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@steve8 posted:

TOM, you did see that part about the The Searchers being "not bad" right? Sorry but I don't consider it a good performance when the actor plays himself for 115 minutes and then has to act as human being for the last 3 minutes.

 

"Not bad" is not good enough for this universally acclaimed picture. I do put it in the top three westerns of all time. In addition John Wayne could not be playing himself because he was not born in the 19th century and did not fight is the Civil War. His character is the character of a person who has seen the things he's seen and has the prejudices that he has obtained over his life. He is not the same character that's in The Man Who Shot Liberty Shot Liberty, nor the same as the aging Calvary Captain in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (he was 42 at the time) nor is he even Johnny Ringo from Stagecoach. He and Ford created these characters and Wayne acted them.

When I was a hippie I certainly denigrated John Wayne for his support of the Vietnam War. As a reader of Playboy at the time I recall his racist statements in the magazine. However he is perfectly used by John Ford in a good number of movies and as I said a few great movies and "The Searchers" is one of them.

Last edited by The Old Man
@The Old Man posted:

"Not bad" is not good enough for this universally acclaimed picture. I do put it in the top three westerns of all time. In addition John Wayne could not be playing himself because he was not born in the 19th century and did not fight is the Civil War. His character is the character of a person who has seen the things he's seen and has the prejudices that he has obtained over his life. He is not the same character that's in The Man Who Shot Liberty Shot Liberty, nor the same as the aging Calvary Captain in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (he was 42 at the time) nor is he even Johnny Ringo from Stagecoach. He and Ford created these characters and Wayne acted them.

When I was a hippie I certainly denigrated John Wayne for his support of the Vietnam War. As a reader of Playboy at the time I recall his racist statements in the magazine. However he is perfectly used by John Ford in a good number of movies and as I said a few great movies and "The Searchers" is one of them.

I’m with Steve on this. I think The Searchers is good not great, and is consistently overrated. On the other hand, The Grapes of Wrath is freaking brilliant. 

Uncut Gems -- 79 pts. Like a PT Anderson movie raised to the 10th power. The Shafdi brothers, like the Coen bothers, are a pair of filmmakers who make films of their own vision. Both of them have made movies which deal with some issues of modern Judaism. Here they create one of the most unlikable lead characters since Jake Lamotta. The well named Harold Ratner is of the stereotype of the Jew who will doing anything for money. The problem is Sandler's portrayal is so authentic. The film can't be faulted for it. It just feels right. I think its major fault is that in its over-the-topness they create a character who would crash and burn within a week. Flawed but worth a look.

Last edited by The Old Man
@The Old Man posted:

Uncut Gems -- 79 pts. Like a PT Anderson movie raised to the 10th power. The Shafdi brothers, like the Coen bothers, are a pair of filmmakers who make films of their own vision. Both of them have made movies which deal with some issues of modern Judaism. Here they create one of the most unlikable lead characters since Jake Lamotta. The well named Harold Ratner is of the stereotype of the Jew who will doing anything for money. The problem is Sandler's portrayal is so authentic. The film can't be faulted for it. It just feels right. I think its major fault is that in its over-the-topness they create a character who would crash and burn within a week. Flawed but worth a look.

I hated this movie 

@The Old Man posted:

I'd say it's an easy movie to hate.

Seemed like a pretentious film school stident was given a big budget

I know that they are established film makers but that was my reaction.  As an aside, we had dinner out after seeing in the theatre back when  we did such things and I recognized a couple sitting  next to us from the theatre and One of us asked the others what we thought of the movie and someone said hated it and we said thank god and everyone laugjed

 

@jcocktosten posted:

Seemed like a pretentious film school stident was given a big budget

I know that they are established film makers but that was my reaction.  As an aside, we had dinner out after seeing in the theatre back when  we did such things and I recognized a couple sitting  next to us from the theatre and One of us asked the others what we thought of the movie and someone said hated it and we said thank god and everyone laugjed

 

We must run in different crowds because my wife and I, along with a number of our friends, really enjoyed the movie.  Maybe as someone who used to bet on sporting events, it hit a little closer to home.  The anxiety throughout the movie until its conclusion was palpable.  

The Searchers -- 94 pts. I thought this would be a good time to revisit this movie and it's been sitting on my DVR for sometime. The American Film Institute lists it as the number one western of all time. On any given day for me it rotates with The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and Unforgiven. They also put it number 18 on their list of the all times best movies. This I disagree with.

Some new things I noticed. First looking at the cinematography by Winston C. Hoch. The blacks he creates for the interiors of some of the cabins is quite amazing. It is very difficult to pull off as recently explained in a documentary on Gordon Willis on his work in The Godfather. They also take courage from the director because you wind up with a negative that is essentially clear in the dark areas. If you have to make a color or lighting correction you don't have much to work with. And this brings me to the work of those unseen technicians behind the scenes; in this case Technicolor color consultant James Gooch. This was his last film and as he so often did showed himself the master of the Technicolor three strip process. I have never seen better looking day for night scenes and much the in the studio process work comes out looking very natural. In fact  near the end  watch how  they take the day for night of our heroes looking from the cliff down at the  Indian village and cut to a shot of that Village shot in the studio but with continuous look of day for night. Other fine examples of his work can be seen in Singing in the RainAn American in Paris, Show Boat and Annie Get Your Gun.

John Ford, like Alfred Hitchcock, began  his career making silents. Like Hitchcock he is as teller of the story in pictures, not words. You can see this in the way he tells us the story of the kidnapped girl. First in her abduction and then in the discovery of it by Wayne and others.

For those that knock John Wayne as an actor he shows his range by the expression of horror when he sees the burnt out cabin. Also in his rage when he discovers and tries to hide the murder (and presumed rape) of the older daughter. "What do you want me to do? Spell it out for you?" Another favorite line is when Jeffery Hunter says, "I hope you die." Wayne snaps back, "That will be the day."

A great cast of wonderful supporting actors, many of  them Ford regulars that makes for at least a dozen great scenes in many different settings. And to top it off, one of Max Steiner's better and not so over the top score. I find myself haunted by this movie each time I see it.

"Let's go home, Debbie."

 

Last edited by The Old Man
@The Old Man posted:

The Searchers -- 94 pts. I thought this would be a good time to revisit this movie and it's been sitting on my DVR for sometime. The American Film Institute lists it as the number one western of all time. On any given day for me it rotates with The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and Unforgiven. They also put it number 18 on their list of the all times best movies. This I disagree with.

Some new things I noticed. First looking at the cinematography by Winston C. Hoch. The blacks he creates for the interiors of some of the cabins is quite amazing. It is very difficult to pull off as recently explained in a documentary on Gordon Willis on his work in The Godfather. They also take courage from the director because you wind up with a negative that is essentially clear in the dark areas. If you have to make a color or lighting correction you don't have much to work with. And this brings me to the work of those unseen technicians behind the scenes; in this case Technicolor color consultant James Gooch. This was his last film and as he so often did showed himself the master of the Technicolor three strip process. I have never seen better looking day for night scenes and much the in the studio process work comes out looking very natural. In fact  near the end  watch how  they take the day for night of our heroes looking from the cliff down at the  Indian village and cut to a shot of that Village shot in the studio but with continuous look of day for night. Other fine examples of his work can be seen in Singing in the RainAn American in Paris, Show Boat and Annie Get Your Gun.

John Ford, like Alfred Hitchcock, began  his career making silents. Like Hitchcock he is as teller of the story in pictures, not words. You can see this in the way he tells us the story of the kidnapped girl. First in her abduction and then in the discovery of it by Wayne and others.

For those that knock John Wayne as an actor he shows his range by the expression of horror when he sees the burnt out cabin. Also in his rage when he discovers and tries to hide the murder (and presumed rape) of the older daughter. "What do you want me to do? Spell it out for you?" Another favorite line is when Jeffery Hunter says, "I hope you die." Wayne snaps back, "That will be the day."

A great cast of wonderful supporting actors, many of  them Ford regulars that makes for at least a dozen great scenes in many different settings. And to top it off, one of Max Steiner's better and not so over the top score. I find myself haunted by this movie each time I see it.

"Let's go home, Debbie."

 

Always liked this picture; a 23 year old Marion Morrison, aka John Wayne. Wide-eyed innocence, with his whole future ahead of him. 

image

Last edited by mneeley490

Stray Dog -- 93 pts. What a great filmmaker was Akira Kurasawa. I haven't seen this film in about 20 years. This modern day (1949) story is of a rookie detective who's gun is stolen. He sets out to find it before it causes harm. At first it seems off. Kurasawa, untypically, uses narration to short hand the plot of the movie. Then the movie takes off and we see the master's great touch. This is really the first truly realized Kurasawa movie and has more than just a hint of things to come.

Hopefully everyone has seen at least the first of the Thin Man series--The Thin Man. I realized a few months ago William Powell was like the prototype for Cary Grant and all six in the series show him at his whimsical sophisticated best. However if you've never made it to the third one, Another Thin Man, you've never seen this short incredible dance. It has nothing to do with William Powell, or the plot, but it's something to see. Watch those feet.

Floor show at the Cuban Club

Last edited by The Old Man

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