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quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Alphaville

I've mentioned before that I love this untypical Godard work. Everything is unique from turning the "City of Lights" into a nightmarish backdrop through creative cinematography to creating the voice of the Alpha 60 computer from the speech of a man who'd lost his vocal cords so speaks using the burping technique that many learn to do.

The actors are each special. Eddie Constantine, the pock-marked stoic actor, portrays secret agent Lemmie Caution who drives a Ford Galaxie from the Outlands. Enigmatic actress Anna Karina plays the woman he tries to save. Lemmie, (who narrates to film more successfully than Harrison Ford in Blade Runner) refers to her "pretty sphinx face." And finally a surprise to see Akim Tamiroff as the missing agent Caution is looking for.

The film is loaded with memorable scenes that stuck with me for years in between re-watches. One example is the martyrs who are executed while standing on a swimming pool's diving board reciting anti-government slogans. Then they are shot and fall in the water.

I give this film a 96 while giving the previously mentioned Blade Runner (a failed attempt to blend noir and science fiction that Alphaville succeeds at on a shoe string budget and no special effects) a 79.


Cool
I read Night Train to Lisbon about three years ago and enjoyed it a great deal.

I started the book on a train heading to Vienna and our daughter was in Lisbon at the time lecturing, but digress. Smile

I heard today a movie of this book has been made and will open in Dallas next month/week. I hope it will be a good adaptation of a fine book.
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

A great little movie. I'm on a bit of a Roald Dahl run this week - saw 36 Hours a few days ago.

And I wonder if Ian Fleming could have foreseen the same actor playing his Goldfinger villain and Baron Bomburst.

And I remember watching this in college and all the guys simultaneously screaming when Benny Hill appears as the toymaker.

Great fun all around.
Hunger Games: Catching Fire
Plot holes the size of Wisconsin, if not the entire Great Lakes region. Nevertheless it is a very enjoyable ride with real actors, real nuance and character development, great production values, and real intrigue. 2 hours, 25 minutes zips by. Very much enjoyed despite its obvious shortcomings. I think this Jennifer Lawrence girl might be a decent actress. Wink B/B+

RED 2
Mindless, incomprehensible plot. Fun despite itself. C+

Get Shorty
For the 6th or 7th time. Wonderful film. Probably Sonnenfeld's best. Travolta looks younger in it than I remember. B+ / A-

Ok... and... so a few pages back tanglenet name-checked this film as if, "oh yeah, everyone has seen that..." and it was playing for free On Demand, so I figured, "how bad could it be? I mean it stars Michael Cain!" So...

Blame it on Rio
Wow. WOW. WOW. OHMYGOD! Pervy doesn't even... just... ew. EWW. Every scene, every word is SO ew. I mean the 17 year old (age at the time of hiring, dunno if she was 17 or 18 while filming; the character is definitely supposed to be 17 or 18, though -- probably 17) is really really hot. So, there is that. But wow. I mean HOLY CRAP. PERRRRVVYYYYY! Wow. Once I realized what I was in for I was able to sit back and enjoy it as a "so bad, so MIND BOGGLINGLY offensive, misogynistic, creepy and PERVY, it is incredibly funny, but for the wrong reasons" thing. But WOWOWOWOWOWOW. This might be the single dirtiest-old-man-thought-process mainstream movie I have ever seen. Ever. It was directed by the guy who directed Singin' in the Rain!!!! Wow. Pervy. Q- (But still worth checking out as an oddity if you have the right sense of humor.)
Last edited by winetarelli
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:

Ok... and... so a few pages back tanglenet name-checked this film as if, "oh yeah, everyone has seen that..." and it was playing for free On Demand, so I figured, "how bad could it be? I mean it stars Michael Cain!" So...

Blame it on Rio
Wow. WOW. WOW. OHMYGOD! Pervy doesn't even... just... ew. EWW. Every scene, every word is SO ew. I mean the 17 year old (age at the time of hiring, dunno if she was 17 or 18 while filming; the character is definitely supposed to be 17 or 18, though -- probably 17) is really really hot. So, there is that. But wow. I mean HOLY CRAP. PERRRRVVYYYYY! Wow. Once I realized what I was in for I was able to sit back and enjoy it as a "so bad, so MIND BOGGLINGLY offensive, misogynistic, creepy and PERVY, it is incredibly funny, but for the wrong reasons" thing. But WOWOWOWOWOWOW. This might be the single dirtiest-old-man-thought-process mainstream movie I have ever seen. Ever. It was directed by the guy who directed Singin' in the Rain!!!! Wow. Pervy. Q- (But still worth checking out as an oddity if you have the right sense of humor.)


Yup. That's my memory too. Didn't know about the director. Too bad.
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:

Ok... and... so a few pages back tanglenet name-checked this film as if, "oh yeah, everyone has seen that..." and it was playing for free On Demand, so I figured, "how bad could it be? I mean it stars Michael Cain!" So...

Blame it on Rio
Wow. WOW. WOW. OHMYGOD! Pervy doesn't even... just... ew. EWW. Every scene, every word is SO ew. I mean the 17 year old (age at the time of hiring, dunno if she was 17 or 18 while filming; the character is definitely supposed to be 17 or 18, though -- probably 17) is really really hot. So, there is that. But wow. I mean HOLY CRAP. PERRRRVVYYYYY! Wow. Once I realized what I was in for I was able to sit back and enjoy it as a "so bad, so MIND BOGGLINGLY offensive, misogynistic, creepy and PERVY, it is incredibly funny, but for the wrong reasons" thing. But WOWOWOWOWOWOW. This might be the single dirtiest-old-man-thought-process mainstream movie I have ever seen. Ever. It was directed by the guy who directed Singin' in the Rain!!!! Wow. Pervy. Q- (But still worth checking out as an oddity if you have the right sense of humor.)


Yup. That's my memory too. Didn't know about the director. Too bad.

Seriously. What a way to go out...
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:

Ok... and... so a few pages back tanglenet name-checked this film as if, "oh yeah, everyone has seen that..." and it was playing for free On Demand, so I figured, "how bad could it be? I mean it stars Michael Cain!" So...

Blame it on Rio
Wow. WOW. WOW. OHMYGOD! Pervy doesn't even... just... ew. EWW. Every scene, every word is SO ew. I mean the 17 year old (age at the time of hiring, dunno if she was 17 or 18 while filming; the character is definitely supposed to be 17 or 18, though -- probably 17) is really really hot. So, there is that. But wow. I mean HOLY CRAP. PERRRRVVYYYYY! Wow. Once I realized what I was in for I was able to sit back and enjoy it as a "so bad, so MIND BOGGLINGLY offensive, misogynistic, creepy and PERVY, it is incredibly funny, but for the wrong reasons" thing. But WOWOWOWOWOWOW. This might be the single dirtiest-old-man-thought-process mainstream movie I have ever seen. Ever. It was directed by the guy who directed Singin' in the Rain!!!! Wow. Pervy. Q- (But still worth checking out as an oddity if you have the right sense of humor.)


Yup. That's my memory too. Didn't know about the director. Too bad.

Seriously. What a way to go out...


This aired frequently in the early days of HBO and Showtime. I was a kid and enjoyed the nudity but even then knew it was creepy.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
True Grit (Coen brothers version)

A very well regarded and yet still under-appreciated movie, imo. I never ever like westerns, though I've tried. This, however, I loved.


On the surface, it doesn't seem like a Coen brothers film. It comes across as a straight ahead mainstream Hollywood product. But the dialog is fantastic. So sharp. And I always love Roger Deakins' cinematography.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Broken Embraces

Kind of a trend toward movies that are about, or deal with, movie making. One of my favorites of the genre is The Stunt Man with Peter O'Toole in a role he was absolutely made for--an omnipotent director. His great line that says it all, "If God could do the tricks that we can do he'd be a happy man."
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Broken Embraces

Kind of a trend toward movies that are about, or deal with, movie making. One of my favorites of the genre is The Stunt Man with Peter O'Toole in a role he was absolutely made for--an omnipotent director. His great line that says it all, "If God could do the tricks that we can do he'd be a happy man."

The Stunt Man was one of my early favs. O'Toole did a fantastic job. When I was in San Diego, I had to stop by the Hotel Del Coronado to admire the place it was shot.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:

The Stunt Man with Peter O'Toole


It has been a long time since I watched this film.

The DVD has the story of director's Richard Rush's 9 year struggle to get the film made. According to information without citation on Wikipedia:
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Rush directed three films for AIP in the late 1960s exploring counter-cultures of the period and also introducing racking focus, a technique Rush claims to have discovered and named. I'm not sure I buy this, I seem to remember it from other movies. Rush's first studio effort was 1970's Getting Straight, starring Elliott Gould and Candice Bergen. The film did well commercially and was deemed by Swedish director Ingmar Bergman to be the "best American film of the decade."

I saw this hippiedom film when it came out in 1970 it was made for our demographic. It was not the best film of the decade.

quote:
In 1981, Truffaut was asked "Who is your favorite American director?" He answered, "I don’t know his name, but I saw his film last night and it was called The Stunt Man."

Possibly true. Note that Truffaut, would make his own love letter to filmmaking--the aforementioned Day For Night.

Richard Rush struggled for years with Hollywood and finally gave up almost twenty years ago. This quote for the LA Times film critic says it all, "Rush’s career seems to be followed by the kind of miserable luck that never seems to afflict the untalented.

Perhaps we should try an online film club thread? Everyone watch the same movie and then about two weeks later open it up for discussion. I would suggest The Stunt Man, not that it's the greatest film ever made, though I love it, but it has many points worth discussing.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
Without checking the internet (or check it if you must), anyone know whatever happened to Steve Railsback (sp?), who I believe starred in the movie?


I had to check IMDB. Looks like his career didn't exactly take off. Though it seems he's worked steady, except for a one-off appearance in the new Twilight Zone, and X-Files, I have seen nothing else he's appeared in.
quote:
Originally posted by Adam10:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
The Conjuring

I was in the mood for a good horror movie. Unfortunately, I didn't get one. OK at best.


I heard it was terrifying from a mate who's big into scary. I'd never watch that anyway. I don't understand people that want to get scared. Something wrong, there.

It starts absurd, has every horror genre cliché in the book, and picks up enough to make it watchable. Also it's nice to see Lili Taylor. Note that the woman who plays "psychic" Lorraine Warren is Vera Farmiga. Her sister, Taissa Farmiga, is in the far superior horror TV show, American Horror Story.

79pts.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:


Gerhard Richter Painting -- though I recognized the name and a couple of the works shown in the film, I really didn't know anything about him. Pretty slow overall but I found it interesting.


One of the greatest living artist, and Eric Clapton knows his work. He recently sold a Richter piece for $34 million. Cool
Just watched this the other night on Netflix (currently streaming - highly recommend for the art enthusiast). I loved it! What a vulnerable capture of a great artist. What a special mind and talent...Ausgezeichnet!
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Conversation

I've said it before, and I'll say it again, Coppola's only good movie.


I have said it before and I will say it again, The Godfather & The Godfather II are wonderful. Razz

What do you know about movies? Razz Razz Razz


LOL
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Big Sleep

I know which one, but there is that strange, transplanted to England, Robert Mitchum version.


First off, I hope you spit after bringing that movie up. Wink

I'm also a little disappointed with your short reply. Razz As you know, there is a lot to write/talk about with this movie. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Big Sleep

I know which one, but there is that strange, transplanted to England, Robert Mitchum version.


First off, I hope you spit after bringing that movie up. Wink

I'm also a little disappointed with your short reply. Razz As you know, there is a lot to write/talk about with this movie. Wink

It's coming. Too busy (!) to write before.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Big Sleep

I know which one, but there is that strange, transplanted to England, Robert Mitchum version.


First off, I hope you spit after bringing that movie up. Wink

I'm also a little disappointed with your short reply. Razz As you know, there is a lot to write/talk about with this movie. Wink

It's coming. Too busy (!) to write before.


I'm thinking I know where you are going.
The Big Sleep
Raymond Chandler was not a great detective story writer, he was a great writer who wrote detective stories. Before him Dashiell Hammett had almost single handedly created the image of the California hard boiled detective. His short stories of the 20's were about a frequently nameless Continental Op(erative) who solved mysteries. His greatest achievement in this genre was the 1930 novel, The Maltese Falcon featuring the detective with a great name--Sam Spade. The story was adapted twice for the movies before John Huston directed Humphrey Bogart in the definitive version in 1941. The film is a fairly strict adaptation of the book with Bogart simply becoming Spade and defining the film detective for all future films up to and beyond Blade Runner.

Chandler was an oil executive who at the age of 44 wrote his first detective short story. These were sold to pulp fiction magazines like Hammett's were. Reading Chandler's collected short stories you can see pages that were then pretty much carried word for word into his novels. Starting late in life, he only wrote 8 novels. Hammett wrote even less--5. Chandler's first was The Big Sleep in 1939. He carries on the hard-boiled tradition with the detective Phillip Marlowe working amongst the seedy side of Los Angeles. Nasty things occur among the richest and the poorest of its inhabitants and Marlowe is the incorruptible knight who charges into their midst righting wrongs.

While Chandler continues the writing style of Hammett he is the master of spare, evocative language. Here is the opening of his first novel, The Big Sleep :
quote:
IT WAS ABOUT ELEVEN O’CLOCK in the morning, mid October, with the sun not shining and a look of hard wet rain in the clearness of the foothills. I was wearing my powder-blue suit, with dark blue shirt, tie and display handkerchief, black brogues, black wool socks with dark blue clocks on them. I was neat, clean, shaved and sober, and I didn’t care who knew it. I was everything the well-dressed private detective ought to be. I was calling on four million dollars.

The main hallway of the Sternwood place was two stories high. Over the entrance doors, which would have let in a troop of Indian elephants, there was a broad stained-glass panel showing a knight in dark armor rescuing a lady who was tied to a tree and didn’t have any clothes on but some very long and convenient hair. The knight had pushed the vizor of his helmet back to be sociable, and he was fiddling with the knots on the ropes that tied the lady to the tree and not getting anywhere. I stood there and thought that if I lived in the house, I would sooner or later have to climb up there and help him. He didn’t seem to be really trying.


Now compare the two movies, both with Bogart, both feature a California detective. The movie of The Maltese Falcon is a miracle of perfect casting (Bogart [finally broken out of the gangster mold], Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, (the slightly too melodramatic) Mary Astor and Elijah Cook Jr. as the "cheap gunsel") and the great direction of Huston. And somehow it happened again in the more modern California detective story-- The Big Sleep . Bogart again personifies the lead character. Cook Jr. is back as a sad, but braver soul, and many great, but pretty much unknown today actors are featured such as slimy John Ridgley as Eddie Mars and dangerous looking Bob Steele as Lash Canino. Another great director is at the helm, Howard Hawks, but what makes the movie sing is a 20 year old actress, Lauren Bacall.

Bacall had appeared opposite Bogart in To Have and To Have Not when she was 19 and Bogart was already 45. Their chemistry could not be denied and was on full display a year later in The Big Sleep. And here is a tale of how chance and vision can lead to greatness. The movie was ready in 1945, but due to the need to release the American WWII movies during the war years, it was not released until 1946. The original version was shown to some overseas serviceman in 1945, but that version was pretty much unseen until 1997. Both versions are on the DVD and they are a revelation.

In the 1945 original version the relation between Bogart and Bacall is fairly tame (actually keeping more in line with book.) During a major scene Bacall's face is pretty much hidden by a fishnet veil that was popular at the time. It was Bacall's agent who wrote to Warner Bros. to get scenes reshot and to bring out Bacall's sex appeal. And obvious example is that instead of the veil Bacall is full on sexy and she delivers the delicious double entendre loaded scene about controlling a man the way she would ride a horse.

The film contains at least 20 memorable great scenes and dozens of quotable lines. A major part is due to the fantastic adaptation (that does not feel the need to be faithful to the novel) by the too short-lived, dependable Leigh Brackett, Jules Furthman, who co-wrote this and To Have and To Have Not with William Faulkner (!)

Examples of non-stop wonderful scenes: Bogart's scene with Bacall's naughty younger sister play by Martha Vickers. From the book the original lines, "Tall aren't you?" "I didn't mean to be." Since Bogart wasn't tall becomes, "You're not very tall." "Well, I, uh, I try to be." Supposedly the actress Martha Vicker's scenes were cut because she was too hot and they didn't want to take anything away from Bacall.

Into the hothouse with the orchids that General Sternwood says are, "Nasty things. Their flesh is too much like the flesh of men, and their perfume has the rotten sweetness of corruption." Changed, and improved, from "prostitutes" in the novel.)

Right after this Bogart has his first meeting with Bacall (one of the General's two "wild daughters.")
On the way out Bogart, who was told to see Bacall earlier by the butler, tells the butler he was mistake, she didn't want to see him, "Mrs. Ruttledge (Bacall) didn't want to see me." To which the butler responds that he is often wrong.

Scene after great scene roll on. The house where Carmen is photographed for blackmail purpose--so much atmosphere, it's a wonder of photography and lighting. Bogart playing a fey character to get information from Geiger's tough female assistant, her, "First it's 'ceramics'..." The woman cab drive who hits on Bogart and the one who gets him in Acme's books when she takes off the glasses, puts down her hair and turns into the hot Dorothy Malone who apparently has sex with in the aisles of the book shop. Bacall singing! and gambling. Elijah Cook Jr. going to the final degree to save the woman he loves, the one who has no interest in him.

And everyone's fav, "Such a lot of guns around town and so few brains!" Here I'm just going to link the IMDB quote page. For those who've seen the movie each one can be replayed in your head and re-visualized. Quote from The Big Sleep

Last I'd like to address the point about the plot not being totally logical. Who cares! Actually I don't think most people even notice it. The power, and fun, of the movie makes plot holes superfluous. Our fave Hitchcock never let plot problems stop him from making a great film-going experience. Just sit back, watch The Big Sleep for hopefully the fifth or sixth time and let its magic wash over you and carry you away to (cliché time) when movies were movies.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Conversation

I've said it before, and I'll say it again, Coppola's only good movie.


I have said it before and I will say it again, The Godfather & The Godfather II are wonderful. Razz


Yes.

The Godfather is my favorite movie of all time. Both The Godfather, Part II and Apocalypse Now are top 50 for me (with II probably ahead of Apocalypse Now.)
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Conversation

I've said it before, and I'll say it again, Coppola's only good movie.


I have said it before and I will say it again, The Godfather & The Godfather II are wonderful. Razz


Yes.

The Godfather is my favorite movie of all time. Both The Godfather, Part II and Apocalypse Now are top 50 for me (with II probably ahead of Apocalypse Now.)

The problem with The Godfather is these people appear to have no fun. Everything goes from one serious moment to another without them getting even the slightest enjoyment out of their lives. Even the endless opening wedding scene seems to consist of people going through the expected motions. All too grim.

See the best movie of the genre Goodfellas and TV's best (though flawed) gangster show The Sopranos for a more balanced view of "the business."
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
The problem with The Godfather is these people appear to have no fun. Everything goes from one serious moment to another without them getting even the slightest enjoyment out of their lives. Even the endless opening wedding scene seems to consist of people going through the expected motions. All too grim.



I agree that The Godfather I and II are grim. But if you're talking about characters who don't get the slightest enjoyment out of their lives, Gene Hackman in The Conversation is the poster boy. Except for his jazz & sax.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
The problem with The Godfather is these people appear to have no fun. Everything goes from one serious moment to another without them getting even the slightest enjoyment out of their lives. Even the endless opening wedding scene seems to consist of people going through the expected motions. All too grim.



I agree that The Godfather I and II are grim. But if you're talking about characters who don't get the slightest enjoyment out of their lives, Gene Hackman in The Conversation is the poster boy. Except for his jazz & sax.

But this is his character. I refuse to believe that no one in The Godfather's world never had a good time.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle John:
Monsters University with the kids

I think Monster's Inc. is an excellent movie and easily Pixar's best. M.U. was a very good, if unnecessary, sequel (prequel.)


Okay, you have me on this one. Wink

Finally one that I like that W+A hasn't seen! Put M.I right onto your must watch list--better than Bergman any day.
quote:
The problem with The Godfather is these people appear to have no fun. Everything goes from one serious moment to another without them getting even the slightest enjoyment out of their lives. Even the endless opening wedding scene seems to consist of people going through the expected motions. All too grim.

See the best movie of the genre Goodfellas and TV's best (though flawed) gangster show The Sopranos for a more balanced view of "the business."


I dunno. My grandfather was at the wedding the opening scene is allegedly based upon. But there is certainly joy in The Godfather. Brando when playing with his grandson comes to mind (although that scene ends...). I recall other times, though I cannot think on what they are.

Believe me, I've seen Goodfellas several times, and 90% of The Sopranos episodes over its entire run. I strongly disagree that these are better, or at, or near the quality of The Godfather. I would also put The Godfather, Part II ahead of both. Hell, I'd put The Freshman way ahead of any Sopranos episode. (Except maybe the college visit with Meadow and "The Pine Barons" which were my two favorite episodes.) Razz Wink
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I don't understand the comparison of the mafia portrayal between The Godfather and Sopranos. One is about 5 hours and the other is 5+ seasons. There is plenty of time to show the daily mafia lifestyle over several years versus one or two movies. Goodfellas is not even in the same league.

Goodfellas is Scorsese's one masterpiece. The Sopranos is groundbreaking television that way overstayed its welcome. The Godfather's grim tone is a choice that Coppola made--it's not due to a restriction/limitation of time.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Tale of Two Cities ( 1935)

Dallas/Fort Worth?


Razz

Have you watched this film?

I think I saw it in English class. Unfortunately being forced to read the book made me closed off to the movie. I have seen parts of it on TV since then. Who could better read the "Far, far better thing..." line than Ronald Coleman? And was there ever a Disney villainess who could touch Blanche Yurka as Madame De Farge?
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:

Unfortunately being forced to read the book


You did not enjoy Dickens historical novel? Eek

Not in 8th grade. Sometimes teachers can turn you off to great things--however note that my least favorite English teacher, in freshman high school year, turned me on to my still favorite Shakespeare play, Julius Caesar.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Fifth Horseman is Fear

Didn't you watch this less than 4 months ago? Was it an encore viewing?


May have. I have movies on my laptop and iPad, and depending which one I travel with determines what movies I will watch.

I plan on adding many over the holidays. It has been over a year since I last juggled them. Wink

Excellent movie. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Raquel Welch's body.


Nuff said.

PH

Had another funny Raquel moment about 7 years later. Saw the not-as-good-as-one-wished The Last of Sheila. It takes place on a yacht. After changing Raquel comes out in the bikini with her pneumatically inflated body, which we found funny. She is followed by the totally, naturally hot Dyan Cannon in a white bikini that I can still see in my mind 40 years (!) later.
I've got Holiday Inn and my favorite christmas movie, A Child's Christmas in Wales queued up for tomorrow night.

This week-end will see The Snowman, Jimmny Cricket's Christmas (with Donald v Chip&Dale the highlight), Frosty, Rudolph and Charlie Brown during the day with A Christmas Story, White Christmas, National Lampoon and Home Alone during the evening.
Its that time of year...

Planning a Hobbit viewing today. Will hit American Hustle, Her, and The Wolf of Wall Street (when it comes out on Christmas) all in the next 10 days... Anchorman 2, Philomena, Nebraska, Frozen, and Saving Mister Banks are all possible views in the next few weeks as well, but so far, none of them are on the 'immediate must' list... It seems like possibly a very good crop this year. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Its that time of year...

Planning a Hobbit viewing today. Will hit American Hustle, Her, and The Wolf of Wall Street (when it comes out on Christmas) all in the next 10 days... Anchorman 2, Philomena, Nebraska, Frozen, and Saving Mister Banks are all possible views in the next few weeks as well, but so far, none of them are on the 'immediate must' list... It seems like possibly a very good crop this year. Smile


Stop being SO pedestrian. Razz

Add The Great Beauty to your list.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Its that time of year...

Planning a Hobbit viewing today.

I'm a Lord of The Rings fan, but I could only make it through 20 minutes of this overblown pad-fest (noun--a bloated film loaded with unnecessary scenes) attempt to cash in on LOTR's success. There should have only been a single film of The Hobbit.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Its that time of year...

Planning a Hobbit viewing today.

I'm a Lord of The Rings fan, but I could only make it through 20 minutes of this overblown pad-fest (noun--a bloated film loaded with unnecessary scenes) attempt to cash in on LOTR's success. There should have only been a single film of The Hobbit.


Amen. Someday I hope to take all 3 Hobbit films and edit them down. Will probably make a really decent 3 hour movie.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Its that time of year...

Planning a Hobbit viewing today.

I'm a Lord of The Rings fan, but I could only make it through 20 minutes of this overblown pad-fest (noun--a bloated film loaded with unnecessary scenes) attempt to cash in on LOTR's success. There should have only been a single film of The Hobbit.


Amen. Someday I hope to take all 3 Hobbit films and edit them down. Will probably make a really decent 3 hour movie.

Yes, my suggestion was Jackson make a new kind of director's cut when it comes out on DVD--instead of adding scenes best left on the editing room floor, he cuts off 7.5 hours.
Last edited by The Old Man
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Its that time of year...

Planning a Hobbit viewing today.

I'm a Lord of The Rings fan, but I could only make it through 20 minutes of this overblown pad-fest (noun--a bloated film loaded with unnecessary scenes) attempt to cash in on LOTR's success. There should have only been a single film of The Hobbit.

Agreed the first Hobbit movie was waaaaaaayyy too long. Still haves hopes for this being decent, also feel somewhat obligated on account of my huge love of LOTR. But point taken. Jackson is so involved in creating the world that he neglects plot and pacing.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by winetarelli:
Its that time of year...

Planning a Hobbit viewing today. Will hit American Hustle, Her, and The Wolf of Wall Street (when it comes out on Christmas) all in the next 10 days... Anchorman 2, Philomena, Nebraska, Frozen, and Saving Mister Banks are all possible views in the next few weeks as well, but so far, none of them are on the 'immediate must' list... It seems like possibly a very good crop this year. Smile


Stop being SO pedestrian. Razz

Add The Great Beauty to your list.

Haven't heard of it but will look. I'm thinking I'm going to wait for the blu-ray of Blue is the Warmest Color. Banana
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
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Originally posted by sunnylea57:
The triumvirate of Christmas viewing starts tonight:

White Christmas
It's a Wonderful Life

and best of all...

A Christmas Carol (1951 Alistair Sim version)


you forgot Christmas Vacation..

It looked to me like he was only watching good movies.


Fanny and Alexander
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Originally posted by winetarelli:
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Originally posted by Juicy:
12 Years a Slave

I loved it and posted a review a few pages back. What did you think?


I really enjoyed your review. Big Grin



The movie was wonderful and yet numbing due to the topic and candid presentation. Nothing held back, in your face brutality often causing more damage emotionally than physically. Intense.
American Hustle

(We got the timing for The Hobbit wrong so saw this today instead. Maybe I'll visit Middle Earth tomorrow...)

When this movie was nominated for the Golden Globes in the 'Comedy' section I vaguely grimaced, assuming, like Inside Llewyn Davis it is a drama with a few humorous moments -- but definitely not a comedy -- and the HFPA just wanted to nominate the ten films, actors, and actresses they wanted to nominate. Even before the movie begins, however, in the very first frame, I realized, nope. This could actually be bordering on tongue-in-cheek dramedy, or even "serious comedy". By the end of the movie it is more clear; while not a comedy per se, it also isn't neatly categorizable as anything else.

Whatever the case, it is a lot of fun.

The plot focuses on two (at least somewhat fictitious) con-people in 1978 -- played by Amy Adams and Christian Bale -- and their role in the Abscam scandal (something I was not yet alive for, know nothing about, and that did not seem to matter). Also integral to the cast are Bradly Cooper as an FBI agent and Jennifer Lawrence as Bale's wife. Louis C.K. and Jeremy Renner play smaller supporting roles, more comic and more dramatic, respectively, and both are excellent.

I really really liked this movie. Not quite 'loved', only because it isn't that type of movie. It isn't *meant* to stay with you or make you think about big things. It is meant to be 2 hours and 10 minutes of fun that you can actually feel good about having. And on that it fully delivers. (In fact, it feels shorter than it is and I was almost sad there wasn't more when it ended.)

The writing, direction and editing are very clean with no loose ends but also with every included frame serving a purpose. Direction happens to be excellent and includes just enough quick zooms and cut-aways to keep the pacing just slightly more quick than a typical movie of this caliber. Halfway through I was reminded of a review I read comparing David O. Russel's direction of this to Scorsese. I had forgotten, but all of the sudden pacing and timing images of The Departed came into my consciousness and it wasn't long before my mind made the jump to Scorsese, generally. (Especially Goodfellas and later works.)

The makeup could be just slightly better, perhaps, but the wardrobe is wonderful. It isn't "Oh hey look, it is the 70's let's make fun of what people wore then." It treats the time with certain respect...

Speaking of wardrobe and respect, I think I "respect" Amy Adams more now than I ever have. Wow. WOW. Her acting was wonderful, too. Her acting was very honest and of the four leads, she was playing it most naturally, whereas the other three leads have a certain theatrical flare to their performances (while still remaining fundamentally honest.) Adams was just brilliant, as she always is. Bradley Cooper was excellent but the least of the four. Not necessarily "worse" acting than the other three, but he did not quite command the screen the way the others did. Bale and Lawrence were both dynamite; just out of the park. I never could have imagined Bale in a shlubby role like this, but he is so oddly charming (very oddly) that you can *almost* see why these women like him. Jennifer Lawrence... more so than in any other movie of hers, just owns every scene she is in. She had such screen presence in this movie that even though most of her scenes are with Bale, she is all you can look at on the screen. Also it was fascinating to see her play a somewhat unlikable character and nail it so.

All-in-all I had a great time. It isn't an historically good movie, but it is a phenomenal way to spend a guilt-free "fun" afternoon at the movies. A-