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quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
I found the performance realistic and powerful [in Spotlight] .


Agree with you Seaquam. I know a ton of print journalists, a great many of whom remind me more of Ruffalo's character than any of the others. Journos are often a quirky lot.

Yeah, I didn't get this either, "...The slight hunch changes a centimeter scene-to-scene."

He was hunched differently within less than a 1/3 of an inch? The horror!
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Originally posted by Board-O:
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Originally posted by bman:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Revenant


Thoughts?


+1


I meant to rate the movie, sorry.

The film is a 'B' I think, but I'm giving it a B- for reasons I can't explain currently. Confused

I do think if anyone is interested in seeing the film, the cinema will reward. The film is shot in some beautiful parts of the world and was filmed using only natural light
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I meant to rate the movie, sorry.

The film is a 'B' I think, but I'm giving it a B- for reasons I can't explain currently. Confused

Maybe because it's being partially celebrated for how difficult it was to make. In other words--not a valid reason.


I'm just not sure. I am confident that when I watch the film again I will think better or worse, but not the same... There is just something I have yet to resolve.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Revenant


Thoughts?


+1


I meant to rate the movie, sorry.

The film is a 'B' I think, but I'm giving it a B- for reasons I can't explain currently. Confused

I do think if anyone is interested in seeing the film, the cinema will reward. The film is shot in some beautiful parts of the world and was filmed using only natural light


So, northern Alberta is beautiful? Gonna be there in a few weeks but the cold is too much for me!

Or were you referring to Argentina, where they had to go to finish the film because it became too warm in Alberta?
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Revenant


Thoughts?


+1


I meant to rate the movie, sorry.

The film is a 'B' I think, but I'm giving it a B- for reasons I can't explain currently. Confused

I do think if anyone is interested in seeing the film, the cinema will reward. The film is shot in some beautiful parts of the world and was filmed using only natural light


So, northern Alberta is beautiful? Gonna be there in a few weeks but the cold is too much for me!

Or were you referring to Argentina, where they had to go to finish the film because it became too warm in Alberta?


It was filmed in BC, Alberta and Argentina. I have no clue which part of the film was filmed where. Wink
Peggy Gunngenheim: Art Addict

Peggy and the great Clement Greenberg were truly the Pied Pipers of 20th century Modern Art.

Their influence from bohemian Paris through the Dadaist movement of Europe to the lifestyles of the bourgeoisie, art today over 100 years later still heeds to their shift in understanding and thinking.

The films offers insights to Peggy and her amazing influence and support. I would love to see a film focused on Clement.
just finished the Making a Murderer series on Netflix. I expected the boards to be lit up with discussion on this considering all the lawyers, but a search for the title and Steven Avery showed zilch.

An amazing documentary series (about 8 total hours) on what can go wrong when law enforcement and prosecutors aren't terribly interested in the truth.
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by Rothko:
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Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
Hobbit Battle of Five Armies


I figure if I say to myself "The Hobbit movies don't exist, The Hobbit movies don't exist" enough, it might come true.

I ignore the Hobbit movies like I pretend the second and third Matrix movies don't exist.


+1
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Train Wreck
Eh, it was mostly for the wife. Had a couple of good moments, but not enough to redeem it. I'm not sure what the buzz is all about with Amy Schumer.


Queue up season three of her regular show, and report back.


The serious & sad tones throughout this movie made it very awkward. It was a cringe fest...
The Last Witch Hunter: I know, the question you are probably asking is WHY!!? The answer . . . 14 hours of flights in the last 5 days! Thoroughly forgettable even though I think Vin Diesel movies are generally mildly entertaining

The Martian: I always seem to enjoy Matt Damon flicks and this was no different. Liked it but given the scenery I wish I had seen it on big screen

Hitman Agent 47: Why? See above! Actually this was a pretty decent flick for a no-need to think action only varietal

Ant Man: mildly entertaining. Again, reasonably good action flick

So, I'm starting off the year low brow but hoping to get back to some of the classics when I have some time to actually think about what I'm watching
The Lady in The Van--67pts. If I wasn't with my mom (who did like it) this would have been the second movie in a year I'd walked out on. Perhaps the worst soundtrack (in the context of the movie) I've ever heard. But...it does have a good payoff ending. If you dote on Maggie Smith, or films about old cantankerous women, you'll like it as much as my surrounding audience did.
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by bates40:
Spotlight.

Movie about investigation of Catholic Church in Boston.

Interesting, but hindered by the fact that most of the results of the investigation are already widely known to the public.

I find this an odd comment; it's not a suspense movie.


I ma not sure what the definition of a suspense movie is, but the movie focused on two (2) items in my viewing: (1) whether they story would be gathered and released to the public, after facing internal and external pressures, and, (2) if a competing newspaper would have access to the subjection information and be able to release it to the public prior to the Globe being able to do the same.

All good.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
bates40,

I'm honestly not trying to be obnoxious; but I'm wondering if you have the same problem with All the President's Men?



Same with Schindler's List, Apollo 13, Argo, Rush, 127 Hours, Seabiscuit, etc. There are many movies where the audience knows how it will end. The challenge for the director is maintaining high interest in spite of that as the plot progresses. Most of the time, they do a really good job of it.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
bates40,

I'm honestly not trying to be obnoxious; but I'm wondering if you have the same problem with All the President's Men?

(quietly) That's the first one that came to mind to me also.


Good point, and well taken. As a Catholic who has followed the inter workings of the priest abuse scandal I was much more aware of the situation and circumstances surrounding the catholic church than I was the inter workings of the investigative processes re: All the President's Men.
quote:
Originally posted by bates40:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
bates40,

I'm honestly not trying to be obnoxious; but I'm wondering if you have the same problem with All the President's Men?

(quietly) That's the first one that came to mind to me also.


Good point, and well taken. As a Catholic who has followed the inter workings of the priest abuse scandal I was much more aware of the situation and circumstances surrounding the catholic church than I was the inter workings of the investigative processes re: All the President's Men.

For what's it worth "inter" is a verb meaning to place in a grave. bunny

(I think I like the bunny the best.)
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
bates40,

I'm honestly not trying to be obnoxious; but I'm wondering if you have the same problem with All the President's Men?




Same with Schindler's List, Apollo 13, Argo, Rush, 127 Hours, Seabiscuit, etc. There are many movies where the audience knows how it will end. The challenge for the director is maintaining high interest in spite of that as the plot progresses. Most of the time, they do a really good job of it.


Shameful Titanic omission! ike
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by bates40:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
bates40,

I'm honestly not trying to be obnoxious; but I'm wondering if you have the same problem with All the President's Men?

(quietly) That's the first one that came to mind to me also.


Good point, and well taken. As a Catholic who has followed the inter workings of the priest abuse scandal I was much more aware of the situation and circumstances surrounding the catholic church than I was the inter workings of the investigative processes re: All the President's Men.

For what's it worth "inter" is a verb meaning to place in a grave. bunny

(I think I like the bunny the best.)


Inner workings
quote:
Originally posted by Wine Sparty:
Beauty & The Beast - family movie night. I had never seen it before, and I enjoyed it, but that's probably due to me having become a Disney nut. And my girls seemed to enjoy it, which is the most important thing.

This was the first movie we ever took our daughter to in the theater (way back when.) She was about 2 or 3 at the time. In the scene where Belle is imprisoned in the tower, looking out the window at the snow falling, and contemplating her captivity, my daughter suddenly yells out into the silent theater, "Merry Christmas, Belle!" Could've been embarrassing, but everyone in the theater laughed.
How weird, I watched FMJ this afternoon as I worked but I love it, much more than Platoon(80pts) or Casualties of War(60pts) for late Vietnam films. Kubrick was going to make a Holocaust film and he and someone else agreed to make FMJ based off a novel, something like that. There are some scenes that are similar to what you see in holocaust/WW2 films. The burning city battle areas look more like Nazi Germany war scenes than your typical jungle Vietnam films, and a whole bunch of little things that could be interpreted as holocaust messages.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
How weird, I watched FMJ this afternoon as I worked but I love it, much more than Platoon(80pts) or Casualties of War(60pts) for late Vietnam films. Kubrick was going to make a Holocaust film and he and someone else agreed to make FMJ based off a novel, something like that. There are some scenes that are similar to what you see in holocaust/WW2 films. The burning city battle areas look more like Nazi Germany war scenes than your typical jungle Vietnam films, and a whole bunch of little things that could be interpreted as holocaust messages.

I appreciate what you're saying, but I don't see your last point.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Full Metal Jacket--72pts.

Same question I had when I saw this in 1987: Why did Kubrick even bother to make this movie? More than 15 years since the war ended and nothing fresh or interesting to say about it or even war in general.


I guess the entertainment value of the opening scenes and the visceral reaction was lost on you.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Full Metal Jacket--72pts.

Same question I had when I saw this in 1987: Why did Kubrick even bother to make this movie? More than 15 years since the war ended and nothing fresh or interesting to say about it or even war in general.


I guess the entertainment value of the opening scenes and the visceral reaction was lost on you.


The boot camp scenes are classic, along with the Vietnam hooker scene. After that, I turn off the movie.
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Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:

Kelly's Heroes

Kind of silly, but (retrospectively) a pretty cool cast if you were a child of the 70's.


Love this movie, especially Oddball. "I'm drinking wine and eating cheese, and catching some rays, you know."

Saw it in the theater and even as a young hippie I couldn't buy Sutherland's hippie in WWII character. But it was a fun stupid movie.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
Tried to go see Hail Caesar yesterday but matinee was sold out by the time we go there


Saw it today: **. Coen Bros. weakest effort in memory. Pass.


Do you generally like their films? My parents were visiting us in Key West and my mom wanted to go - that was the main reason we tried to see it.
I saw Hail Caesar yesterday in a fairly empty theater. (Film ending around kickoff may have been the cause).

Movie was lightweight and enjoyable but not worthy of the high praise it received from critics. Basically *** not ****. Those who enjoy look backs at idealized movie history will like it the most which might explain why critics liked it so much. Other than Brolin, virtually everyone else had not much more than a cameo.

Neil
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Saw it in the theater and even as a young hippie I couldn't buy Sutherland's hippie in WWII character.


I think he was still high from MASH.


Careful talking about Rob's uncle. Wink

1st cousin, twice removed actually (at least I think that's how it works? He and my grandfather were 1st cousins.). Nice man, son's a git.
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
Tried to go see Hail Caesar yesterday but matinee was sold out by the time we go there


Saw it today: **. Coen Bros. weakest effort in memory. Pass.


Do you generally like their films? My parents were visiting us in Key West and my mom wanted to go - that was the main reason we tried to see it.


Yes. Fargo, Big Lebowski, and No Country for Old Men are among the best films I've ever seen. Inside Llewyn Davis and Raising Arizona are up there as well.

I didn't care much for Hail, Caesar! because I felt it had flimsy plot lines, an unsatisfying McGuffin, A-List actors without much to do (ScarJo, Ralph Fiennes). Sure there were some clever references to yesteryear, but whatever. It felt hurried and chucked together to make a deadline, without the usual Coen Brothers script wizardry.

That said, it has its merits, there are far worse ways to spend two hours. Great costuming and sets, and Tilda Swinton was a joy to watch.
Last edited by indybob
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
an oldie - The Magnificent Ambersons
It was a university copy lent to me and I don't know if it's any different than the original. This is my favorite Welles film.

Unfortunately there is no original as in a pure Welles version. This, and all prints, are the version with heavy edits done by the studio when Welles was out of the country. Unlike in the happy ending for the original Touch of Evil (also cut for the worse by the studios), there are no known copies of the deleted clips.

A great comparison is to watch Tim Holt, in a slightly more common location for him, in The Treasure of The Sierra Madre.
A slew of mediocre flicks lately:

White House Down & Olympus Has Fallen
-->not sure which of these "White house gets taken over by terrorists" movies came out first but they are almost identical. Literally, there are some action sequences that one movie must have "borrowed" from the other
--neither movie is all that good

Sleeping with other people: fun romantic comedy. Saw this on a flight but could imagine watching this with my wife during a low-key date night

Mr. X: an Indian flick I saw on a flight. Silly and ridiculous, but I had 8 hours to spare. It barely held my attention for its 2 hours and I had to take a break from it on 3 occasions but I suffered through. The only redeeming quality was the amazingly beautiful lead actress, but I suspect she really was a model posing as an actress for this flick