, over medium-high heat about 10 minutes.
Bury the shrimp and the chicken in the rice. Add the clams and the mussels, pushing them into the rice, with the edge that will open facing up.
Decorate the paella with the lobster pieces, then bake at 325 F, uncovered, for 20 minutes.
Remove from the oven and let sit on top of the stove, lightly covered with foil, for about 10 minutes.
To serve, decorate with lemon wedges and chopped parsley. Lobster can be a little expensive, so replace it with a comparable amount of shrimp if you wish.

por vino
When in Spain, I found that rose (DRY rose) wines paired very well with rice dishes, specifically a lot of different paellas.

As long as you go easy on the saffran.

Navarra makes a lot of good rosados, mostly based on Garnacha, but there was once producer who made a rosado out of Cabernet Sauvignon which was in a leageof its own. Unfortunately I cannot remmeber the name of the producer.
Paella, when well done, is fantastic. But to get the rice just right is pretty difficult. Should be almost crunchy at the bottom.

One thing though, while most spanish guys I know hardly can boil pasta, they all seem to figure when it comes to paella, they're Jean Pierre White. A bit like BBQ over here. It's a man's job. No matter how charred the meat becomes...
Knowing how to make good paella is to know the process, not a recipe. In my business I regularly cook large (3 foot diameter paelleras) paellas with great success.

Random thoughts:

- Caramelize your vegetables. It really helps develop and deepen the flavor of the final dish. Understand that there is a "hot" phase in cooking, when the temperature of the pan is well above boiling, and a "cool" phase, which occurs after you add liquid or anything which renders a quantity of liquid. Use that to your advantage.

- Try to make it without using an oven. The textural crunch of the browned rice on the bottom of the pan is important.

- Add fresh rosemary to emulate the flavor of cooking over an open fire, which is traditional.

- Originally paella did not contain seafood. The dish was developed in the mountains of Spain where pork and rabbit reigned. The first seafood added was probably eel, but when the concept made it to Valencia they figured out a real good thing.
quote:
Originally posted by PURPLE:
What is Bomba rice?

I am making a paella next week for the first time and the receipe calls for Jasmine rice. I thought that was a little weird. I thougth Jasmine was oriental.

FYI, i'm pairing a Numanthia (spelling?)


I strongly disagree with the use of Jasmine rice for cooking a Paella. As you say it's an oriental kind of rice with a flavour and a smell very... oriental Wink It's a very nice rice, but absolutely not for a Paella.
Bomba rice is another kind of rice. Its shape is more rounded than the usual "long" shape of the rice. This is a good kind of rice for making Paellas (of course), risottos and melty rices... yum, yum... Big Grin
Btw, I think that the Numanthia will be so strong to pair with a Paella... but who knows? Wink Wink

Cheers,

GusOK
In the mountains of Murcia is a region around the town of Calasparra that grows an ancient strain of rice that matures very slowly. The mature rice is exceedingly lacking in water, and absorbs three times its volume in broth rather than twice, as is the case with the rice that we are used to. Rice from the Calasparra region has been assigned Denomination of Origen status in recognition its unique characteristics and high production standards. Of the two types of classic rice grown in Calasparra, Bomba is the supreme strain. Until recently it was a variety that had all but disappeared because of the intensive care it needs to grow. Chefs, however, created a demand, and today Bomba is once more cultivated for the pleasure of discriminating food lovers. The basic difference between Bomba rice and others is that Bomba does not expand longitudinally, like other rice strains, but in width, like an accordion. It does not become pasty after cooking, as typically happens with other short grain rices (other than its sister Calasparra rice). It has a wonderful consistency and flavor. When only the best of the best will do. Note: You will need a third more water or broth than for regular rice. Ratio - 3:1
quote:
Originally posted by PURPLE:
Thank for saving me from mis-using the Numanthia. That probably would have been a bad pairing in hind sight.

Now I gotta figure out what to have with Numanthia.

Bomba rice is apparently quite a speciality item and didn't see any at the store.


Hi Purple,
and what about the Paella? Was it a complete success? Cool

Regarding the Numanthia... hmmm... something strong... hmm.. deer, wild boar.. Cool

And regarding the Bomba rice, as Winebibber told you, is a rice with DO, so... yes it's a bit special. Maybe if you have any kind of Gourmet shop near of you they have it or can find it for you...

Cheers,

GusOK
Last edited {1}
My Paella turned out pretty good.

I used a braising pan.

The Numanthia-as an afterthought- I looked on the Numanthia website and Roast was recommended.

Which sends me off on another subject-wild game. You would think I could buy some deer meat retail in Ft Worth Texas but I haven't had any luck. Nor have I found Wild Boar. Bison and rattlesnake yes but not venison.
When done right, I find Paella to be the best dish ever created! I like to include good quality chorizo (I get mine from Whole Foods).

A tip on saffron- M & J Greider's in Pennslvania makes fantastic saffron at a reasonable price ($3.99 for 0.5 grams, enough for Paella for 8). You can get it at www.pageneralstore.com or at the Reading Terminal Market if you live in Philadelphia.

As for wine, a bright, zesty New Zealand Sauvingnon Blanc can stand up to the flavors of Paella without overwhelming.

Vita Excolatur
When home in Cancun the paella is cooked outside over a wood fire using the traditional pan and it's hard to beat the beachside ambience. Saffron, clams, Gulf shrimp, cracked stone crab claws, cuttlefish, chicken breasts and wings, baccalao (just a bit), etc. ... usually twice per winter.

Too bad this custom isn't more universal; makes me ask myself what they'd do in Afghanistan if food, not warring was the day's foremost topic of thought for all of them.

Sorry for the geopolitical insert; the paella is just so good it made me diffuse! Cool
Going to Jaleo in Las Vegas this Friday for the Paella Festival. Interested in trying a seafood Paella. I'll either go with one with mixed seafood (fish and shellfish), or one with lobster, monkfish and squid. Not quite sure what the difference will be between them.

If anyone out there has had a straight seafood Paella before, what wine have you found to be a good match?
here's a recipe i've been tempted to try out.

Smoked meat paella.

In a paella pan, add beef stock, paprika (or saffron if you can afford it), rice and andouille sausages along with some onions and peppers.

place at bottom of smoker stack, on top of that put some dry rubbed pork ribs, brined chicken and some beef brisket.

Let the whole thing smoke for 10 hours.

I haven't worked out the dynamics and how to actually implement such dish yet, but i've got ideas!
quote:
Originally posted by Oenolvr:
Going to Jaleo in Las Vegas this Friday for the Paella Festival. Interested in trying a seafood Paella. I'll either go with one with mixed seafood (fish and shellfish), or one with lobster, monkfish and squid. Not quite sure what the difference will be between them.

If anyone out there has had a straight seafood Paella before, what wine have you found to be a good match?


The last time I made paella it was almost all seafood. We drank rose and Albarino. It was a pretty large group and this seemed to work pretty well.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
here's a recipe i've been tempted to try out.

Smoked meat paella.

In a paella pan, add beef stock, paprika (or saffron if you can afford it), rice and andouille sausages along with some onions and peppers.

place at bottom of smoker stack, on top of that put some dry rubbed pork ribs, brined chicken and some beef brisket.

Let the whole thing smoke for 10 hours.

I haven't worked out the dynamics and how to actually implement such dish yet, but i've got ideas!


Good lord, when you do figure it out be sure to invite me over please.
Having Paella with one of my small wine groups tomorrow night. Have no idea what kind (though it will likely lean more toward seafood) as someone else is cooking. I do know they are doing it outside over a fire. I'm bringing a couple of whites (Riesling and Pouilly Fuisse) and 4 Spanish reds. Reds might not be the best match with the Paella, but there will be other whites there and can drink the reds before and after. Looking forward to it.
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
Having Paella with one of my small wine groups tomorrow night. Have no idea what kind (though it will likely lean more toward seafood) as someone else is cooking. I do know they are doing it outside over a fire. I'm bringing a couple of whites (Riesling and Pouilly Fuisse) and 4 Spanish reds. Reds might not be the best match with the Paella, but there will be other whites there and can drink the reds before and after. Looking forward to it.


Cool

Hello all,
Mods, if this is in the wrong place, please move it. Thank you.

I guess no one started the threatened Paella Pan thread mentioned in the Carbon Skillet thread. So here goes Professional Paella Pan Flat Bottom Pata Negra!

So, paella pans, recommendations? I'm looking for a carbon steel pan. Or a black steel (same thing?). I've found some that are "restaurant" quality, meaning they are made from a thicker metal. Should I aim for one of those? Not sure I really want/need one from Mineral B, Matfer Bourgeat, Mauviel, etc. Magefesa® seems to be a name in paella pans, and Garcima is another name I see when looking. Thoughts? Suggestions?

Recipes. Well, I'd bypassed paella till now, cause I've always found recipes that are seafood. I don't like seafood/fish. Recently, in the carbon skillet thread (all 35 pages!) I saw that there were other kinds of recipes for paella that did not include seafood, and the snails were usually mentioned as optional, which, yes, I'd leave them out. So, I good source for non-seafood paella recipes? I'd look at the BBC, but they've been messing up ethinic recipes lately, so they've lost street cred in my mind.

Last edited by Ahsan

What makes an authentic paella?

Does a paella have to be cooked in a special pan? (There is one, but I can't remember the name of it at the moment.)

How varied are paellas compared to risotto?

What kind of image is conjured up for you when you think about or hear about paella?

For me, there is paella Valenciana (the traditional kind incorporating chicken, pork, shellfish, and vegetables) and vegetarian paella. I have made recipes that were a blurring of lines between paella and risotto. What are your favorite kinds and recipes? like Chicken paella

Last edited by Ahsan

The pan used to cook paella is called a paella.

A risotto is stirred to get the starch out of the rice and thicken it. This is what gives "creaminess" in a risotto (and you should never, ever add actual cream to a risotto).

In a paella, once the rice is added, you do not stir it. Never, ever stir the rice. Never. You want the rice to be in a thin layer on the pan, and control the heat to get a good soccarat - but one that isn't burnt.

For best results, use a good quality Bomba rice.

Never use onion in your paella - you are trying to evaporate liquid in a paella, and onions just add moisture.

Here's a good reference for a traditional paella Valenciana, pictures and all (in Spanish, but you can use Google Translate to get the gist):

Paella Valenciana

Paella that I've eaten in Valencia have also had snails (when in season and in the shell), and duck, and they are delicious. For the chicken, use bone-in, skin-on thighs.

Instead of toasting the saffron, I prefer to soak it in some of the chicken stock I'm going to use in the cooking process. I don't use the "colorant" they talk about as I don't want that chemical in my food and there's more than enough colour from good quality saffron.

If you can't find garrafon, then use lima beans. In both cases, the dried beans need to be soaked overnight, and then you need to peel the paper-like skin off them.

I remove the meat before adding the rice, as I want it to sink to the bottom, and then gently place the meat back in the pan in a good arrangement.

Finally, don't overload the paella (pan, in this case). Paella is about the rice, and everything else is an accompaniment. Otherwise it's a meat dish with a little bit of rice - which isn't a paella.

Finally, always serve your paella using a wooden spoon, ideally one that has a flat edge on the bottom so you can scrape up a bit of soccarat with every scoop. And don't be a dick and steal all the soccarat from your dining companions.

If you follow those tips and adapt the recipe in the link provided using your cooking instincts, you'll be fine after cooking it a few times.

@futronic posted:

Not sure why you'd use gin with the botanicals in it? I don't want that flavour in my paella. Just use the stock that you're already putting in the dish.

depends on the protein.  I use gin for boars.  this would be before i add the rice.

for the rice and saffron, I use stoli.  you'll find the color and flavor extraction of the alcohol being super efficient.

@futronic posted:

The pan used to cook paella is called a paella.

A risotto is stirred to get the starch out of the rice and thicken it. This is what gives "creaminess" in a risotto (and you should never, ever add actual cream to a risotto).

In a paella, once the rice is added, you do not stir it. Never, ever stir the rice. Never. You want the rice to be in a thin layer on the pan, and control the heat to get a good soccarat - but one that isn't burnt.

For best results, use a good quality Bomba rice.

Never use onion in your paella - you are trying to evaporate liquid in a paella, and onions just add moisture.

Here's a good reference for a traditional paella Valenciana, pictures and all (in Spanish, but you can use Google Translate to get the gist):

Paella Valenciana

Paella that I've eaten in Valencia have also had snails (when in season and in the shell), and duck, and they are delicious. For the chicken, use bone-in, skin-on thighs.

Instead of toasting the saffron, I prefer to soak it in some of the chicken stock I'm going to use in the cooking process. I don't use the "colorant" they talk about as I don't want that chemical in my food and there's more than enough colour from good quality saffron.

If you can't find garrafon, then use lima beans. In both cases, the dried beans need to be soaked overnight, and then you need to peel the paper-like skin off them.

I remove the meat before adding the rice, as I want it to sink to the bottom, and then gently place the meat back in the pan in a good arrangement.

Finally, don't overload the paella (pan, in this case). Paella is about the rice, and everything else is an accompaniment. Otherwise it's a meat dish with a little bit of rice - which isn't a paella.

Finally, always serve your paella using a wooden spoon, ideally one that has a flat edge on the bottom so you can scrape up a bit of soccarat with every scoop. And don't be a dick and steal all the soccarat from your dining companions.

If you follow those tips and adapt the recipe in the link provided using your cooking instincts, you'll be fine after cooking it a few times.

Thanks for sharing this!

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×