Given today's H-Bomb test in North Korea what should the US do in response? I personally think it's time for complete financial withdrawal of access for any nation's bank or company operating here while also conducting business in NK. What else can be done?
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
Given today's H-Bomb test in North Korea what should the US do in response? I personally think it's time for complete financial withdrawal of access for any nation's bank or company operating here while also conducting business in NK. What else can be done?


Hire Dr. Stranglove
I have been saying for years, we need to abandon our 'one Korea' policy in favor of a strong policy that nonetheless allows China a Korean Peninsula buffer -- just not one headed by madmen. Even now, if China has no reason to help this douche, the problem would likely work its way out.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
Either by cyberattacks or military force- destroy every missile they launch before it clears the launch site. Isolate that idiot financially and destroy any ship leaving with armaments. We cannot allow him to have the ability to start WWIII



missles/drones/warheads take time to travel across the pacific.

NK has satellites and surveillance too.

if they see a big armada/missles coming at them, they could potentially wipe out south korea and japan before the US can do anything.
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
We need to force China to step up and deal with this idiot who is threatening WWIII. Japan and S. Korea have much more to lose than we do.


you are sorely mistaken

japan and s korea make up one of the largest high end electronics manufacturers and designers in the world.

You'll set back eletronics and computer supplies on high tech equipment for years.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
Either by cyberattacks or military force- destroy every missile they launch before it clears the launch site. Isolate that idiot financially and destroy any ship leaving with armaments. We cannot allow him to have the ability to start WWIII



missles/drones/warheads take time to travel across the pacific.

NK has satellites and surveillance too.

if they see a big armada/missles coming at them, they could potentially wipe out south korea and japan before the US can do anything.


g, we would have nothing coming from across anything. We have two nuclear subs sitting off the coast waiting as we speak, bases in South Korea and three bases in Guam on high alert.

As more data including air matter is collected the next couple of days from NK's test the U.S. will have a better idea what they are dealing with.
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Surreptitious undercover targeted assassinations and poisonings and clandestine trauma to their nuclear industry. No clue if this is possible.


My thoughts exactly. It needs to start with some type of decapitation strike from on the ground. I continue to hold out hope that one of their generals is waiting the right chance.

A pre-emptive frontal assault will most likely lead to total destruction of Seoul including our 20K+ soldiers and families stationed there.
quote:
Originally posted by Maverick:
It takes much more time for anything we send to NK than it does for NK to wipe out Seoul. It's something like 38-miles from the NK missile implants to Seoul. I think that's like 15-18 seconds for regular missiles.


Which is exactly why SK and U.S. have THAAD ready to launch instantly. Four have already been deployed.
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Surreptitious undercover targeted assassinations and poisonings and clandestine trauma to their nuclear industry. No clue if this is possible.

The most closed off society in the world? Rampant surveillance and little in the way of crowds and activity on a daily basis to mask covert activities? Easy peasy........not.

The only chance of anything like the above happening is with China's cooperation. Consider those chances slim to none, and slim has left the building.
This is all well and good. I'm sure it's a really nice program. For Me however ... I would not at all be willing to risk that many lives on technology.
quote:
Which is exactly why SK and U.S. have THAAD ready to launch instantly. Four have already been deployed.
quote:
Originally posted by Maverick:
This is all well and good. I'm sure it's a really nice program. For Me however ... I would not at all be willing to risk that many lives on technology.
quote:
Which is exactly why SK and U.S. have THAAD ready to launch instantly. Four have already been deployed.


I'm not sure what you think you read. I'm in no way suggesting risking any life. That said, all life defense systems in our current environment are and will be based on technology, regardless. We have seen just this unfortunately with Israel and their need to protect their homeland using the Arrow system much like our THAAD system.

I, like everyone I know hope none of this will be needed, but hope is not a strategic plan.
While catching up on the news this afternoon I read something by our fearless leader that for the first time I find myself in agreement with, or at least not disagreeing.

Any economists or those that may have recently stayed at a Holiday Inn wish to weigh in on the actual consequences of such an action.

POTUS: "The United States is considering, in addition to other options, stopping all trade with any country doing business with North Korea."

The quote is obviously aimed at China. I'm sure the impact would be huge and most likely immediately felt, but I'm personally willing to deal with fewer choices and higher prices in the short term if it helps avoid what appears to be an inevitable war on the Korean peninsula. Russia and China can't be happy with the thought of a larger US presence semi-permanently on their eastern borders once we get done wiping out that regime.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
While catching up on the news this afternoon I read something by our fearless leader that for the first time I find myself in agreement with, or at least not disagreeing.

Any economists or those that may have recently stayed at a Holiday Inn wish to weigh in on the actual consequences of such an action.

POTUS: "The United States is considering, in addition to other options, stopping all trade with any country doing business with North Korea."

The quote is obviously aimed at China. I'm sure the impact would be huge and most likely immediately felt, but I'm personally willing to deal with fewer choices and higher prices in the short term if it helps avoid what appears to be an inevitable war on the Korean peninsula. Russia and China can't be happy with the thought of a larger US presence semi-permanently on their eastern borders once we get done wiping out that regime.


snipes, I hope you are well.

While it may sound good, it would be an economic disaster for the U.S. if that truly happened. While the focus is on China, you would have to add Germany, Mexico and Brazil just to name a few. You are talking a trillion dollars and all but killing companies like Apple, Boeing and American auto companies. I just don't see that happening.

If you do see this happening, please text me so I can go ALL cash. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art: << what was said >>

Oh I get what was said. I think the defense systems are all cool good and wonderful. I just can't see and don't believe in taking a risk that big depending on technology. THAAD is what ... 20-years old? It's been at best ... 40% effective. Me personally ... I'd love to see us just wipe the clown and his everything right off the map. I'd give the stupid little plot of land to China. I'm sure there would be lots of flack with that idea too.
China's our biggest creditor to begin with. Couple that with a not insignificant amount of real estate in major metros like NYC, SF Bay Area and LA benefiting from Chinese buyers, and we're talking about a recipe for a financial shock that would reverberate for a few years.
Picking up on Mavericks comment about this tiny stupid plot of land in his post.

North Korea is truly a small and even tiny player without nuclear power which I guess is one of their major motives. With 25M in population and a shockingly low GDP of only $25-$30B ( nominal) which is only the size of Vermont, the smallest in America.

It is hard to imagine that 60 years ago NK was the more economic power, equal in population and considered more progressive. Now SK has a nominal GDP of $1.4T and an economy servicing the world.
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
China's our biggest creditor to begin with. Couple that with a not insignificant amount of real estate in major metros like NYC, SF Bay Area and LA benefiting from Chinese buyers, and we're talking about a recipe for a financial shock that would reverberate for a few years.


+1
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
China's our biggest creditor to begin with. Couple that with a not insignificant amount of real estate in major metros like NYC, SF Bay Area and LA benefiting from Chinese buyers, and we're talking about a recipe for a financial shock that would reverberate for a few years.


That's factually incorrect

The US tax payer is the largest creditor to the US Government. By almost a factor of 10. Treasury yields have been at such a historical low, countries are simply giving the US more near interest free money to maintain their dollar ratio. (This is also why you have such shitty pension/social security returns in recent times.) If china were to sell their entire portfolio of US debt, you'd see yields raise by a paltry amount. As long as the US Dollar is still the world's defacto currency, this will always be the case.

the Coast line real estate, while large, is also not a significant shock. It has very little actual causative factor that lead to a nationwide real estate devaluation seen in 2007.

The most prominent knock on effect is the inability of other trading partners to even match the manufacturing prowess that China and it's foreign holdings represents. It takes alot of money and time to build up the manufacturing capability state side and to W+A 's point, I'd seriously doubt anyone has the time nor resources to stomach such a huge negative return to do that kind of capital investment when they can't sell their products to what is one of the largest consumer markets in the world.
The reach is chinese manufacturing is wide and extension. Take smithfield, one of the US' largest supplier/distributor of pork products. There goes bbq'ing. Same goes for the vegans without a steady source of Soy and Soy equivalent products. That vegan diet is now going to be almost 5x more expensive.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
China's our biggest creditor to begin with. Couple that with a not insignificant amount of real estate in major metros like NYC, SF Bay Area and LA benefiting from Chinese buyers, and we're talking about a recipe for a financial shock that would reverberate for a few years.


That's factually incorrect

The US tax payer is the largest creditor to the US Government. By almost a factor of 10. Treasury yields have been at such a historical low, countries are simply giving the US more near interest free money to maintain their dollar ratio. (This is also why you have such shitty pension/social security returns in recent times.) If china were to sell their entire portfolio of US debt, you'd see yields raise by a paltry amount. As long as the US Dollar is still the world's defacto currency, this will always be the case.

the Coast line real estate, while large, is also not a significant shock. It has very little actual causative factor that lead to a nationwide real estate devaluation seen in 2007.

The most prominent knock on effect is the inability of other trading partners to even match the manufacturing prowess that China and it's foreign holdings represents. It takes alot of money and time to build up the manufacturing capability state side and to W+A 's point, I'd seriously doubt anyone has the time nor resources to stomach such a huge negative return to do that kind of capital investment when they can't sell their products to what is one of the largest consumer markets in the world.
The reach is chinese manufacturing is wide and extension. Take smithfield, one of the US' largest supplier/distributor of pork products. There goes bbq'ing. Same goes for the vegans without a steady source of Soy and Soy equivalent products. That vegan diet is now going to be almost 5x more expensive.

It's not the actual loss of Chinese buying power that would roil the markets. It's the perception of the effect of losing a significant buyer that would create the shockwaves.

As for Smithfield, of course our Dunce in Chief wouldn't equate them as being Chinese. Whoever heard of a Chinese guy named Smithfield??!!??

And who cares about vegetarians and vegans? That's some silly "librul" agenda mumbo jumbo.

As for manufacturing capability, little of that would shift stateside. It'd instead go to Vietnam, Bangladesh, Mexico and other lower cost (than the US) areas of the world. Taiwan and South Korea would also see a bump as manufacturing that had left their shores for China returned (likely the more specialty and higher end types of manufacturing).

But all of this is just a lot of hot air, as 45 isn't going to get anyone to go along with this. This isn't something he can Executive Order to implement.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
... we would have nothing coming from across anything. We have two nuclear subs sitting off the coast waiting as we speak, bases in South Korea and three bases in Guam on high alert.

As more data including air matter is collected the next couple of days from NK's test the U.S. will have a better idea what they are dealing with.

+1

To quote George Friedman (a level-headed geopolitical specialist), "time is on our side." At this point it's all about strategic positioning of forces and assets. Let's hope patience and pressure avert the worst possible scenarios, but it doesn't look encouraging, no matter what comes next.
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
China's our biggest creditor to begin with. Couple that with a not insignificant amount of real estate in major metros like NYC, SF Bay Area and LA benefiting from Chinese buyers, and we're talking about a recipe for a financial shock that would reverberate for a few years.


That's factually incorrect

The US tax payer is the largest creditor to the US Government. By almost a factor of 10. Treasury yields have been at such a historical low, countries are simply giving the US more near interest free money to maintain their dollar ratio. (This is also why you have such shitty pension/social security returns in recent times.) If china were to sell their entire portfolio of US debt, you'd see yields raise by a paltry amount. As long as the US Dollar is still the world's defacto currency, this will always be the case.

the Coast line real estate, while large, is also not a significant shock. It has very little actual causative factor that lead to a nationwide real estate devaluation seen in 2007.

The most prominent knock on effect is the inability of other trading partners to even match the manufacturing prowess that China and it's foreign holdings represents. It takes alot of money and time to build up the manufacturing capability state side and to W+A 's point, I'd seriously doubt anyone has the time nor resources to stomach such a huge negative return to do that kind of capital investment when they can't sell their products to what is one of the largest consumer markets in the world.
The reach is chinese manufacturing is wide and extension. Take smithfield, one of the US' largest supplier/distributor of pork products. There goes bbq'ing. Same goes for the vegans without a steady source of Soy and Soy equivalent products. That vegan diet is now going to be almost 5x more expensive.

It's not the actual loss of Chinese buying power that would roil the markets. It's the perception of the effect of losing a significant buyer that would create the shockwaves.

As for Smithfield, of course our Dunce in Chief wouldn't equate them as being Chinese. Whoever heard of a Chinese guy named Smithfield??!!??

And who cares about vegetarians and vegans? That's some silly "librul" agenda mumbo jumbo.

As for manufacturing capability, little of that would shift stateside. It'd instead go to Vietnam, Bangladesh, Mexico and other lower cost (than the US) areas of the world. Taiwan and South Korea would also see a bump as manufacturing that had left their shores for China returned (likely the more specialty and higher end types of manufacturing).

But all of this is just a lot of hot air, as 45 isn't going to get anyone to go along with this. This isn't something he can Executive Order to implement.

No one gives a shit about the perception of Chinese buying real estate in the us except those who wish to make a racist remark about how foreigners are owning this country or those looking in the small microcosm of buying similar properties that attractive a certain type of buyer. This represents less than .8% of the real estate market. It's be like someone trying to make a statement about the us market based on colombians or Brazilians buying miami real estate. No one except that localized economy gives a shit


The very first bomb that nk sets off is in South Korea. The second one is Japan. You'd have zero high tech manufacturing capability left in the region. And they represent almost 70% of high tech manufacturing for the world.
High margin, strict IP manufacturing is not going to be shifted anytime soon.

China tho still has mid tier manufacturing along with high tech manufacturing capacity. You are sorely mistaken if you think Vietnam or any country not named China is going to pick up this capacity.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
China's our biggest creditor to begin with. Couple that with a not insignificant amount of real estate in major metros like NYC, SF Bay Area and LA benefiting from Chinese buyers, and we're talking about a recipe for a financial shock that would reverberate for a few years.


That's factually incorrect

The US tax payer is the largest creditor to the US Government. By almost a factor of 10. Treasury yields have been at such a historical low, countries are simply giving the US more near interest free money to maintain their dollar ratio. (This is also why you have such shitty pension/social security returns in recent times.) If china were to sell their entire portfolio of US debt, you'd see yields raise by a paltry amount. As long as the US Dollar is still the world's defacto currency, this will always be the case.

the Coast line real estate, while large, is also not a significant shock. It has very little actual causative factor that lead to a nationwide real estate devaluation seen in 2007.

The most prominent knock on effect is the inability of other trading partners to even match the manufacturing prowess that China and it's foreign holdings represents. It takes alot of money and time to build up the manufacturing capability state side and to W+A 's point, I'd seriously doubt anyone has the time nor resources to stomach such a huge negative return to do that kind of capital investment when they can't sell their products to what is one of the largest consumer markets in the world.
The reach is chinese manufacturing is wide and extension. Take smithfield, one of the US' largest supplier/distributor of pork products. There goes bbq'ing. Same goes for the vegans without a steady source of Soy and Soy equivalent products. That vegan diet is now going to be almost 5x more expensive.

It's not the actual loss of Chinese buying power that would roil the markets. It's the perception of the effect of losing a significant buyer that would create the shockwaves.

As for Smithfield, of course our Dunce in Chief wouldn't equate them as being Chinese. Whoever heard of a Chinese guy named Smithfield??!!??

And who cares about vegetarians and vegans? That's some silly "librul" agenda mumbo jumbo.

As for manufacturing capability, little of that would shift stateside. It'd instead go to Vietnam, Bangladesh, Mexico and other lower cost (than the US) areas of the world. Taiwan and South Korea would also see a bump as manufacturing that had left their shores for China returned (likely the more specialty and higher end types of manufacturing).

But all of this is just a lot of hot air, as 45 isn't going to get anyone to go along with this. This isn't something he can Executive Order to implement.

No one gives a shit about the perception of Chinese buying real estate in the us except those who wish to make a racist remark about how foreigners are owning this country or those looking in the small microcosm of buying similar properties that attractive a certain type of buyer. This represents less than .8% of the real estate market. It's be like someone trying to make a statement about the us market based on colombians or Brazilians buying miami real estate. No one except that localized economy gives a shit


The very first bomb that nk sets off is in South Korea. The second one is Japan. You'd have zero high tech manufacturing capability left in the region. And they represent almost 70% of high tech manufacturing for the world.
High margin, strict IP manufacturing is not going to be shifted anytime soon.

China tho still has mid tier manufacturing along with high tech manufacturing capacity. You are sorely mistaken if you think Vietnam or any country not named China is going to pick up this capacity.

Dude, what is this "zero high tech manufacturing capability left in the region if SK and Japan get bombed" garbage that you're talking about? Financially and strategically, the Samsungs and Hitachis of the world would be idiots to put all their eggs into their very high cost and high target domestic markets. And lo and behold, they don't:

Samsung makes very little of its products domestically, JG

Ever heard of Foxconn? You know, that Taiwanese behemoth that is the largest contract manufacturer in the world? Their manufacturing locations aren't in SK and Japan.

Trust me from being in the infrastructure technology world for going on 2 decades. Manufacturing is always done in much lower cost areas than where tech companies are HQ'ed and have their R&D facilities. Getting ISO certification isn't a challenge in 3rd world countries if you have the knowledge and funding.
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
China's our biggest creditor to begin with. Couple that with a not insignificant amount of real estate in major metros like NYC, SF Bay Area and LA benefiting from Chinese buyers, and we're talking about a recipe for a financial shock that would reverberate for a few years.


That's factually incorrect

The US tax payer is the largest creditor to the US Government. By almost a factor of 10. Treasury yields have been at such a historical low, countries are simply giving the US more near interest free money to maintain their dollar ratio. (This is also why you have such shitty pension/social security returns in recent times.) If china were to sell their entire portfolio of US debt, you'd see yields raise by a paltry amount. As long as the US Dollar is still the world's defacto currency, this will always be the case.

the Coast line real estate, while large, is also not a significant shock. It has very little actual causative factor that lead to a nationwide real estate devaluation seen in 2007.

The most prominent knock on effect is the inability of other trading partners to even match the manufacturing prowess that China and it's foreign holdings represents. It takes alot of money and time to build up the manufacturing capability state side and to W+A 's point, I'd seriously doubt anyone has the time nor resources to stomach such a huge negative return to do that kind of capital investment when they can't sell their products to what is one of the largest consumer markets in the world.
The reach is chinese manufacturing is wide and extension. Take smithfield, one of the US' largest supplier/distributor of pork products. There goes bbq'ing. Same goes for the vegans without a steady source of Soy and Soy equivalent products. That vegan diet is now going to be almost 5x more expensive.

It's not the actual loss of Chinese buying power that would roil the markets. It's the perception of the effect of losing a significant buyer that would create the shockwaves.

As for Smithfield, of course our Dunce in Chief wouldn't equate them as being Chinese. Whoever heard of a Chinese guy named Smithfield??!!??

And who cares about vegetarians and vegans? That's some silly "librul" agenda mumbo jumbo.

As for manufacturing capability, little of that would shift stateside. It'd instead go to Vietnam, Bangladesh, Mexico and other lower cost (than the US) areas of the world. Taiwan and South Korea would also see a bump as manufacturing that had left their shores for China returned (likely the more specialty and higher end types of manufacturing).

But all of this is just a lot of hot air, as 45 isn't going to get anyone to go along with this. This isn't something he can Executive Order to implement.

No one gives a shit about the perception of Chinese buying real estate in the us except those who wish to make a racist remark about how foreigners are owning this country or those looking in the small microcosm of buying similar properties that attractive a certain type of buyer. This represents less than .8% of the real estate market. It's be like someone trying to make a statement about the us market based on colombians or Brazilians buying miami real estate. No one except that localized economy gives a shit


The very first bomb that nk sets off is in South Korea. The second one is Japan. You'd have zero high tech manufacturing capability left in the region. And they represent almost 70% of high tech manufacturing for the world.
High margin, strict IP manufacturing is not going to be shifted anytime soon.

China tho still has mid tier manufacturing along with high tech manufacturing capacity. You are sorely mistaken if you think Vietnam or any country not named China is going to pick up this capacity.

Dude, what is this "zero high tech manufacturing capability left in the region if SK and Japan get bombed" garbage that you're talking about? Financially and strategically, the Samsungs and Hitachis of the world would be idiots to put all their eggs into their very high cost and high target domestic markets. And lo and behold, they don't:

Samsung makes very little of its products domestically, JG

Ever heard of Foxconn? You know, that Taiwanese behemoth that is the largest contract manufacturer in the world? Their manufacturing locations aren't in SK and Japan.

Trust me from being in the infrastructure technology world for going on 2 decades. Manufacturing is always done in much lower cost areas than where tech companies are HQ'ed and have their R&D facilities. Getting ISO certification isn't a challenge in 3rd world countries if you have the knowledge and funding.



I recall foxconn has their main manufacturing capacity in China.

As noted in our first thread, I'm saying the knock on effect is folks thinking that they'll sanction china and stop tradign with them.

You've just eliminated a huge manufacturing capacity world wide if you dont want to trade with China. That leaves SK and Japan, to which if you threw a bomb over, those two places would disappear.

Regardless, you dont understand the difference between high end IP technology manufacturing vs manufacturing capacity. Commoditized technology is outsourced, highly specific parts required for workings of high end electronics will always be localized due to the higher margin, specialized knowledge involved.

You are also missing the point, gettign ISO cert is easy, but what company is going to invest in a 3rd world country to increase manufacturing capacity if we're not allowed to trade with China?

As with being in the infrastructure technology world. My extended family owns one of the largest electronic and circuitry parts distributors in taiwan.
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
Even if the manufacturing plants are still intact though, if you take out the corporate headquarters, nobody's going to be manufacturing anything with the corporate arm vaporized.


or no one to sell it back to.
Being right leaning my whole life, I have generally be for flexing the muscle of our military when necessary. I would probably get to the point of necessity before most. However, the wars of my lifetime have largely been fought without the possible consequences to us here in the US, nor our allies, and even family members of people who I consider great friends. The time to invade has likely passed. The loss of innocent lives in SK and Japan will far outweigh our inevitable "victory". Forget about the financial impacts.

Danyull shared this article with me a few months ago.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ma...lem-on-earth/528717/

We basically need to facilitate a coup by the people of NK via getting information into NK.

Assissnation was my second thought after a full blown invasion was out of the question, but we need to understand that KJU is god there. If we kill him, the people won't be behind it currently and whoever takes his spot will easily raise the anti American actions and rhetoric. Danyull pointed out killing the r&d team would actually be better.



At the end of the day we have to wait it out.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
Even if the manufacturing plants are still intact though, if you take out the corporate headquarters, nobody's going to be manufacturing anything with the corporate arm vaporized.


or no one to sell it back to.

Do you guys think that all data is stored at a single "mothership"? It's not.

Do you think that the corporate hierarchy is such that there's no one capable of continuing operations if the CEO/CFO/President/etc were to go "offline"? Maybe in a mom and pop operation, but huge entities are a bit more resilient. It won't be business as usual the following day, but they're not gonna be out of commission for months or years.

I sell solutions that are inherently the foundation of disaster recovery/business continuity schema. Any regional disaster is going to have an impact, but anything that is made on a production line and isn't ginormous in size like a container ship or really heavy machinery will have a contingency plan to resume operations elsewhere.
quote:
Originally posted by Eb56:

We basically need to facilitate a coup by the people of NK via getting information into NK.

Assissnation was my second thought after a full blown invasion was out of the question, but we need to understand that KJU is god there. If we kill him, the people won't be behind it currently and whoever takes his spot will easily raise the anti American actions and rhetoric.

Domestic insurrection will never happen, for exactly the reason Eb56 mentions in the second part. For 3 or 4 generations now, the NK people have been raised almost since birth to revere the Kim family (who really are actual living gods, don'tcha know) more than their own. In grade schools, kids are taught to spot and inform on anyone who looks like they might be enjoying a slightly better lifestyle than the next guy, or who doesn't seem to be loving the leader enough. An entire country made of informants! If your house is burning down, you are expected to save your (mandatory) portraits of the dear leaders before going back for your children. The entire country is brainwashed, and many of those who escape, later cannot mentally cope with the freedoms offered outside the border.
Anyone with an original thought has already been purged (along with their families), including several high-ranking members of the military.
So hoping that someone inside will step up and clean house is nothing but a pipe dream.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×