Have 2 few bottles of 2006 Paul Hobbs Kick Ranch Syrah, have no experience with Cali Syrah that I can recall...should I lay this down for a while? I like young wine and mature wine but not really anthing in the middle. I know the opinion that many have of the value of CT notes, but those that have posted notes generally don't seem to suggest that further aging is required. Any recommendations? Since I only have two i would hate to waste 1 by popping too early, but would also hate to waste both by not popping them early enough.

http://www.cellartracker.com/wine.asp?iWine=549871
Original Post
I have not drank Napa syrah a lot. But i recently had central coast syrah from ojai, stolpman and sonoma parmelee hill, 2006, 2008 and 2007 respectively and these were tight and quite young. The ojai was entering its drinking window but i had the impression it would be better at 7 years.
quote:
Originally posted by RightBankFan:
I have not drank Napa syrah a lot. But i recently had central coast syrah from ojai, stolpman and sonoma parmelee hill, 2006, 2008 and 2007 respectively and these were tight and quite young. The ojai was entering its drinking window but i had the impression it would be better at 7 years.

Ojai Syrahs, much more than many of their contemporaries, are built to improve with age.

I don't have experience with the Hobbs Syrah, but would pop one of your two bottles soon, just to check in, as it could be drinking quite nicely right now.

Generally speaking, CA Syrah is not built to age --- there are many exceptions, for sure, but following the general rule is usually the smart thing to do.
quote:
Originally posted by Machine:
Thanks all. Well at the very least the CT users seem to find it pleasurable. Maybe this is not the best first foray into Cali syrah, but if i can find a good meal to match then maybe i will pop one soon.


Grilled Boneless Leg of Lamb
Roasted Rosemary Potatoes

You're welcome. Wink

PH
Here's what Wine Spectator said on release -- if you trust them. LOL

Wine Spectator 93
"Beautifully crafted, this strikes a great balance between richness, complexity, depth and elegance, with ripe, vivid blackberry, wild berry and huckleberry fruit that's fleshy and concentrated, with a long, persistent finish. There are also lots of spice, pepper and mineral notes. Drink now through 2013. 249 cases made."


Honestly, I tend to look at alcohol level and make predictions based on that. For me, > 14.4% usually means drink soon.
quote:
Originally posted by Machine:
Thanks all. Well at the very least the CT users seem to find it pleasurable. Maybe this is not the best first foray into Cali syrah, but if i can find a good meal to match then maybe i will pop one soon.

I love the spicy notes of the syrah with Steak Au poivre and courvoisier Cream sauce (a la Capital grille). And of course potatoes.
quote:
Originally posted by Bob H:

Honestly, I tend to look at alcohol level and make predictions based on that. For me, > 14.4% usually means drink soon.


When it comes to Syrah and Pinot, that's exactly what I do. Saving me a lot of grief these days. Also taught me to pay more attention to Alc % of wines I purchase.
I looooove CA syrah, also Washington syrahs (many of which are as good for much less). And the ones I have (sorry, cannnot recall all the names, they are sitting in my cellar in Ottawa - but one is Arrowood Saralee's, another is K Vintners) I like much better with 7 or more years
quote:
Originally posted by Bob H
Honestly, I tend to look at alcohol level and make predictions based on that. For me, > 14.4% usually means drink soon.


Can you please ellaborate? Why is a higher alcohol level affecting aging potential? I noticed DJ Hombre agreed and applies this to pinot as well. Would you extend this beyond cali pinot and syrahs to other regions as well?
quote:
Originally posted by RightBankFan:
quote:
Originally posted by Bob H
Honestly, I tend to look at alcohol level and make predictions based on that. For me, > 14.4% usually means drink soon.


Can you please ellaborate? Why is a higher alcohol level affecting aging potential? I noticed DJ Hombre agreed and applies this to pinot as well. Would you extend this beyond cali pinot and syrahs to other regions as well?


A bit simplistic, but I heard a saying that "alcohol and oak live forever." In other words, a hot or oaky wine will not come into balance with age. In fact, the opposite will likely occur (as fruit and tannins fade). There are always exceptions to any rule. A structured balanced wine could potentially improve even with a higher alcohol level (think Alban syrah in this case - ABV typically > 15% Eek ).

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