Skip to main content

@otw posted:

I'm curious how you liked drinking the Carla 6?

I've known Gianpaolo Motta (the winemaker) for many years and visit him regularly.  I've struggled to like Carla, it's just too big a wine for me.  The richness and concentration of the fruit exceed any other Sangiovese wine that I have drunk, although I think the later vintages have become a bit more nuanced and expressive.

Its fading from memory a bit as it was last week, and I'm pretty poor with specific descriptors, but general speaking it didn't come across as a big wine or over extracted and was pleasant enough.  It didn't seem particularly young, either, but rather a wine right around its best by date.

@jabe11 posted:

Its fading from memory a bit as it was last week, and I'm pretty poor with specific descriptors, but general speaking it didn't come across as a big wine or over extracted and was pleasant enough.  It didn't seem particularly young, either, but rather a wine right around its best by date.

Good to hear that you enjoyed it.  I found that the more recent vintages, starting with 2014/2015, were more nuanced and I was able to parse the fruit flavours much better. 

Out of the ones you listed I'd put Cayuse at the top myself.  That's my palate.

In general my world begins and ends with Syrah and Grenache from the Rhone but once I do cross the pond Cayuse is top of the heap for me.  But I do get a lot of sanctification out of the wines out of Paso Robles as well.  Been digging those a lot lately.

Still a big SQN fan.  SQN is the largest holding in my cellar.  Double my second largest holding: Thomas Pinot Noir.  Literally double.

On our bi-weekly Zoom wine call:

2016 Cape Point Vineyards Isliedh

2015 Bedrock Wine Co Cuvée Karatas

2017 Koncho & Co Rkatsiteli Qvevri

2001 Cavalotto Barolo Bricco Boschis

2012 Giacomo Conterno Barbera d’Alba Francia

2010 Le Cadeau Pinot Noir Diversite

2012 Eric Texier Côtes du Rhône Saint-Julien-en-Saint-Alban Vieille Serine Domaine de Pergaud

2003 Kanonkop Paul Sauer

The Cavallotto was what you’d expect from a top producer with a top vineyard in a top vintage. The fruit was very fresh and there was just a hint of balsamic. There was a bit of bricking that indicated the wine had age, but you wouldn’t have known it from the palate.

Surprisingly, no one identified it as Barolo (although I can’t recall right now what people guessed). I picked up on the slight balsamic note and my mind went to Piedmont, but for some reason I said I thought it was an early 2000s Barbera from a top producer - probably because I was thinking about my contribution (which was the next wine in our lineup), the G. Conterno Barbera Francia.

@sunnylea57 posted:

The Cavallotto was what you’d expect from a top producer with a top vineyard in a top vintage. The fruit was very fresh and there was just a hint of balsamic. There was a bit of bricking that indicated the wine had age, but you wouldn’t have known it from the palate.

Surprisingly, no one identified it as Barolo (although I can’t recall right now what people guessed). I picked up on the slight balsamic note and my mind went to Piedmont, but for some reason I said I thought it was an early 2000s Barbera from a top producer - probably because I was thinking about my contribution (which was the next wine in our lineup), the G. Conterno Barbera Francia.

Thank you sunnylea for the Cavallotto description. I loved it, and guessed '97 Brunello.

The Le Cadeau, my contribution to the evening, was somewhat underwhelming and one dimensional. While the group was nearly unanimous in identifying it as pinot, it clearly had neither the nuance of Burgundy nor the purity and power of California. Underneath the fruity exterior, there was little depth aside from beetroot and cola notes.  One hopes for better after cellaring a $60 bottle for 7 years.

Mimik and Steve, if you are holding these, I would love to hear your thoughts if/when you open one. 

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×