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Looking for info on making wine racks.
I'm not talking upright shelves made out of 2x4s. More like this:
http://www.rosehillwinecellars.com/3rsV2/products.php?c...anufacturer=premium7

I can DL the installation instructions to get the general idea of how they are made but I really need more specific dimensions. Dimensions for std bttls, Champ/Port, and splits.

Also, what wood would be best? I have access to all kinds except redwood. I have a cabinet saw, planer, and jointer etc so rough sawn lumber is no problem. I like the idea of a softer hardwood like domestic cherry or walnut, or maybe mahogany. I plan on using brads and SS screws, and titebond for construction.
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I've been a hobbiest woodworker for about 7 years. For the measurements, just take out the old tape and check a few bottles. As for the type of wood, it is mostly a matter of preference. Cherry, walnut, maple and mahogany are all good to work with, realatively stable and look good - each in its own way. Quartersawn white oak works well for a craftsman era look and it smells like oaky wine when you work with it.

If you will have any large panels I would recomend using cabinet grade ply-wood or mdf and veneers. Wood movement can ruin an otherwise great piece of cabinetry. You may also want to consider using joinery techniques that eliminate the need for mechanical fastners.
I built the racking for my built in cellar with 12 inch redwood boards. Next time I'll use cedar, primarily because it's cheaper and more readily available. As far as size, check any reliable rack supplier, they'll have standard sizes. The main problem is how many of each size. The height of frustration is the knuckle head that thinks his wine needs a twelve pound, inch thick bottle that won't fit any rack.

I would recommend a higher percentage of large bottle sizes as it appears everyone is getting large bottles.

Additionally, build as many bins as you can. They will except odd size bottles more easily.
quote:

I would recommend a higher percentage of large bottle sizes as it appears everyone is getting large bottles.

Additionally, build as many bins as you can. They will except odd size bottles more easily.


I know what you mean about bttle size. On one end you have a German Riesling and the other, some Cali. Chardonnay in the 12lb bttl.
I've saved an assortment of different sized 750ml bttls and they vary significantly. Then there are the splits that are 13" tall. sheesh.

Frustrating.
Did someone say kybo? Big Grin

I did build my own racks, they look extremely close to those you might see at the Wine Racks America website. Though I don't have a production-grade workshop, the end results were pretty good, if I say so myself.

The work started with a 3D representation of the wine cellar to work out the dimension kinks. With the exception of the diamond bins, the bulk of the racks are individual columns tied in groups of 3, 4, 6, and 9 wide. I built the curved corners using individual columns, w/15 deg. spacers between the rear posts to give the 90 deg. 'bend', both for inside and outside radius curves. I built a jig on a 1 x 10 piece of pine, using 2 x 4 blocks between the cleats. This spacing works out for nearly every 750 ml bottle size you can imagine; only some of the large Chardonnay bottles and that damned Ch. de la Gardine CdP wont fit.

Typically, the racks are 9.5"D x 84"H, and hold eighteen (18) bottles vertically. I made two different 'case' type racks, one has six (6) horizontal shelves, the other has nine (9). I also made one double-wide diamond bin rack - about 42"H, w/a tilted display shelf on top, and a three-sided tasting table w/diamond bins for 375 mls on two sides, and the front displays large format bottles. I completed the setup w/a nice 3-1/2" crown molding on the top; that was really tough making the mitre cuts but the finished product is really quite nice.

The racking is made from #1 white pine, is unfinished, and looks fantastic; there was just too much surface to stain. I wanted to do red oak, but at the time, the budget didn't allow. The racking I built will hold in excess of 1,200 btls. I'll post some pictures; let me know if you need any further info.

FWIW, it took me approximately 8 weekends to build all of the racks, and I spent about $1,300 total on materials (more with some of the shiny new tools! Big Grin). Great project - very rewarding! Look at some of the pics here.
Last edited by kybo
Man, you should be proud! That is one impressive DIY project.
Thanks for the tips. Great idea using a 2x4 for spacing on your jig. Thanks for the tip you used on the corners as I was wondering about that. I find curved corners much nicer than a 90 deg one.
I wouldn't want to have to stain that either. YOu'd need a damn paint booth and commercial spray equip. just to get it done.
My project will be on a much smaller scale which is wherein lies the challenge.

Thanks for all the input and inspiration. If I was at all hesitant, i'm not any more.

Cheers,
P.
WEc;
Just wanted to keep the vertical storage to either 12 or 18 bottles (1 or 1.5 cases). 12 high was too short (I'm 6'6"); 18 was just right. Also, I was trying to follow what was available commercially. There's about 9" clear from the top of the racking to the ceiling, as I raised the floor (built a 2 x 6 subfloor) so I could install a VB and insulation.
ozarks21;

....flaws.... Confused

Seriously - of course I do. I'm no Norm Abrahms, and I really wished I'd thought through some of the other construction issues; the jig I built for the vertical 'ladders' worked great, but I didn't really do a good enough job cutting the vertical pieces to the same length, and final assembly was a bit of a challenge.

As far as showing if off, the neighbors stand w/mouth agape and glasses outstretched, and I've 'inspired' a couple other winos to partake in similar projects. Plus, I've actually had folks call me on Sunday for a special wine for dinner!

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