Hi all on the forum, I'm looking forward to learning from you experts about different wines.

My wife like sweet, like Riunite Lambrusco, but I like something a little dry, like Pinot Noir.

I posted this somewhere but can't seem to find it. Please excuse the second post. 057912
Original Post
Welcome to the forum.

All I can tell you is that wine has a life-long learning curve. It is fun, but you never stop learning.

My first recommendation is to get a basic book, such as "Wine for Dummies", which is a great way to get started. The other thing you need to do is to start tasting as many wines as possible. It helps to take some notes on the wines you taste. Note the name of the wine, the region/grape variety, producer and vintage (or at least take a photo of the label), and jot down what taste, what you liked or disliked. These notes will really help you learn. If you like certain wines, go ahead and drink them, but then seek out wine that might be just a little different.

For example, your wife likes a light sweet red with a little fizz, maybe try branching out to Prosseco, or maybe a repasso(dry Italian red from a similar region) or maybe even sweet German Riesling. I find my wife to be more "adventurous" when we actually visit wineries and she can meet the people who make the wines.

Read a lot. Taste a lot. Repeat.
Good luck with your adventures.
Thanks Redhawk and UncleBeer for your replies. I was truly surprised that only two people responded, but this will give me a start. I've heard of Riesling, and will pick one up the next chance I get. I will also try the Prosseco and repasso.

I went to a LQ store and asked the manager for a semi sweet white wine awhile back, and did not like what he recommended. Can't remember what it was now, but I'd know it if I saw it again. From days of old I liked Blue Nun and Mateus, but have not tasted them in years.
quote:
Originally posted by ejaggers:
Thanks Redhawk and UncleBeer for your replies. I was truly surprised that only two people responded, but this will give me a start. I've heard of Riesling, and will pick one up the next chance I get. I will also try the Prosseco and repasso.


ejaggers - I'm not trying to be a jerk, but that's why only 2 people responded. We all had to start somewhere, and this is no disrespect to you, but if you say you've heard of Riesling, that's like saying you've heard of a Ford, what other kinds of cars are there?

Sweet, dry, there are infinite variations of those. And then there are things that aren't really dry but seem to be because of other elements. Wine is fun and I really encourage you to explore as much as possible. As far as "experts" on any forum, no comment - you'll figure that out soon enough.

There are many slightly sweet wines from places like Italy, so I'd encourage you to explore those. Some are quite delicious, some just nice on a summer afternoon. Brachetto from the north, Moscato from pretty much anywhere, Lambrusco and many others work. And Italy has some searingly dry wines as well, so it's a good place to start.

Best of luck!
quote:
...but if you say you've heard of Riesling, that's like saying you've heard of a Ford, what other kinds of cars are there?


GregT,

I don't understand why "I've heard of Riesling", was an issue. After all, I have. So what was the proper protocol? There are many, many that I haven't heard of, that's why I'm here.

My first line clearly says, "I'm looking forward to learning from you experts about different wines". So if I've never heard of anything but Ford, wouldn't the right thing to do, would be to ask?
Uh oh.

Ejag - again, I'm not picking at you and in fact, I'm trying to be helpful. It's hard to be clearer than I was, but anyhow, my point was that it's such a rudimentary question, maybe people didn't think they had much interest.

That's not to be snide. But look at it this way, Riesling is one of the world's greatest grapes, red or white. It is grown far and wide and it can be, and is, made in a variety of styles, from bone dry to syrupy sweet and everything in between. And it can be wonderful in all of those styles. Moreover, you can buy a pretty good Riesling for $10, and a really good one for $20, although you can also spend hundreds for some of the most expensive TBAs.

However, the large world of wine lovers tends to be most concerned with dry red wines. Reds tend not to be sweet, although that's not any kin of an absolute rule.

Anyhow, welcome to the forum and also to the world of wine!
Welcom ejag.

Suggest you try and find some wine tastings to go to. Greg T makes a good point about the incredibly wide range of styles, character, and price with Rieslings. Pinot is also grown in a lot of places and there is a wide range of styles, character, and prices. With Pinot being the 'heartbreak grape' and difficult to grow (due to its thin skin), quality and character vary year to year.

If you go to some wine tastings, you should be able to be more specific about what you like and what you are looking for. It's also a fun way to discover what you like.

Reading is good to. I like Sotheby's Wine Encyclopedia as the best all in one book.

Cheers
Another thought or two:

Following on to what Vincentric said, if you find a nice restaurant with a prix fix menu with wine pairings, that can be a great way to learn a wide variety of wines.

Alternatively, for some quick recs based on your initial description:

for Wife: try whites from Alsace; German Reislings or Gewurztraminer (German cousins to the French Alsacians); new world (US or New Zealand) Sauvignon blanc; Loire Valley whites . . . many options here without having to go with a white that has residual sugar

For you: Not quite sure what you mean by a little dry and how you're relating this to Pinot. But, if you like lighter body wines like Pinot, then stick with that grape but I'd suggest experimenting with different styles. For example, buy a bottle of Oregon Pinot, Napa Pinot, and French red burgundy. That will give you a nice intro to the versatility of this grape

Good luck and enjoy the journey!

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