quote:
Originally posted by Eb56:
I'm a World Atlas guy, myself.


Eric . . . if you could only have 1 wine book, would you still prefer World Atlas over Oxford Companion? Overall I consider the content to be relatively similar but styles and use of maps/graphics are quite different. What's driving your preference?

My preference for Oxford Companion is admittedly largely due to familiarity. It was the first wine book I ever bought and that legacy plays a large role in my preference.
quote:
Originally posted by Merengue:
I'd say it depends on the level of knowledge you have. The Oxford Wine Companion is like an encyclopedia, really complete, but for a beginner (not saying you are one), I think the Wine Bible is a great start.


That's quite a good rec. The Wine Bible certainly makes for an easier read than the Companion. The Companion is dense and incredibly thorough which might be daunting if that's not what you're looking for
The Oxford Wine Companion and The World Atlas of Wine are both encyclopaedic and contain good info, but are not well set for use as a single reference imo. I've seen groups of Wine Guild Education students comparing strategies on how to reorganize the content of these two books into usable formats. They use these books as their standard reference material but have difficulty using it as presented. I have them but rarely consult them.

For easy reference and one book, I prefer Sotheby's Wine Encyclopedia. Not everyone agrees with Tom Stevenson's reviews of individual wineries, but it's well organized and easy to use as a reference. You can also read through sections on various regions and get an indication of the region.

Each book has its appeal and drawbacks. A good strategy may be to go to a book store and check out the short list from the recommendations here and see which you prefer. They all have good information in them.
I was just about to start this same thread. However, I need something that is available in an ebook, and it looks like all of the recommendations above are only available in hardcopy.

I was trying to decide between "Wine for Dummies" Kindle Edition and "Uncorked: The Novice's Guide to Wine" Kindle Edition. Any recommendations for an ebook on wine?
While it is obviously specific only to one country, the best wine book, imo, is Vino Italiano by Joseph Bastianich and David Lynch. (Recipies by Lidia Bastianich and Mario Batali.) I cannot think of another wine-related book that achieves its goals so well or completely. It is also THE reference point for Italian wine for virtually every serious Italian wine lover I know.
quote:
Originally posted by Chard:
Has anyone perused through "Wine Grapes"?


Yes, I have a copy. Serious geek territory here. Valuable resource for some of us, and quite informative for those who want to geek out about that sort of thing, but certainly not an introductory "one book".
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
While it is obviously specific only to one country, the best wine book, imo, is Vino Italiano by Joseph Bastianich and David Lynch. (Recipies by Lidia Bastianich and Mario Batali.) I cannot think of another wine-related book that achieves its goals so well or completely. It is also THE reference point for Italian wine for virtually every serious Italian wine lover I know.


Thanks for your post. Just ordered one.
quote:
Originally posted by Merengue:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
While it is obviously specific only to one country, the best wine book, imo, is Vino Italiano by Joseph Bastianich and David Lynch. (Recipies by Lidia Bastianich and Mario Batali.) I cannot think of another wine-related book that achieves its goals so well or completely. It is also THE reference point for Italian wine for virtually every serious Italian wine lover I know.


Thanks for your post. Just ordered one.

Great! I think you'll like it!
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by Merengue:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
While it is obviously specific only to one country, the best wine book, imo, is Vino Italiano by Joseph Bastianich and David Lynch. (Recipies by Lidia Bastianich and Mario Batali.) I cannot think of another wine-related book that achieves its goals so well or completely. It is also THE reference point for Italian wine for virtually every serious Italian wine lover I know.


Thanks for your post. Just ordered one.

Great! I think you'll like it!


I'll be travelling to Rome (short bs trip) towards the end of the month so i am looking forward to reading it on the plane and hunting for some bottles during my short stay.
quote:
Originally posted by yhn:
quote:
Originally posted by Chard:
Has anyone perused through "Wine Grapes"?


Yes, I have a copy. Serious geek territory here. Valuable resource for some of us, and quite informative for those who want to geek out about that sort of thing, but certainly not an introductory "one book".


Thanks, I might pull the trigger on this book...
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by Merengue:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
While it is obviously specific only to one country, the best wine book, imo, is Vino Italiano by Joseph Bastianich and David Lynch. (Recipies by Lidia Bastianich and Mario Batali.) I cannot think of another wine-related book that achieves its goals so well or completely. It is also THE reference point for Italian wine for virtually every serious Italian wine lover I know.


Thanks for your post. Just ordered one.

Great! I think you'll like it!


Thanks Wintarelli. I always assumed thus book was all about them for some reason. I may give it a shot.

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