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quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by patespo1:
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
I liked This is 40 even though Winetarelli's criticism is mostly correct also. Probably because I am 40 - was anyway when I saw the flick that I liked it anyway

+1. At 39 with young children I found a number of relatable parts. My wife enjoyed as well.

Neither of us went with the mindset that it was anything more than a good laugh.

I forgot my strongest criticism of the movie...

I am (all too) aware that when parents have mid-life crises they sometimes allow those to affect their children. And even sometimes they take out their own problems on their children. In This is 40 the parents, almost relentlessly, take out their mid-life crises on their children and the movie's point of view gives the parents a free pass on it. The free pass really turned me off.


To each his own, again I didnt approach it as something that I would set my moral compass by, rather a couple hours of fun.
Has anyone here watched The Host?. And anyone here a fan of the talented young actress Saorise Ronan? I think she is incredible, but often end-up cast in a lot of mediocre movies.

I first noticed her in The Way Back (2010), not to be confused with The way, way back (2013). This girl had a minor screen time but pivotal role in the film. Anyways, today I saw a youtube trailer of "The Host" starring Saorise Ronan, I was like, Cool. But then the trailer read "From the author of Twilight Saga". Well... shit. Thoughts anyone?
This is the End

B/B-

Further review tomorrow, but it is basically exactly as it advertises. Six famous buddies in a house dealing with the apocalypse and the ridiculousness, conversationally and situationally, that ensues. The fact that the characters are playing it straight (well, as straight as possible, and they are pretty self-aware) and not winking at the camera is what makes the movie work. Although, "work" is relative as, despite very good production value, the scope of the movie is necessarily limited. I expect some will hate it, some will love it, and some will find it just above average -- which is where I fall. (There were, however, about a half dozen times I laughed out loud.) Also, I needn't state the obvious, but there is a wonderful, though brief, bit of fresh air in the movie; timing-wise, however, I think it happens too early.

Another addendum for tonight: while it is never mentioned in the movie, an unstated joke running through the movie is that virtually everyone involved in the movie is Jewish, which wouldn't be funny if it weren't for their universal (movie) acceptance of the Christian god. "The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit are all the same thing. It is like tiramisu." Yes, that line happened.
Last edited by winetarelli
Re: Moonrise Kingdom

After seeing one too many of his (Wes Anderson) films, I find the quirky personalities, families and plots to actually be formulaic and pretentious. But I'm in the minority.

City of Your Final Destination - Bad title for a great little drama. Directed by James Ivory. As always, Laura Linney is a pleasure to watch and stands out among other actors.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
In Bruges - in preparation for a visit to Bruges in July. Started very slowly but loved it by the end. And looking forward even more to seeing the city itself.


bman, I hope you visit on a beautiful day. I love Bruges.

I find Bruges to be a peaceful and relaxing village. Grab a table for lunch next to a window and enjoy the view with a simple lunch and a bottle of Rose or a white of your choice.

If I can find the name of the restaurant we enjoyed I will post it.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
In Bruges - in preparation for a visit to Bruges in July. Started very slowly but loved it by the end. And looking forward even more to seeing the city itself.


bman, I hope you visit on a beautiful day. I love Bruges.

I find Bruges to be a peaceful and relaxing village. Grab a table for lunch next to a window and enjoy the view with a simple lunch and a bottle of Rose or a white of your choice.

If I can find the name of the restaurant we enjoyed I will post it.


Thanks w+a. We'd appreciate any recommendations. In fact we will be 4-5 days in Belgium, most in Ghent, and would appreciate any advice.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
In Bruges - in preparation for a visit to Bruges in July. Started very slowly but loved it by the end. And looking forward even more to seeing the city itself.


bman, I hope you visit on a beautiful day. I love Bruges.

I find Bruges to be a peaceful and relaxing village. Grab a table for lunch next to a window and enjoy the view with a simple lunch and a bottle of Rose or a white of your choice.

If I can find the name of the restaurant we enjoyed I will post it.


Thanks w+a. We'd appreciate any recommendations. In fact we will be 4-5 days in Belgium, most in Ghent, and would appreciate any advice.


Will do. Our daughter is out of the country currently, but will talk to her as well. She lived in Belgium for a year while in college, and has excellent taste and knows the country well.

If all fails, drink beer, the finest in the world. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
In Bruges - in preparation for a visit to Bruges in July. Started very slowly but loved it by the end. And looking forward even more to seeing the city itself.


bman, I hope you visit on a beautiful day. I love Bruges.

I find Bruges to be a peaceful and relaxing village. Grab a table for lunch next to a window and enjoy the view with a simple lunch and a bottle of Rose or a white of your choice.

If I can find the name of the restaurant we enjoyed I will post it.


Thanks w+a. We'd appreciate any recommendations. In fact we will be 4-5 days in Belgium, most in Ghent, and would appreciate any advice.


Will do. Our daughter is out of the country currently, but will talk to her as well. She lived in Belgium for a year while in college, and has excellent taste and knows the country well.

If all fails, drink beer, the finest in the world. Cool


Agreed on your last comment. A regular stop in London, usually more than once, is Belgo, for Belgian beers and Belgian food. And the evening of June 30 will find us in the Grand Place quaffing something Belgian!
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:


If all fails, drink beer, the finest in the world. Cool


Agreed on your last comment.


I have been told by many you are a gentleman, scholar and a man of refined taste. Wink[/QUOTE]

Wow, what a compliment! Especially since you know I enjoy drinking Mollydookers!
On the spur of the moment we went out and saw Star Trek Into the Darkness last night (we missed the start of Now You See Me, so this was the back up film). Really fun popcorn flick. I think they've done a great job with being true to the TV series (and subsequent films) but updating it without following the original story lines. So, characters die now that didn't before and similar events happen but to different characters. I don't want to give any spoilers, so I won't go into detail for those who remember this stuff. But, either I wasn't paying attention to the last film and they are operating on a parallel time line or the writers / producers are really smart by re-building a new franchise out of an old one by re-mixing the old stories. My only complaint with this re-boot, is with Simon Pegg. I like him. I like his acting. I just don't think he's the right guy to play Scotty. Otherwise, I think this is a lot of fun to watch. Better than the original cast, which is weird because this cast is made to look like the original cast. So you are watching actors playing actors playing characters, at least of Spock and Bones (Zachary Quinto playing Leonard Nimoy playing Spock). It's almost like a Sat Night skit, but without the laughs and it works.
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
you are watching actors playing actors playing characters, at least of Spock and Bones (Zachary Quinto playing Leonard Nimoy playing Spock). It's almost like a Sat Night skit, but without the laughs and it works.


Well put - I haven't seen this one yet, but I thought the first one did a really good job of nailing the characters. I was a big fan of the original series as a kid and the subsequent versions never quite got there. These do IMO for the reason you state.
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:

I was a big fan of the original series as a kid and the subsequent versions never quite got there. These do IMO for the reason you state.


Ditto. I saw a lot of it after school in re-runs. I hope you've also seen Galaxy Quest. It is a really, really funny satire of Star Trek with an all star cast. Easily one of my favorite comedies made in the last 15 years.
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:

I was a big fan of the original series as a kid and the subsequent versions never quite got there. These do IMO for the reason you state.


Ditto. I saw a lot of it after school in re-runs. I hope you've also seen Galaxy Quest. It is a really, really funny satire of Star Trek with an all star cast. Easily one of my favorite comedies made in the last 15 years.


+1
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
On the spur of the moment we went out and saw Star Trek Into the Darkness last But, either I wasn't paying attention to the last film and they are operating on a parallel time line or the writers / producers are really smart by re-building a new franchise out of an old one by re-mixing the old stories.

The former, it showed it to be a parallel world. That's why they're able to tork the legacy and yet keep it logical.
Last edited by The Old Man
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:

The former, it showed it to be a parallel world. That's why they're able to tork the legacy and yet keep it logical.


Great. Thanks for clearing that up!

Safe - action flick with Jason Statham my wife put in the queue. Similar plot to Mercury Rising with Bruce Willis. Body count is so high (50+?) that you get desensitized and the film just seems long. Carnage includes Chinese, Russian, NYPD good and bad cops.
Django Unchained

I'm not a huge Tarentino fan, so despite the great reviews I was a bit surprised at how much I enjoyed this. I believe I read somewhere that Will Smith was originally offered the Django part but turned it down. As I watched the film I kept thinking it would not as been as good with Smith in the role as I thought Jaime Foxx did a great job.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Le Beau Serge

I just realized I've never seen one Chabrol film.


I'm very surprised, T.O.M. Eek

I would watch Hitchcock's, Shadow of a Doubt, then watch this Chabrol film, his very first.

Not a director for the masses IMO, his films tend to be often more anxiety driven as they are thriller based, but not wanting to split hairs. Wink

Besides La Ceremonie , check out Le Boucher & La Femme Infidele also. Two of my favorites.

Please share your thoughts if you watch any of his movies.
The Bling Ring

Oh, where even to begin? First let me say this. The review meter on Rotten Tomatoes is hovering around 60% -- and I don't understand that. Usually if I really like a movie I can still gauge with fair accuracy if others will as well. Similarly if I don't like a movie I can generally tell if it is just me or if it is a broader thing. I found The Bling Ring to be very good; and while I can certainly understand a "just above average" rating from any particular reviewer, it is hard for me to see 6/10 (3/5) as not being the worst a reviewer could say.

For those that don't know, this is Sofia Coppola's new movie about a bunch of economically comfortable, middle class, teenagers who decide to rob from celebrities -- pretty much just to have fun. The movie is closely based on actual events of just a few years ago.

What I found frustrating and compelling about the movie was how small these teens' lives were. "Let's get the f--k out of here" is said about 8 times in the movie... but that is the only way a 16/17 year old boy is going to talk. Sofia doesn't give context outside of the celebrity world, so you are watching realizing this is all the kids know.

Sofia also doesn't moralize or try to explain. At all. There are only two examples of even coming close. In one scene where the teenage banditos are in Paris Hilton's house you see Paris' face on everything -- including her furniture. Which could be intentional social commentary on the vacuousness of celebrity culture... but they actually shot in Paris' house and that is her actual furniture and decoration. The other way -- and this is real, too -- is that Nicki's (in real life, Alexis Neiers') mom home schools her and Sam (in real life, Tess Taylor) in "The Secret" with vision boards, etc. The only possible explanatory literary license there is when 16/17 year old Nicki comes home at 4am on a school night without calling, the next morning her mom says, "well, try to do better next time, ok?" and that is it.

At once I was engaged in the thrill of the chase but also horrified at how far these kids could go without anyone stopping to realize it was wrong. Without moralizing there is an emptiness left at the end of the movie. Without giving broader context or moral framework, you're left with, "ok. This happened. And....?" But I think that is kinda the point. And I didn't feel bad about it -- it was for the audience to decide.

Sofia cast the movie in odd ways. A mixture of true unknowns (the two biggest leads) two teens with strong (in one case exceptionally strong) industry connections (leads numbers 4 and 5) and then Emma Watson as the third lead. Emma's SoCal (Alexis - specific) accent was spot on. There were one or two times in the movie you could tell she was thinking about her accent, but apart from that she was excellent. The problem with her being excellent, though, is that she blew everyone else off the screen and she was not the lead. There were almost times when it felt awkward to watch the non lead eat up the screen in comparison to the leads in the way she was doing. The only person who kept up with her was Leslie Mann, playing her mom, who was in the movie for just a few brief scenes. The other four main robbers were all fine. Good, even; but even the oscar-winner's daughter was only 16/17 when filming and this was her first acting job apart from being essentially an extra in The Dark Knight Rises -- so she was only as good as you could expect her to be. Gavin Rossdale was good in his small role.

Overall, this certainly wasn't a masterpiece. But it is probably my second favorite of Sofia's movies. (Though, yes, way, way, WAY behind Lost in Translation.) Worthy of checking out. And also, I found it pretty "fun".

B+
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
The Bling Ring

Oh, where even to begin? First let me say this. The review meter on Rotten Tomatoes is hovering around 60% -- and I don't understand that. Usually if I really like a movie I can still gauge with fair accuracy if others will as well. Similarly if I don't like a movie I can generally tell if it is just me or if it is a broader thing. I found The Bling Ring to be very good; and while I can certainly understand a "just above average" rating from any particular reviewer, it is hard for me to see 6/10 (3/5) as not being the worst a reviewer could say.

For those that don't know, this is Sofia Coppola's new movie about a bunch of economically comfortable, middle class, teenagers who decide to rob from celebrities -- pretty much just to have fun. The movie is closely based on actual events of just a few years ago.

What I found frustrating and compelling about the movie was how small these teens' lives were. "Let's get the f--k out of here" is said about 8 times in the movie... but that is the only way a 16/17 year old boy is going to talk. Sofia doesn't give context outside of the celebrity world, so you are watching realizing this is all the kids know.

Sofia also doesn't moralize or try to explain. At all. There are only two examples of even coming close. In one scene where the teenage banditos are in Paris Hilton's house you see Paris' face on everything -- including her furniture. Which could be intentional social commentary on the vacuousness of celebrity culture... but they actually shot in Paris' house and that is her actual furniture and decoration. The other way -- and this is real, too -- is that Nicki's (in real life, Alexis Neiers') mom home schools her and Sam (in real life, Tess Taylor) in "The Secret" with vision boards, etc. The only possible explanatory literary license there is when 16/17 year old Nicki comes home at 4am on a school night without calling, the next morning her mom says, "well, try to do better next time, ok?" and that is it.

At once I was engaged in the thrill of the chase but also horrified at how far these kids could go without anyone stopping to realize it was wrong. Without moralizing there is an emptiness left at the end of the movie. Without giving broader context or moral framework, you're left with, "ok. This happened. And....?" But I think that is kinda the point. And I didn't feel bad about it -- it was for the audience to decide.

Sofia cast the movie in odd ways. A mixture of true unknowns (the two biggest leads) two teens with strong (in one case exceptionally strong) industry connections (leads numbers 4 and 5) and then Emma Watson as the third lead. Emma's SoCal (Alexis - specific) accent was spot on. There were one or two times in the movie you could tell she was thinking about her accent, but apart from that she was excellent. The problem with her being excellent, though, is that she blew everyone else off the screen and she was not the lead. There were almost times when it felt awkward to watch the non lead eat up the screen in comparison to the leads in the way she was doing. The only person who kept up with her was Leslie Mann, playing her mom, who was in the movie for just a few brief scenes. The other four main robbers were all fine. Good, even; but even the oscar-winner's daughter was only 16/17 when filming and this was her first acting job apart from being essentially an extra in The Dark Knight Rises -- so she was only as good as you could expect her to be. Gavin Rossdale was good in his small role.

Overall, this certainly wasn't a masterpiece. But it is probably my second favorite of Sofia's movies. (Though, yes, way, way, WAY behind Lost in Translation.) Worthy of checking out. And also, I found it pretty "fun".

B+


Former15, thanks for the review.

The Dallas Morning News listed it as a to see movie this past weekend.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
The Bling Ring

Oh, where even to begin? First let me say this. The review meter on Rotten Tomatoes is hovering around 60% -- and I don't understand that. Usually if I really like a movie I can still gauge with fair accuracy if others will as well. Similarly if I don't like a movie I can generally tell if it is just me or if it is a broader thing. I found The Bling Ring to be very good; and while I can certainly understand a "just above average" rating from any particular reviewer, it is hard for me to see 6/10 (3/5) as not being the worst a reviewer could say.

For those that don't know, this is Sofia Coppola's new movie about a bunch of economically comfortable, middle class, teenagers who decide to rob from celebrities -- pretty much just to have fun. The movie is closely based on actual events of just a few years ago.

What I found frustrating and compelling about the movie was how small these teens' lives were. "Let's get the f--k out of here" is said about 8 times in the movie... but that is the only way a 16/17 year old boy is going to talk. Sofia doesn't give context outside of the celebrity world, so you are watching realizing this is all the kids know.

Sofia also doesn't moralize or try to explain. At all. There are only two examples of even coming close. In one scene where the teenage banditos are in Paris Hilton's house you see Paris' face on everything -- including her furniture. Which could be intentional social commentary on the vacuousness of celebrity culture... but they actually shot in Paris' house and that is her actual furniture and decoration. The other way -- and this is real, too -- is that Nicki's (in real life, Alexis Neiers') mom home schools her and Sam (in real life, Tess Taylor) in "The Secret" with vision boards, etc. The only possible explanatory literary license there is when 16/17 year old Nicki comes home at 4am on a school night without calling, the next morning her mom says, "well, try to do better next time, ok?" and that is it.

At once I was engaged in the thrill of the chase but also horrified at how far these kids could go without anyone stopping to realize it was wrong. Without moralizing there is an emptiness left at the end of the movie. Without giving broader context or moral framework, you're left with, "ok. This happened. And....?" But I think that is kinda the point. And I didn't feel bad about it -- it was for the audience to decide.

Sofia cast the movie in odd ways. A mixture of true unknowns (the two biggest leads) two teens with strong (in one case exceptionally strong) industry connections (leads numbers 4 and 5) and then Emma Watson as the third lead. Emma's SoCal (Alexis - specific) accent was spot on. There were one or two times in the movie you could tell she was thinking about her accent, but apart from that she was excellent. The problem with her being excellent, though, is that she blew everyone else off the screen and she was not the lead. There were almost times when it felt awkward to watch the non lead eat up the screen in comparison to the leads in the way she was doing. The only person who kept up with her was Leslie Mann, playing her mom, who was in the movie for just a few brief scenes. The other four main robbers were all fine. Good, even; but even the oscar-winner's daughter was only 16/17 when filming and this was her first acting job apart from being essentially an extra in The Dark Knight Rises -- so she was only as good as you could expect her to be. Gavin Rossdale was good in his small role.

Overall, this certainly wasn't a masterpiece. But it is probably my second favorite of Sofia's movies. (Though, yes, way, way, WAY behind Lost in Translation.) Worthy of checking out. And also, I found it pretty "fun".

The movie was probably better than her sparkling wine.

B+
[QUOTE]Originally posted by mpls wine guy:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by winetarelli:
The Bling Ring

Oh, where even to begin? First let me say this. The review meter on Rotten Tomatoes is hovering around 60% -- and I don't understand that. Usually if I really like a movie I can still gauge with fair accuracy if others will as well. Similarly if I don't like a movie I can generally tell if it is just me or if it is a broader thing. I found The Bling Ring to be very good; and while I can certainly understand a "just above average" rating from any particular reviewer, it is hard for me to see 6/10 (3/5) as not being the worst a reviewer could say.

For those that don't know, this is Sofia Coppola's new movie about a bunch of economically comfortable, middle class, teenagers who decide to rob from celebrities -- pretty much just to have fun. The movie is closely based on actual events of just a few years ago.

What I found frustrating and compelling about the movie was how small these teens' lives were. "Let's get the f--k out of here" is said about 8 times in the movie... but that is the only way a 16/17 year old boy is going to talk. Sofia doesn't give context outside of the celebrity world, so you are watching realizing this is all the kids know.

Sofia also doesn't moralize or try to explain. At all. There are only two examples of even coming close. In one scene where the teenage banditos are in Paris Hilton's house you see Paris' face on everything -- including her furniture. Which could be intentional social commentary on the vacuousness of celebrity culture... but they actually shot in Paris' house and that is her actual furniture and decoration. The other way -- and this is real, too -- is that Nicki's (in real life, Alexis Neiers') mom home schools her and Sam (in real life, Tess Taylor) in "The Secret" with vision boards, etc. The only possible explanatory literary license there is when 16/17 year old Nicki comes home at 4am on a school night without calling, the next morning her mom says, "well, try to do better next time, ok?" and that is it.

At once I was engaged in the thrill of the chase but also horrified at how far these kids could go without anyone stopping to realize it was wrong. Without moralizing there is an emptiness left at the end of the movie. Without giving broader context or moral framework, you're left with, "ok. This happened. And....?" But I think that is kinda the point. And I didn't feel bad about it -- it was for the audience to decide.

Sofia cast the movie in odd ways. A mixture of true unknowns (the two biggest leads) two teens with strong (in one case exceptionally strong) industry connections (leads numbers 4 and 5) and then Emma Watson as the third lead. Emma's SoCal (Alexis - specific) accent was spot on. There were one or two times in the movie you could tell she was thinking about her accent, but apart from that she was excellent. The problem with her being excellent, though, is that she blew everyone else off the screen and she was not the lead. There were almost times when it felt awkward to watch the non lead eat up the screen in comparison to the leads in the way she was doing. The only person who kept up with her was Leslie Mann, playing her mom, who was in the movie for just a few brief scenes. The other four main robbers were all fine. Good, even; but even the oscar-winner's daughter was only 16/17 when filming and this was her first acting job apart from being essentially an extra in The Dark Knight Rises -- so she was only as good as you could expect her to be. Gavin Rossdale was good in his small role.

Overall, this certainly wasn't a masterpiece. But it is probably my second favorite of Sofia's movies. (Though, yes, way, way, WAY behind Lost in Translation.) Worthy of checking out. And also, I found it pretty "fun".

The movie was probably better than her sparkling wine.
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
quote:
Originally posted by kid lightning:
Went to a screening of SOMM last night and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Good flick, highly recommend.


+1
Watched it on iTunes over the last couple of nights and really enjoyed it for what it is. Only complaint is two or three to many exploding glass shots.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
The Bling Ring
Emma's SoCal (Alexis - specific) accent was spot on. There were one or two times in the movie you could tell she was thinking about her accent, but apart from that she was excellent. The problem with her being excellent, though, is that she blew everyone else off the screen and she was not the lead. There were almost times when it felt awkward to watch the non lead eat up the screen in comparison to the leads in the way she was doing.
I sense personal affectionate bias here... Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
A Shot in the Dark

One of my favorites.
Give me ten men like Clouseau and I could destroy the world.


It's my favorite Clouseau movie I think.

#2 for me, behind The Return of the Pink Panther (the one where Christopher Plummer plays "Sir Charles Phantom, the notorious litton")
I guess I've seen too many of these movies, where an ordinary guy is switched with a leader (think "Dave"), and has to pretend to be the leader. During that process, he turns out to be a more compassionate and effective leader than the original dude. And of course, somehow pulls a switch at the end so that he can return to his normal life, wiser and secure in the knowledge that only he knows that a switch was ever made.

I do agree that Raul Julia is a fine actor. Watching him in this made me want to pop in "Presumed Innocent", where he does a magnificent role as a defense attorney.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I guess I've seen too many of these movies, where an ordinary guy is switched with a leader (think "Dave"), and has to pretend to be the leader. During that process, he turns out to be a more compassionate and effective leader than the original dude.

The only time it worked was in Bananas (of course it's not quite serious) and the scene with the translator is priceless.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Touch of Evil

Big Grin

I know it is not a commonly held opinion, but this is my favorite of Welles' movies.


Ditto.

The opening sequence was shot in Venice (LA) by the boardwalk. Same with the final scene in the canal and oil wells. The area has been cleaned up but the buildings are still there and recognizable.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
Lincoln



For some reason I just cannot get excited about watching this.


I agree - hard to get fired up about a story that we already know the ending, we have studied ad nauseum our whole lives, and watched multiple documentaries. With that said, I will watch it to see the great DDL. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
Lincoln



For some reason I just cannot get excited about watching this.


DDL is great, but the movie is really dull.


I finally watched it this weekend. I wasn't in a huge rush to watch it, but I enjoyed and didn't find it dull -- though a bit slow moving in parts certainly. Several very good performances other than Lewis'. And though some point out that they already know the ending, if that were the criteria for not watching a film I'd guess I'd have to pass on about three-quarters of all Hollywood films made as the endings are obivious.
Madden is a acquired taste, his most accessible might be The Saddest Song in the World. He crosses German Expressionism with Soviet Constructivism with a soupcon of David Lynch thrown in. They are often very funny as you can see from just the first 10 minutes of Careful or from the title alone of the short, Sissy-Boy Slap-Party.

Though he doesn't use stars we'd recognize, he has worked a number of timea with Isabella Rossellini. His latest feature Keyhole is very difficult, but you've got to love this summary on IMDB, "Gangster and deadbeat dad, Ulysses Pick, (Jason Patric) embarks on an unusual journey through his home."
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Touch of Evil was available on demand last night.


Can you think of a greater opening scene in any movie?

As an art enthusiast, my eye always catches the Jacques Mahe de la Villegle / Mimmo Rotella like wall seen as the camera tracks the bomb moving toward to car.

One of the greatest movies ever.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Touch of Evil was available on demand last night.


Can you think of a greater opening scene in any movie?

As an art enthusiast, my eye always catches the Jacques Mahe de la Villegle / Mimmo Rotella like wall seen as the camera tracks the bomb moving toward to car.

One of the greatest movies ever.


I'm struck by how Welles uses the camera and light and darkness in this movie. It reminds me a lot of the Third Man. I'd like to see this and the Third Man on a big screen sometime.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:


Can you think of a greater opening scene in any movie?



First 2 minutes of Ghandi. What amazed me-- and still does-- is that Attenborough was able to resist the temptation to use that scene again in the movie, given the impressive logistics and cost of filming that incredible recreation of the funeral procession. No CGI here.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
We now have 3 nominees for greatest opening scene ever, keep 'em coming. Smile

There were several that I thought of in addiction to, but not named yet. Wink



It's true-- there ARE no spelling mistakes!! Big Grin


Oops. Red Face

One thing about iPad, it will make you look silly sometimes. It has a mind all its own, and thinks it can project what you want to say. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
We now have 3 nominees for greatest opening scene ever, keep 'em coming. Smile

There were several that I thought of in addiction to, but not named yet. Wink



It's true-- there ARE no spelling mistakes!! Big Grin


Oops. Red Face

One thing about iPad, it will make you look silly sometimes. It has a mind all its own, and thinks it can project what you want to say. Wink




No, no, my friend, it did not make you look silly at all! For someone who loves cinema as you do, it was actually the perfect slip. Smile
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Originally posted by aphilla:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by aphilla:
Touch of Evil was available on demand last night.


Can you think of a greater opening scene in any movie?

As an art enthusiast, my eye always catches the Jacques Mahe de la Villegle / Mimmo Rotella like wall seen as the camera tracks the bomb moving toward to car.

One of the greatest movies ever.


I'm struck by how Welles uses the camera and light and darkness in this movie. It reminds me a lot of the Third Man. I'd like to see this and the Third Man on a big screen sometime.

I don't know if you meant this, but it's directed by Carol Reed.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
We now have 3 nominees for greatest opening scene ever, keep 'em coming. Smile

There were several that I thought of in addition to, but not named yet. Wink


I can't really watch the opening of Saving Private Ryan - not the battle sequence but the scene in the American cemetery in Normandy.

I imagine there are a lot of great opening sequences in action movies like James Bond/Raiders of the Lost Ark type openings, but I would kind of rule all of those out without even thinking about them.

When I think of great movie openings, the first scene from the Godfather is probably it.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by aphilla:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Touch of Evil was available on demand last night.


Can you think of a greater opening scene in any movie?

As an art enthusiast, my eye always catches the Jacques Mahe de la Villegle / Mimmo Rotella like wall seen as the camera tracks the bomb moving toward to car.

One of the greatest movies ever.


I'm struck by how Welles uses the camera and light and darkness in this movie. It reminds me a lot of the Third Man. I'd like to see this and the Third Man on a big screen sometime.

I don't know if you meant this, but it's directed by Carol Reed.


The Third Man, you mean. Yeah, the obvious connection is that Welles acts in both, but the camera work in the two reminds me of the other.
Ugh. Too much to write here, I'm going to use quote marks to save time. W+A really interesting thoughts on the beginning of "TOE." There are just to many greats for me. As we've discussed how to can top a dead man discussing his deadness as in "Sunset Blvd"? Or the greatest, longest opening of "Once Upon A Time In The West"? Or "Citizen Kane"'s opening that pretty much tells the story of the entire movie? Or the two bombers making love to a romance song in "Dr. Strangelove..." Or all the motifs being setup at the start of "La Dolce Vita"?

This is all too much for me to be thinking about this 4th of July holiday morning.
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Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by aphilla:
Touch of Evil was available on demand last night.


Can you think of a greater opening scene in any movie?

As an art enthusiast, my eye always catches the Jacques Mahe de la Villegle / Mimmo Rotella like wall seen as the camera tracks the bomb moving toward to car.

One of the greatest movies ever.


I'm struck by how Welles uses the camera and light and darkness in this movie. It reminds me a lot of the Third Man. I'd like to see this and the Third Man on a big screen sometime.

I don't know if you meant this, but it's directed by Carol Reed.


The Third Man, you mean. Yeah, the obvious connection is that Welles acts in both, but the camera work in the two reminds me of the other.

Speaking of which, even though it's just the credits, the feeling that you get seeing the still zither and then the strings moving to play that great them song--sublime.

Also I found this critic's response on Wikipedia, "The film's unusual camera angles, however, were not appreciated by all critics at the time. C. A. Lejeune in The Observer described Reed's "habit of printing his scenes askew, with floors sloping at a diagonal and close-ups deliriously tilted" as "most distracting". American director William Wyler, a close friend of Reed's, sent him a spirit level, with a note saying, "Carol, next time you make a picture, just put it on top of the camera, will you?"

Completing missing the point: Holly is an American who is constantly being thrown of guard, he's never sure of his footing and it's all reflected in the pace and style of the film.

And while we're on great openings, how about the great ending? (No spoiler) Reed takes an incredible amount of time to get to the punchline.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
"Sunset Blvd"? Or the greatest, longest opening of "Once Upon A Time In The West"? Or "Citizen Kane"'s opening that pretty much tells the story of the entire movie? " Or all the motifs being setup at the start of "La Dolce Vita"?



Well done!

I think 8 1/2 & The Godfather should also be in any debate as well.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
...and for the record. I prefer my movies to just start please, completely devoid of any credits and such until the end.


Don't know if it is still true but the Academy requires the film Title, Director, Producer and maybe 1 or 2 other names to roll at the beginning or it will not be considered for an Academy award. There was controversy with a film that had the Title only (if I remember correctly) and was excluded from consideration. Conversely, at one time (maybe still true) some directors / producers put all the credits at the front because the film is so bad that you would not see the entire film or if you did, would wait for the credits to finish.
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Don't know if it is still true but the Academy requires the film Title, Director, Producer and maybe 1 or 2 other names to roll at the beginning or it will not be considered for an Academy award.

I can name several examples of films from the past 10 years that won / were nominated for Oscars without this being the case. So, if it was ever true, it isn't now.
On the opening credit debate. All movies used to open with all the credits first. I think that changed in the 1960s. However Citizen Kane (what else?) bucked that in the 1941. It appears that the first sound picture to do this was Fantasia, but unlike CK, it's a non-linear collection of "music videos."

While researching I was reminded that Touch of Evil has no opening credits, but that when it was first released it had been butchered by the studio and had credits during the, as noted, great opening sequence. This is the version I'd always seen. It wasn't until the great editor, Walter Murch restored it using Welles notes in 1998 that we could truly appreciate Welles' vision. I saw this in the theatre at that time I was in heaven. If only the same thing could be done with The Magnificent Ambersons, but alas the components do not exist.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:


While researching I was reminded that Touch of Evil has no opening credits,


I cannot imagine opening credits in this movie. Having some credits rolling as the bomb is ticking would ruin the first 3 1/2 minutes of genius.

Opening credits would also have ruined Apocalypse Now, an awesome opening scene.
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Originally posted by mneeley490:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by mneeley490:
I dunno, I kinda liked the opening sequence in Casino Royale.


Circa '67? Big Grin


I'd rather be tied to a chair and forced to watch Gigli 100 times, then that POS.


Big Grin That was my assumption, but thought the '67 movie might have been during your psychedelic stage of life. Wink
Ok,

So, first of all, how is a discussion of greatest opening scenes happening without Apocalypse Now being mentioned?

Most of my favorite movies have fantastic opening scenes that really, in one way or another, throw you into the story whilst making the viewer care. Movies that have yet to be mentioned from The Producers (1967) to the narrative techniques of The Lord of the Rings and The Princess Bride are amongst my favorites. The subtlety of the opening sequences of A Room With a View set against the romance of "O Mio Babbino Caro." So many of my favorite movies have great opening scenes.

Now, all that said, last night I watched:
Pitch Perfect

Stay with me on this review, because I may be on to a new concept ("EIR"(c)) here...

Some movies try to be stupid and through that find humor and/or quality. 99% of these movies, however, are, in fact, just stupid -- often horrendous. Think most Adam Sandler movies. Then occasionally, a movie tries to find comedy or warmth or something good through stupidity and succeeds. See Kingpin. Of course, I think it takes a certain level of intelligence to make a movie a stupid as Kingpin, and so hilariously, at that. What is true of all these movies, though, is that they are actively trying to be stupid. And you can tell watching them, "Oh. They are trying to be stupid."

There was nothing added to Pitch Perfect to make it more stupid. It doesn't feel like the writer said, "you know how I could really dumb this down?..." Instead, as a concept, as a self-contained, every-piece-in-sync, there is no "deeper", this movie is quite possibly the single stupidest feature length motion picture I have seen in years.

Also, I really liked it. But more on that in a minute.

There is no character development, family relationships are used only as plot devices and are never... I can't even get into that. The music (because, you know, this is about boys vs. girls competitive collegiate a cappella groups) goes from moderate suckitude to full blown 'horrible rendition of Ace of Base' (yes, Ace of Base) catastrophic, perhaps-why-there-is-trouble-in-the-Middle-East suckitude. Dialogue? I swear, I swear, the most intelligent line in the movie, is "I ate my twin in the womb." And, given the above conversation, let me suggest not eating during the opening sequence.

All of that having been said, I enjoyed this movie. IMO, Anna Kendrick can do no wrong (except for being marginally involved in Twilight). And she really, actually shined here. Virtually everyone did, the other standout being Rebel Wilson. While this extraordinarily dumbed-down rip off of Bring it On should have been dreck, the performances were all just straight enough that they weren't winking at the camera, and just loose enough that I understood, that they all understood what sort of movie they were in. For reasons that escape me, I got somewhat emotionally invested in a couple of the characters. And there were a few times I laughed out loud... once pretty hard. It was light, and most of all, "fun".

Which brings me back to EIR. Or, Enjoyment/Intelligence Ratio. This movie has one of the very highest EIRs I've ever come across. It got an 81% on Rotten Tomatoes (78% "Top Critics") and while I cannot fully articulate why a strong majority recommendation makes sense to me for this movie, it actually does. I enjoyed it, a lot. But, wow is it stupid.
Last edited by winetarelli
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Ok,

So, first of all, how is a discussion of greatest opening scenes happening without Apocalypse Now being mentioned? Look a couple of post before this one, Former)

The subtlety of the opening sequences of A Room With a View set against the romance of "O Mio Babbino Caro. Greatness. ( which Opera, Sir?)
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:


The Great Escape


Winner