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quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
Blue Jasmine

Enjoyed very much.


We saw this yesterday too. Didn't Woody Allen used to make comedies?


I guess you need to watch Stardust Memories for that question. At this point in this career I'd say at 20% of his movies aren't comedies. They are simply movies for adults.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
Blue Jasmine

Enjoyed very much.


We saw this yesterday too. Didn't Woody Allen used to make comedies?


At this point in this career I'd say at 20% of his movies aren't comedies. They are simply movies for adults masochists and/or sadists .
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
I guess you need to watch Stardust Memories for that question. At this point in this career I'd say at 20% of his movies aren't comedies. They are simply movies for adults.


I was being facetious Old Man. Big fan and I believe I have seen every movie he's made. While I wouldn't have wanted him to make Love & Death over and over again, I do miss his neurotic comedy a little.

Rob, I wondered when (and who) the Woody-haters would chime in. KSC02 probably isn't far behind you.
There are enough of us to make me realize there isn't anything wrong with me. I did live a long time thinking what am I missing that I detest all of his work so so much?

I have had internal dialogues while watching some of his movies debating the merits of forks or spoons to gouge out my eyes. Sporks were the natural and clear winner.
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
Flipping channels last night and wound up watching Master and Commander - not bad. Not sure why I never watched it before but enjoyed it.


I have quite a few friends that worked on that movie (many of the people huddled around the scene during the skull surgery are actual real sailors) and it's one of my few regrets that I didn't at the time go down to Mexico to work on it as well. They all had a blast sailing around for a few months.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I really enjoyed that movie (bought the DVD) and wished they had made more of them from the series.

I think it was very good, but unfortunately it didn't do the boxoffice to justify continuing. Perhaps it would have been better as a TV series like the very good, not great, Hornblower from England.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I really enjoyed that movie (bought the DVD) and wished they had made more of them from the series.

I think it was very good, but unfortunately it didn't do the boxoffice to justify continuing. Perhaps it would have been better as a TV series like the very good, not great, Hornblower from England.


Russell Crowe was also horrendously difficult to deal with, did not like being there or doing the movie and there were multiple delays while his black eyes healed from the fights he regularly got into at the bar. I suppose the producers didn't fight hard for more...
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I really enjoyed that movie (bought the DVD) and wished they had made more of them from the series.

I think it was very good, but unfortunately it didn't do the boxoffice to justify continuing. Perhaps it would have been better as a TV series like the very good, not great, Hornblower from England.


Russell Crowe was also horrendously difficult to deal with, did not like being there or doing the movie and there were multiple delays while his black eyes healed from the fights he regularly got into at the bar. I suppose the producers didn't fight hard for more...

And that is different from every other movie he has done, how?
quote:
Originally posted by Juicy:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Juicy:
The Butler


What did you think?


Really enjoyed it. Lots of great characters and what a time in history to be a "fly on the wall" from the Eisenhower to the Reagan Administrations. Difficult to cram three decades plus of history, the Civil Rights movement, interactions with various Presidents, and personal history into a two hour film. There are already some complaints of re-writing history if it is based on the life of Eugene Allen. Lots going on if you are a history buff.


Saw this tonight. Great acting by Forrest Whitaker--a sure Oscar nomineee, and probably a winner with this. A good story. I lived through all these decades and it was pretty emotional to watch, actually, as I knew some freedom riders and some guys who got killed in Vietnam.

The one criticism I have is that the guy who played Eisenhower didn't look like Eisenhower; the guy who played Nixon looked nothing like Nixon; the guy who played LBJ and the guy who played Kennedy looked very little like their characters. The guy who played Reagan looked a teeny bit like Reagan. I mean, this is Hollywood. Saturday Night Live characters look more real.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
Mr. Brooks

Interesting coming back to this one. It still stays with me as much as it did the 1st time I watched it. One of the few times I can say "great acting by Kevin Costner." William Hurt is great as well.


Totally agree. I wasn't going to see it based on Costner but someone insisted understanding my plight. Good call.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Manhattan

Someone once told me you either love Woody or hate him.


You hangout with well informed people. Smile

Woody still writes and directs movies for adults, which is why his films do so well in Europe. Too long ago America stopped such with few exceptions. Frown

While I understand people that do not enjoy Woody ( KCS02, Rob and others) I like the majority of film enthusiast adore his work.
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Cloud Atlas.

Anyone else see this and what do you think? Was delayed getting back home from O'Hare last night so had nothing but time to kill. And, believe me, this movie killed time.

Friend of mine loves it and watched it 3 times. Not sure if he's crazy or if I missed something prophetic here!


We watched it on DVD awhile ago and my memory was that I was doing other things at the same time. It seemed like a big time commitment that did not grab me and as a result did not hold my attention. (Maybe if I had read the book first before I saw the film?) It was also brought to the screen by the pair that did the Matrix trilogy and it had that the same pretension of intellectual "weight".
It was also brought to the screen by the pair that did the Matrix trilogy and it had that the same pretension of intellectual "weight".[/QUOTE]

That makes a lot of sense. I've heard good things about the book, so I'm going to read that and then decide if the movie is worth another go . . . but I think I've already made that decision!
Flight -- good but not as good as I had hoped

OZ The Great and Powerful -- Nothing great about it. I think if they had put the witches in bikinis, they might have had something here.

The Last Lions -- I admit it, I'm a sucker for nature documentaries -- and this was a pretty good one. I do always wonder with watching these how much manipulation the filmmakers do to get a good "story."
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
Ruby Sparks - a film in the tradition of Pygmalion, Delirious and Stranger than Fiction. Enjoyable romantic comedy with predictable ending. Great cameo performances. The actress, Zoe Kazan, was also the writer.

Yes. And she's his granddaughter.


I was going to mention it but I didn't want to show my age :0
Gravity

For the uninitiated, a perfunctory glance suggests this is the most well reviewed major English language film in over a decade. On Rottentomatoes, it is sitting at 98% Fresh amongst all critics and 100% Fresh amongst "top critics". Buzz includes comments such as those from James Cameron that this is "the greatest movie ever set in space" and "the movie [he] has been waiting [his] whole life to see." The movies is written, directed, and produced by Alfonso Cuarón who has made several extrodinary movies, amongst them Y Tú Mama Tambien and Children of Men.

First of all, I loved it. But secondly, this is a nearly impossible movie to review. Immediately, this is the most extraordinarily well filmed movie set in space of all time. And, frankly, space or no, it is flat out one of the most expertly and wonderfully filmed movies in the history of cinema.

What makes the movie so unlike any other movie, though, is for all the technical and photographic brilliance, the movie is essentially a play. Perhaps even a minimalist play. The entire never-bested production is to provide the backdrop for a very human and in some ways very small and quiet movie -- but a movie full of emotion and 88 minutes of thrill and excitement (The entire movie is 91 minutes long).

George Clooney is great, and Sandra Bullock gives the best performance of her career. And I felt feelings... even though I've never been in their position, it really resonated with me -- how would I handle it? How could I find the ability to go on? The movie is about the triumph of the human spirit and, perhaps because my mother just passed away a couple of weeks ago, I could not help but be reminded of the very human struggles my family has recently gone through as watching this.

All of this said, I was consistently taken out of being truly and fully immersed -- for the strangest of reasons. The scope and quality of the photography, staging, and production was so extraordinary that I was often aware of the juxtaposition of this production for what, as I said, is essentially a very human, small, play. Cuarón is such a brilliant director, everything on the screen is alive and moving -- thought has gone into the pen or paperclip in the upper right hand corner of the screen that any other director would have paid no attention to. But it is almost as if he is *too good* for this. It is almost like Schindler's List direction of Waiting for Godot.

This is a movie that absolutely MUST be seen in 3D on a huge screen. The flip side of what I've been saying is that in order to get the requisite thrill and impact of this movie, such production values were absolutely essential. It adds tremendously. Plus, just as a movie buff, this is going to be (already is being) called one of the greatest technical achievements in movie history -- and even if just for that (even though there is so much more to seeing it on a huge screen in 3D) -- it is a 'must see' in 3D on the largest screen in your area for any movie lover.

I'm coming in lower than the vast majority of critics on this and scoring it an enthusiastic: A-
Last edited by winetarelli
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Gravity

For the uninitiated, a perfunctory glance suggests this is the most well reviewed major English language film in over a decade. On Rottentomatoes, it is sitting at 98% Fresh amongst all critics and 100% Fresh amongst "top critics". Buzz includes comments such as those from James Cameron that this is "the greatest movie ever set in space" and "the movie [he] has been waiting [his] whole life to see." The movies is written, directed, and produced by Afonso Cuarón who has made several extrodinary movies, amongst them Y Tú Mama Tambien and Children of Men.

First of all, I loved it. But secondly, this is a nearly impossible movie to review. Immediately, this is the most extraordinarily well filmed movie set in space of all time. And, frankly, space or no, it is flat out one of the most expertly and wonderfully filmed movies in the history of cinema.

What makes the movie so unlike any other movie, though, is for all the technical and photographic brilliance, the movie is essentially a play. Perhaps even a minimalist play. The entire never-bested production is to provide the backdrop for a very human and in some ways very small and quiet movie -- but a movie full of emotion and 88 minutes of thrill and excitement (The entire movie is 91 minutes long).

George Clooney is great, and Sandra Bullock gives the best performance of her career. And I felt feelings... even though I've never been in their position, it really resonated with me -- how would I handle it? How could I find the ability to go on? The movie is about the triumph of the human spirit and, perhaps because my mother just passed away a couple of weeks ago, I could not help but be reminded of the very human struggles my family has recently gone through as watching this.

All of this said, I was consistently taken out of being truly and fully immersed -- for the strangest of reasons. The scope and quality of the photography, staging, and production was so extraordinary that I was often aware of the juxtaposition of this production for what, as I said, is essentially a very human, small, play. Cuarón is such a brilliant director, everything on the screen is alive and moving -- thought has gone into the pen or paperclip in the upper right hand corner of the screen that any other director would have paid no attention to. But it is almost as if he is *too good* for this. It is almost like Schindler's List direction of Waiting for Godot.

This is a movie that absolutely MUST be seen in 3D on a huge screen. The flip side of what I've been saying is that in order to get the requisite thrill and impact of this movie, such production values were absolutely essential. It adds tremendously. Plus, just as a movie buff, this is going to be (already is being) called one of the greatest technical achievements in movie history -- and even if just for that (even though there is so much more to seeing it on a huge screen in 3D) -- it is a 'must see' in 3D on the largest screen in your area for any movie lover.

I'm coming in lower than the vast majority of critics on this and scoring it an enthusiastic: A-


Wow . . great review! Hoping to see this within the next week
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Gravity

For the uninitiated, a perfunctory glance suggests this is the most well reviewed major English language film in over a decade. On Rottentomatoes, it is sitting at 98% Fresh amongst all critics and 100% Fresh amongst "top critics". Buzz includes comments such as those from James Cameron that this is "the greatest movie ever set in space" and "the movie [he] has been waiting [his] whole life to see." The movies is written, directed, and produced by Afonso Cuarón who has made several extrodinary movies, amongst them Y Tú Mama Tambien and Children of Men.

First of all, I loved it. But secondly, this is a nearly impossible movie to review. Immediately, this is the most extraordinarily well filmed movie set in space of all time. And, frankly, space or no, it is flat out one of the most expertly and wonderfully filmed movies in the history of cinema.

What makes the movie so unlike any other movie, though, is for all the technical and photographic brilliance, the movie is essentially a play. Perhaps even a minimalist play. The entire never-bested production is to provide the backdrop for a very human and in some ways very small and quiet movie -- but a movie full of emotion and 88 minutes of thrill and excitement (The entire movie is 91 minutes long).

George Clooney is great, and Sandra Bullock gives the best performance of her career. And I felt feelings... even though I've never been in their position, it really resonated with me -- how would I handle it? How could I find the ability to go on? The movie is about the triumph of the human spirit and, perhaps because my mother just passed away a couple of weeks ago, I could not help but be reminded of the very human struggles my family has recently gone through as watching this.

All of this said, I was consistently taken out of being truly and fully immersed -- for the strangest of reasons. The scope and quality of the photography, staging, and production was so extraordinary that I was often aware of the juxtaposition of this production for what, as I said, is essentially a very human, small, play. Cuarón is such a brilliant director, everything on the screen is alive and moving -- thought has gone into the pen or paperclip in the upper right hand corner of the screen that any other director would have paid no attention to. But it is almost as if he is *too good* for this. It is almost like Schindler's List direction of Waiting for Godot.

This is a movie that absolutely MUST be seen in 3D on a huge screen. The flip side of what I've been saying is that in order to get the requisite thrill and impact of this movie, such production values were absolutely essential. It adds tremendously. Plus, just as a movie buff, this is going to be (already is being) called one of the greatest technical achievements in movie history -- and even if just for that (even though there is so much more to seeing it on a huge screen in 3D) -- it is a 'must see' in 3D on the largest screen in your area for any movie lover.

I'm coming in lower than the vast majority of critics on this and scoring it an enthusiastic: A-


Great review... thank you, winetarelli. I am very sorry to hear of your mother's passing, however... my thoughts & prayers are with you.
Amour, 20 minutes--click. I think there's just a lot of bad filmmaking here. I don't understand the too long static shot of the audience preparing to watch the piano concerto. I don't get the husband who, regardless of how old he is, does't get on the horn to the amubulence when his wife's obviously stroking out. And then we spend another 7 minutes before he finally says, "I should call the doctor." Followed with another poorly framed and weirdly static shot of him talking to his daughter ceaselessly.

PS, 16 minutes was all we could take of the aimless Side Effect. When we got to the Repulsion moment, that we all knew was coming, that was it. I guess it goes on to be clever, but I thought even the music was bad.
[QUOTE]Originally posted by The Old Man:
Amour, 20 minutes--click. I think there's just a lot of bad filmmaking here. I don't understand the too long static shot of the audience preparing to watch the piano concerto. I don't get the husband who, regardless of how old he is, does't get on the horn to the amubulence when his wife's obviously stroking out. And then we spend another 7 minutes before he finally says, "I should call the doctor." Followed with another poorly framed and weirdly static shot of him talking to his daughter ceaselessly.

The end of life is not perfect.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Gravity

For the uninitiated, a perfunctory glance suggests this is the most well reviewed major English language film in over a decade. On Rottentomatoes, it is sitting at 98% Fresh amongst all critics and 100% Fresh amongst "top critics". Buzz includes comments such as those from James Cameron that this is "the greatest movie ever set in space" and "the movie [he] has been waiting [his] whole life to see." The movies is written, directed, and produced by Alfonso Cuarón who has made several extrodinary movies, amongst them Y Tú Mama Tambien and Children of Men.

First of all, I loved it. But secondly, this is a nearly impossible movie to review. Immediately, this is the most extraordinarily well filmed movie set in space of all time. And, frankly, space or no, it is flat out one of the most expertly and wonderfully filmed movies in the history of cinema.

What makes the movie so unlike any other movie, though, is for all the technical and photographic brilliance, the movie is essentially a play. Perhaps even a minimalist play. The entire never-bested production is to provide the backdrop for a very human and in some ways very small and quiet movie -- but a movie full of emotion and 88 minutes of thrill and excitement (The entire movie is 91 minutes long).

George Clooney is great, and Sandra Bullock gives the best performance of her career. And I felt feelings... even though I've never been in their position, it really resonated with me -- how would I handle it? How could I find the ability to go on? The movie is about the triumph of the human spirit and, perhaps because my mother just passed away a couple of weeks ago, I could not help but be reminded of the very human struggles my family has recently gone through as watching this.

All of this said, I was consistently taken out of being truly and fully immersed -- for the strangest of reasons. The scope and quality of the photography, staging, and production was so extraordinary that I was often aware of the juxtaposition of this production for what, as I said, is essentially a very human, small, play. Cuarón is such a brilliant director, everything on the screen is alive and moving -- thought has gone into the pen or paperclip in the upper right hand corner of the screen that any other director would have paid no attention to. But it is almost as if he is *too good* for this. It is almost like Schindler's List direction of Waiting for Godot.

This is a movie that absolutely MUST be seen in 3D on a huge screen. The flip side of what I've been saying is that in order to get the requisite thrill and impact of this movie, such production values were absolutely essential. It adds tremendously. Plus, just as a movie buff, this is going to be (already is being) called one of the greatest technical achievements in movie history -- and even if just for that (even though there is so much more to seeing it on a huge screen in 3D) -- it is a 'must see' in 3D on the largest screen in your area for any movie lover.

I'm coming in lower than the vast majority of critics on this and scoring it an enthusiastic: A-


I am sorry about your mother. Please accept my condolences.

Thank you for the review. I have heard nothing but praise for this movie, but I was wondering whether to see it on IMAX in 3D or not.

Now I have my answer.
quote:
Originally posted by Juicy:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by The Old Man:
Amour, 20 minutes--click. I think there's just a lot of bad filmmaking here. I don't understand the too long static shot of the audience preparing to watch the piano concerto. I don't get the husband who, regardless of how old he is, does't get on the horn to the amubulence when his wife's obviously stroking out. And then we spend another 7 minutes before he finally says, "I should call the doctor." Followed with another poorly framed and weirdly static shot of him talking to his daughter ceaselessly.

The end of life is not perfect.

Most of my critism had nothing to do with the end of life. It's unrealistic dislogue and unnecessary shots.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Amour, 20 minutes--click. I think there's just a lot of bad filmmaking here. I don't understand the too long static shot of the audience preparing to watch the piano concerto. I don't get the husband who, regardless of how old he is, does't get on the horn to the amubulence when his wife's obviously stroking out. And then we spend another 7 minutes before he finally says, "I should call the doctor." Followed with another poorly framed and weirdly static shot of him talking to his daughter ceaselessly.



I'm not sure what my review would have been if I only watched for 20 minutes, but watching the entire movie I agree with the endless praise of this excellent movie. I also agree with this movie being one of the very finest of 2012.

On a side note, I thought Ebert's review was not only spot on, but thought his last paragraph on this movie was Ebert at his finest.

I will miss his reviews.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:I'm not sure what my review would have been if I only watched for 20 minutes, but watching the entire movie I agree with the endless praise of this excellent movie. I also agree with this movie being one of the very finest of 2012.

20 minutes is over 15% of the movie. There was so much bad filmmaking up to that point that I didn't see how it could improve. Could someone address the too long static shot in the auditorium or the purpose of the too long, and poorly framed, static shot of the scene with his daughter?
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Juicy:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by The Old Man:
Amour, 20 minutes--click. I think there's just a lot of bad filmmaking here. I don't understand the too long static shot of the audience preparing to watch the piano concerto. I don't get the husband who, regardless of how old he is, does't get on the horn to the amubulence when his wife's obviously stroking out. And then we spend another 7 minutes before he finally says, "I should call the doctor." Followed with another poorly framed and weirdly static shot of him talking to his daughter ceaselessly.

The end of life is not perfect.

Most of my critism had nothing to do with the end of life. It's unrealistic dislogue and unnecessary shots.


Personally I just have a hard time watching angst, hardship, heartbreak and sorrow for hours on end. Especially if it is well done.

Spending money and time to intentionally feel terrible is usually not high on my list no matter how beautiful the wallow may be.
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
Master and Commander was on IFC last night and I watched most of it again.

Has anyone read the books? Are they good?

The books are very difficult. They are full of colloquialisms and 19th century sailing terminology. There is a concordance available to help, but I only made it through the first three and a half books. However, they are extremely high rated and recommended to your mileage may vary.

I actually got a model of the HMS Surprise to help me immerse myself into the era. Available here:
Handcrafted Model Ships
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Late night travel last night made easier with some old John Cusack classics:

Better off Dead
Grosse Pointe Blank


I think the only "classics" that he was in are The Grifters and Being John Malcavitch. I'd throw The Sure Thing in there for fun. The Grifters is also the only good movie Annette Benning was in.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Late night travel last night made easier with some old John Cusack classics:

Better off Dead
Grosse Pointe Blank


I think the only "classics" that he was in are The Grifters and Being John Malcavitch. I'd throw The Sure Thing in there for fun.


I won't argue about Better off Dead, but Grosse Pointe Blank was an excellent movie and had one of my favorite soundtracks.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Late night travel last night made easier with some old John Cusack classics:

Better off Dead
Grosse Pointe Blank


I think the only "classics" that he was in are The Grifters and Being John Malcavitch. I'd throw The Sure Thing in there for fun.


I won't argue about Better off Dead, but Grosse Pointe Blank was an excellent movie and had one of my favorite soundtracks.


For shame, Better of Dead is remarkable and fantastic. I want my two dollars. Two dollars. As an aside, the actor who played the villain from Better Off Dead was an excellent waiter in Key West for a number of years.

Oh and Grosse Point Blank is awesome
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Late night travel last night made easier with some old John Cusack classics:

Better off Dead
Grosse Pointe Blank


I think the only "classics" that he was in are The Grifters and Being John Malcavitch. I'd throw The Sure Thing in there for fun.


I won't argue about Better off Dead, but Grosse Pointe Blank was an excellent movie and had one of my favorite soundtracks.


For shame, Better of Dead is remarkable and fantastic. I want my two dollars. Two dollars. As an aside, the actor who played the villain from Better Off Dead was an excellent waiter in Key West for a number of years.

Oh and Grosse Point Blank is awesome


all mentioned are great John Cusack flicks. Totally forgot about the Sure Thing though . . . that is definitely up there.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
I can watch anything that has Minnie Driver in it...


Interesting, I'm just the opposite, cannot watch anything she is in.


I just don't know what the heck happens with her accent from film to film. I think she's a decent actress, thought she was really attractive in her earlier movies, and now think she's an ok actress with really poor speech coaches! Favorite flick with her though in my mind is "Good Will Hunting" but see note above about wacky accent
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
I can watch anything that has Minnie Driver in it...


She's quite a good singer and songwriter, too. Her album from about 5 years ago, Seastories, was on regular rotation in our house when it was first released.


I read a pretty funny quote by her. When she was 18 or so, she moved to Rio de Janeiro. She said (to paraphrase) "it amazing how long you can go with no money on just a bikini." She lived there for something like 2 years Smile
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Purge . . .

disturbing premise, fairly predictable, but not bad for a quick flight. Haven't seen Ethan Hawke in a flick for a while and his performance was a tad stiff but again passable for an in-flight movie to pass the time

Think I've seen this before. Isn't everything run by a giant computer named, "Landru"?


Oldie but goodie episode with Landru!
Somm - on the recommendation of vinojoe. The second of 3 wine docs I would like to see this fall. Red Obsession was the first. Both were about obsession, but I could relate to the motivations in Somm more so than in RH.

The third film I'd like to see is A Year in Burgundy. Anyone seen it yet?