Skip to main content

quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Shakespeare in Love

Stoppard's ability to add to the canon of Shakespeare is beyond remarkable. Obviously, Rosencratz and Guildenstern are Dead did not translate well into a movie. But every time I come back to one of these works after a long period of time, I'm still shocked how wonderfully he was able to meld his world with that of Shakespeare's.

Gwyneth at her best, too.


x2
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Shakespeare in Love

Stoppard's ability to add to the canon of Shakespeare is beyond remarkable. Obviously, Rosencratz and Guildenstern are Dead did not translate well into a movie. But every time I come back to one of these works after a long period of time, I'm still shocked how wonderfully he was able to meld his world with that of Shakespeare's.

Gwyneth at her best, too.


x2


X3
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


Whether you liked the movie itself or not, any man who didn't cry toward the end of Marley & Me just doesn't have a soul...


+1. I simply lost it at the end of that movie.
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


I never seen Hachi, don't remember crying with Rudy, and it's been a long time since I've seen Field of Dreams. The movie that slways chokes me up at the ending is It's a Wonderful Life.


Ditto Hachi.
My Life as a Dog
Courage of Lassie (Lassie is a decorated WWII vet with PTSD, although they didn't call it that back then)
Fluke
Dean Spanley

I've a soft spot for dog movies
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


I never seen Hachi, don't remember crying with Rudy, and it's been a long time since I've seen Field of Dreams. The movie that slways chokes me up at the ending is It's a Wonderful Life.


Ditto Hachi.
My Life as a Dog
Courage of Lassie (Lassie is a decorated WWII vet with PTSD, although they didn't call it that back then)
Fluke
Dean Spanley

I've a soft spot for dog movies

Oh, lord, any of those. How about My Dog Skip, or any of the Lassie movies or TV series.
I can remember watching Lassie as a small child, when at the end of every show, she and the park ranger who was searching for her would miss each other by only a few seconds, and I would be crying, "No, Lassie! Turn around! Go the other way!"

For the original tear jerker, there is, of course, Ol' Yeller.
As Phoebe on Friends once exclaimed, "What kind of sick, doggy snuff film is this?!?"
Pacific Rim

The best possible monsters vs. robots movie imaginable. Also, it is a monsters vs. robots movie.

Or, as one reviewer put it: "This is THE robots vs. monsters movie you wanted Guillermo del Toro to make... if you wanted him to make a robots vs. monsters movie"

Film fan boys should see it. It certainly appeals to the 14 year old boy in one. It is creative (within the context) and it is a lesson in how to make a movie like this. eg. All of the fighting sequences make sense -- you always know where each robot is, where each monster is, where they are in relation to one another, what has just happened, etc. It isn't like the other crap where things just go flying and appear out of nowhere and disappear inexplicably, etc. In certain regards, while I don't think it is quite as good, it evokes Spielberg's Jurassic Park in that sense; within its own self-contained world, what is going on makes sense and is consistent.

Most fanboy-ish, of course, is that Guillermo del Toro directed (and co-wrote... in this case I think meaning lots of script doctoring) it. Since Pan's Labyrinth he has been just about the most sought after director in the industry. (BTW: If you haven't seen Pan's Labyrinth put that next in your queue... just a freakishly creative, wonderful and compelling movie.) And his artistic and creative vision is already legendary. (2015/2016 cannot arrive fast enough for me to see his dark, gothic, "definitive" live action re-telling of Beauty and the Beast.)

Overall, I would give the movie a flat B, but with the proviso that it is interesting, creative, and well executed enough that I would encourage people to see it. Try to see it in Imax, but regular 2D is great, too. (Apparently, it is too dark in regular 3D.) B
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Pacific Rim

The best possible monsters vs. robots movie imaginable. Also, it is a monsters vs. robots movie.

Or, as one reviewer put it: "This is THE robots vs. monsters movie you wanted Guillermo del Toro to make... if you wanted him to make a robots vs. monsters movie"

Film fan boys should see it. It certainly appeals to the 14 year old boy in one. It is creative (within the context) and it is a lesson in how to make a movie like this. eg. All of the fighting sequences make sense -- you always know where each robot is, where each monster is, where they are in relation to one another, what has just happened, etc. It isn't like the other crap where things just go flying and appear out of nowhere and disappear inexplicably, etc. In certain regards, while I don't think it is quite as good, it evokes Spielberg's Jurassic Park in that sense; within its own self-contained world, what is going on makes sense and is consistent.

Most fanboy-ish, of course, is that Guillermo del Toro directed (and co-wrote... in this case I think meaning lots of script doctoring) it. Since Pan's Labyrinth he has been just about the most sought after director in the industry. (BTW: If you haven't seen Pan's Labyrinth put that next in your queue... just a freakishly creative, wonderful and compelling movie.) And his artistic and creative vision is already legendary. (2015/2016 cannot arrive fast enough for me to see his dark, gothic, "definitive" live action re-telling of Beauty and the Beast.)

Overall, I would give the movie a flat B, but with the proviso that it is interesting, creative, and well executed enough that I would encourage people to see it. Try to see it in Imax, but regular 2D is great, too. (Apparently, it is too dark in regular 3D.) B

Just a couple of corrections: You can't be a co-writer and script doctor--you never will see the name of a script doctor on the screen.

While I am a big del Toro fan he could never be called, "just about the most sought after director in the industry." He's never had a big hit and his films are too eclectic.

I think this is pretty well summed up at Box Office Mojo
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


Whether you liked the movie itself or not, any man who didn't cry toward the end of Marley & Me just doesn't have a soul...


Haven't seen it but if it something to do with a dog dying, I wouldn't cry. No affinity towards pets. Hate going to 'dog people's houses. I always end up needing to change my clothes.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Pacific Rim

The best possible monsters vs. robots movie imaginable. Also, it is a monsters vs. robots movie.

Or, as one reviewer put it: "This is THE robots vs. monsters movie you wanted Guillermo del Toro to make... if you wanted him to make a robots vs. monsters movie"

Film fan boys should see it. It certainly appeals to the 14 year old boy in one. It is creative (within the context) and it is a lesson in how to make a movie like this. eg. All of the fighting sequences make sense -- you always know where each robot is, where each monster is, where they are in relation to one another, what has just happened, etc. It isn't like the other crap where things just go flying and appear out of nowhere and disappear inexplicably, etc. In certain regards, while I don't think it is quite as good, it evokes Spielberg's Jurassic Park in that sense; within its own self-contained world, what is going on makes sense and is consistent.

Most fanboy-ish, of course, is that Guillermo del Toro directed (and co-wrote... in this case I think meaning lots of script doctoring) it. Since Pan's Labyrinth he has been just about the most sought after director in the industry. (BTW: If you haven't seen Pan's Labyrinth put that next in your queue... just a freakishly creative, wonderful and compelling movie.) And his artistic and creative vision is already legendary. (2015/2016 cannot arrive fast enough for me to see his dark, gothic, "definitive" live action re-telling of Beauty and the Beast.)

Overall, I would give the movie a flat B, but with the proviso that it is interesting, creative, and well executed enough that I would encourage people to see it. Try to see it in Imax, but regular 2D is great, too. (Apparently, it is too dark in regular 3D.) B

Just a couple of corrections: You can't be a co-writer and script doctor--you never will see the name of a script doctor on the screen.

While I am a big del Toro fan he could never be called, "just about the most sought after director in the industry." He's never had a big hit and his films are too eclectic.

I think this is pretty well summed up at Box Office Mojo


I know nothing is ever quick in the movie industry, so maybe it is just that all del Toro's movies are in post production, holding patterns, etc., but from what I could find this is only the second release since Pan's Labyrinth that he's directed -- the other coming out in 2008. He has plenty of producer credits, so is he the "most sought out director in the business" who just doesn't accept jobs?
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Don't take this too personally, but if someone doesn't like dogs (in general), I wonder about them...
I’m kind of the same way as Adam10 (never thought I would say that!). It’s not that I don’t like dogs, I think puppy’s are cute and all that, but I just have never had any real feelings for dogs or any other pets like others do. My mom loves to tell this story. I was like 10 years old and my parents surprised me with a dog. They put me in the backyard with the dog and a ball and I threw the ball a few times and the dog chased after it. After about 5 mins of that I picked up my ball and start walking over to my neighbors house and my mom and dad yell “where are you going”? I turned and simply said “I’m going to play with Billy, when I throw the ball with him he can catch it and throw it back”. That pretty much sums how I have always felt about pets. Does that say something about me? I don’t know, but it is what it is. If our little girl wants a pet she will have to play with her grandparent’s dog!

I should add that it’s not like I don’t care about animals. For instance, I could never go hunting. You couldn’t pay me to shoot an animal and take its life. It would just crush me. The only way I could potentially do it is if I knew we were going to use all the meat and even then I’m not sure I could pull the trigger.
quote:
While I am a big del Toro fan he could never be called, "just about the most sought after director in the industry." He's never had a big hit and his films are too eclectic.


The reason I put it like that was he was tapped to direct The Hobbit and spent years of his life working on it, then bowed out. This. Crimson Peak and Beauty and the Beast both of which WB is rumored to be paying huge sums of money for and giving del Toro final cut (likely 'R' rating).

When a studio has a director-less moderately-big to very-big budget project, that they want to be good, especially roughly related to the fantasy genre, I cannot think of another director they go to first right now.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
City Lights, ( Chaplin)


Great movie. Took a film class freshman year of college titled something like Comedy in Film. The first third of the course we watched silent films -- Chaplin, Keaton, Harold Lloyd. In addition to watching some classic films by/with great comedians, I credit watching and enjoying those silent classics with changing me from someone who didn't like subtitled foreign films to someone who does. Might have also just been my maturation process, but I really believe watching those silent films were a big part of it.
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


Whether you liked the movie itself or not, any man who didn't cry toward the end of Marley & Me just doesn't have a soul...


+1. I simply lost it at the end of that movie.


I refuse to watch the movie becuase I know I would do the same.

I'd add Braveheart to the list.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Don't take this too personally, but if someone doesn't like dogs (in general), I wonder about them...


Ha...don't know what that means but ok. I don't get it. What void to they fill? Makes me wonder about those people! They're an unnecessary pain to me. Barking drives me bananas! Slobbering, hair, sh*te, etc. Zero animal guy. I always neglect to mention it on first dates though!

Once I went to my friend's place to go to a club, wearing off-white pants. His dog jumped up at me, mud all down my pants. Could have shot the thing (not really...maybe). Had to have a conversation with his parents in their living room in my underwear whilst my pants were being washed. Class.

As for hunting...I think it'd be hypocritical of me not to shoot an animal but happily order a venison steak at a resto.

Am fascinated with the Animal Kingdom though, in a DVD kind of hands-off way.

Anyway, back to films....I saw Man Of Steel. Very popcorn.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
Over the last week

The Sessions


The Sessions was outstanding.


I thought so as well. I need to watch it again to reconfirm.


I've only seen maybe half of the films that were up for best picture last year, but I'd put both Silver Linings Playbook and The Sessions ahead of Argo -- with SLP the best. I thought John Hawkes was excellent as was William H. Macy. Helen Hunt was very good, and I really thught the actress that played Vera (Moon somebody) was good too.
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
Jack Reacher - surprising dull for an action / crime film.


Loved most of the Reacher books. Hated this movie. Horrible casting decision for Reacher. Tom Cruise?? Confused

PH


My wife picked the film as she also enjoyed the books. Seeing it cold with no background info, I thought it was like watching a lightbulb: on = action, off = dull acting go back to reading email...
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
Jack Reacher - surprising dull for an action / crime film.


Loved most of the Reacher books. Hated this movie. Horrible casting decision for Reacher. Tom Cruise?? Confused

PH

I heard he bought the rights and cast himself, which sounds about right but I don't have any proof of that. Either way, no interest... Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
Jack Reacher - surprising dull for an action / crime film.


Loved most of the Reacher books. Hated this movie. Horrible casting decision for Reacher. Tom Cruise?? Confused

PH


Books are excellent, but I refuse to see the movie with Cruise. Thank you for confirming my decision. Cruise as a character that is 6'5", 250 lbs? Please....
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by mpls wine guy:
New Star Trek Movie.


Okay, I'm going to say it. I have never seen any Star Trek movie. Eek

Eek KKKKKKKKKKhhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaannnnnnnn! Eek

BTW, finally watched The Sound of My Voice. How interesting is Brit Marling and who wouldn't want her for a girlfriend? Is the movie perfect, no--but I'll take someone trying something interesting instead of Fast and Furious 24 any day!
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by mpls wine guy:
New Star Trek Movie.


Okay, I'm going to say it. I have never seen any Star Trek movie. Eek
Me neither. Same for Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings and Star Wars. To be fair, I'm not a big movie fan and probably only watch 2-4 movies a year.


Pet peeve. Wink

Anyway... I saw one Star Trek movie when I was like, 7, at a birthday party. Haven't seen the new ones, though I hear they are good. As far as you not having seen Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings is concerned... wow Eek

I've always felt that Star Wars is more interesting from a genre-creation perspective than it is actually a good series. And the recent ones are crap.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by mpls wine guy:
New Star Trek Movie.


Okay, I'm going to say it. I have never seen any Star Trek movie. Eek
Me neither. Same for Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings and Star Wars. To be fair, I'm not a big movie fan and probably only watch 2-4 movies a year.


Pet peeve. Wink

Anyway... I saw one Star Trek movie when I was like, 7, at a birthday party. Haven't seen the new ones, though I hear they are good. As far as you not having seen Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings is concerned... wow Eek

I've always felt that Star Wars is more interesting from a genre-creation perspective than it is actually a good series. And the recent ones are crap.
I'm not big on wizards and stuff like that, plus I just don't watch a lot of movies as I said. I have a hard time sitting still for 2 hours is really what it is. I would rather be doing something or if its late I would rather read. Most of the movies I watch are by accident.
quote:
Originally posted by xhoser:
My wife is a big horror fan so took her to The Conjuring. It was actually better than I expected, although my expectations around horror movies has dropped dramatically over the years.


My expectations for horror movies have declined as well, but my wife and I caught the Conjuring this weekend and both were pleasantly surprised.

To me, it was more creepy than scary. But, I liked the way the (not to spoil it for anyone) *thing* wasn't always present and, when it was, it was slowly brought into frame...

One of the better 'scary' movies I've seen in a while...
You know, I like to keep an open mind, but the only horror movie (as opposed to thrillers) I've ever enjoyed was the original The Evil Dead. And I enjoy that mostly for the camp.

Meanwhile, wine+art,
quote:
Belle de Jour

You realize, this is at least the 5th time you've watched this movie in just over a year. (Not that there is anything wrong with that Smile )
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
The Road

I had watched 3/4 of the movie before, but not the ending, so I was finally able to see the entire film.


Curious as to what you thought of the ending. Happy or are they going to chow down on the kid? I'm in the latter camp.


I don't know. It's a bit ambiguous.

SPOILER ALERT


On the one hand, the fact that the family had kids and a dog (were they the ones following them throughout the movie? There was a scene where the Boy spotted another boy, and a scene were the Man said he heard a dog) would seem to bode well. And that the new guy didn't just ambush and shoot him. If they had wanted to eat him, there was no reason to approach him, risk being shot, and then introducing him to the family. If you are going to eat a rabbit, for example, you don't let the kids play with it and give it a name.

On the other hand, I got a weird vibe from the new guy and his "wife". Their dialogue seemed... strained.

I would like to think that the ending was supposed to be positive, just like the fact that they saw a living beetle that flew up into the sky. The rest of the movie was so depressing (albeit realistic, I thought).
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I would like to think that the ending was supposed to be positive,


Cormac McCarthy, positive? LOL

They followed them waiting for the father to die and swoop in on the defenseless kid. I agree that final scene did have a weird vibe, which is why I think the kid was lunch meat. They had that Wiley E Coyote look about them.

Not sure if you have read the book, but its ending is not so ambiguous. I think the film makers wanted to put this twist on the ending.
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

Everything you could possibly, realistically, want a movie with such a title to be. Ridiculous on a metaphysical level. If 'high art' is located over *here*, then this movie is located on the other side of the big bang. There is a period of about 15-20 minutes extending from about 55% through the movie to about 70% through the movie that gets a bit slow. Other than that, it is quite entertaining. Of course, I am dumber for having watched this. Much dumber. And there is no possible way to assign a rating to a movie like this.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by xhoser:

although my expectations around horror movies has dropped dramatically over the years.


X, what horror movies do you like?


W+A,

Psycho and The Birds by Hitchcock are classics. I also enjoyed The Shining many years ago. I like thrillers more than horror. My wife likes scary movies so doesn't necessarily need to be in the horror category. However, most of the stuff we have watched over the last number of years has been total crap. The last recent movie that stands out as memorable was The Sixth Sense but that was over a decade ago.
quote:
Originally posted by xhoser: My wife likes scary movies so doesn't necessarily need to be in the horror category. However, most of the stuff we have watched over the last number of years has been total crap. The last recent movie that stands out as memorable was The Sixth Sense but that was over a decade ago.

El Orfanato
Not a movie, but American Horror Story is excellent and will make you squirm. The opening credits alone can make you run from the room.
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Anyone seen the Fruitvale Station yet?

TIA.


No. Too close to home to watch. Big Grin

Gangster Squad - good looking and stylish, but dull and lifeless. A poor cousin in the family of LA Confidential and Mullholland Falls. The DMN has a films to avoid each week article, and this film made the list.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:


One of the few films I can really enjoy more than once.


Interesting, bman.

I'm just the opposite for some reason. I revisit all art forms ( art, sculpture, music, books, architecture, gardens, et al.) often including movies. There is just something about knowing I will greatly enjoy my time spent when the mood strikes. I also love finding nuance/seeing/ or hearing a new discovery in an art form I have missed many times before.

When sitting on an airplane for endless hours, I much prefer revisiting past loves. ( music, movies, books)

I hope our paths cross soon. I would love to share wine and contemplate the vicissitudes of life together.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:


One of the few films I can really enjoy more than once.


Interesting, bman.

I'm just the opposite for some reason. I revisit all art forms ( art, sculpture, music, books, architecture, gardens, et al.) often including movies. There is just something about knowing I will greatly enjoy my time spent when the mood strikes. I also love finding nuance/seeing/ or hearing a new discovery in an art form I have missed many times before.

When sitting on an airplane for endless hours, I much prefer revisiting past loves. ( music, movies, books)

I hope our paths cross soon. I would love to share wine and contemplate the vicissitudes of life together.


My attention span is notoriously short, so knowing what is coming diminishes the enjoyment of films already seen, for most films at least. Ditto books. But not the other art forms you mention.

And I too look forward to offlining with you one day. We are well and truly due! Smile
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:I'm just the opposite for some reason.


Because great art demands it and deserves it. How could I not watch Chinatown for the 10th time,


Only 10? Razz Wink

I was lowballing so I didn't seem too compulsive.


Big Grin ... well, as an obsessive compulsive and hyper fastidious person myself, I understand. Wink
For serious. Smile


I'm in between when it comes to movie watching. I can (and do) watch many movies (eg. A Room With a View) over and over again. Other movies I like to watch often, but they would lose something to me if watched too frequently. The Godfather is my favorite movie ever, but I cannot watch it more than twice or three times a year or it would become a bit stale. Then, there are movies like Schindler's List where once every ten years is plenty, despite extraordinary greatness.

Last night: Warm Bodies.
Cute. Sweet. Incredible that this movie (plot) had not been made before and a very good job for the first try. Still, I couldn't help but think in the hands of Alfonso Cuarón (or, perhaps Guillermo del Toro or Wes Anderson) it could have been so much more. Still a solid recommendation for a good stay-home-and-take-it-easy type movie. B
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
True Grit (2010)
A movie that, somehow, I had never seen. Loved it. A western for people who don't like westerns. (Like me.) Strong reccomendation as a 'serious' popcorn movie. A-/A


I have the DVD at home from Netflix, but have not gotten around to watching it yet. Now that I read your post, I think I'll pop it into the DVD player tonight.
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Anyone seen the Fruitvale Station yet?

TIA.


No. Too close to home to watch.

Gangster Squad - good looking and stylish, but dull and lifeless. A poor cousin in the family of LA Confidential and Mullholland Falls. Seemed more like the Warren Beatty film Dick Tracy.


Wish I had seen this report on Gangster Squad earlier. Just got it delivered from Netflix. Oh well.
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
A Late Quartet

Catherine Keener, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Christopher (Cowbell) Walken. What could go wrong?


I tried watching this on the plane on the way over. Seemed like a cool concept. I gave up after awhile as it didn't seem to be going anywhere.


Flying Virgin? I also tried ot watch it but instead fell asleep
Watched Fruitvale Station re: oscar Grant shooting by BART police officer.

While factually questionable, the movie was extremely gripping. Open sobbing in the theater, people yelling at the screen for Grant to make it although it was obvious that he did not - near the end of the movie the gentleman behind me had what was originally thought to be a heart attack, but just turned out to be an anxiety-based reaction to the shooting scene.
quote:
Originally posted by bates40:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
A Late Quartet

Catherine Keener, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Christopher (Cowbell) Walken. What could go wrong?


I tried watching this on the plane on the way over. Seemed like a cool concept. I gave up after awhile as it didn't seem to be going anywhere.


Flying Virgin? I also tried ot watch it but instead fell asleep


Swiss. I switched over to the Fellowship of the Ring.
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
.

Doc Hollywood
Just felt like watching it again. Still cute, funny. The lake scene with Julie Warner always gets my blood a pumping.


I never understood why she did not become a bigger star - was great in that film. Very underrated movie


It was filmed in part in Micanopy, FL, just south of Gainesville and on my commutes to/from home when I was a student, I'd drive through on my way back and think I was in Grady! Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Pinotlvr:
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
.

Doc Hollywood
Just felt like watching it again. Still cute, funny. The lake scene with Julie Warner always gets my blood a pumping.


I never understood why she did not become a bigger star - was great in that film. Very underrated movie


It was filmed in part in Micanopy, FL, just south of Gainesville and on my commutes to/from home when I was a student, I'd drive through on my way back and think I was in Grady! Smile


It's a great film and holds up well. I also thought it was a shame when Pixar ripped off the plot and re-made it into Cars. Prior to that, their films had been original and inventive.
Atlas Shrugged II. We watched the first one and it was pretty bad, but had a moment or two. It's going to be a trilogy. So we watched the second one. One interesting thing is they replaced the entire cast. But it didn't matter, as my wife so correctly put it, "It's uniformly mediocre." There is literally not one moment that's worth anyone's time, but it's hard to stop watching. You keep thinking there must be something of value coming up. But no.

Can't wait for the final part in 2014!
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Lady Vanishes

Winner An under-appreciated movie, imo.

Spring Breakers
Interesting. Not particularly sexy, despite Vanessa and Ashley looking amazing and running around in bikinis. (And the other two, as well.) Hardly a plot to speak of. But an interesting deconstruction of "spring break" culture. The distance between James Franco's excellent controlled over-the-top performance and the others' capabilities is in full view, but it doesn't detract as the girls are supposed to be novi. I'm not certain if it is good or not. But it is somewhat interesting, if long (at 90 minutes) for what it is. B-