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I watched Dune on HBO Max and enjoyed it quite a lot.  I'm sure it's even more visually and audibly impressive on a big screen but watching at home allows for subtitles.  There is a LOT of sub-voiced thoughts and whispered asides which are important even though they are difficult to hear.

[Context for the above:  I'm 55 with good hearing and a good home theater system.  I did read the first book in the '80s and saw the Lynch movie in the theaters.]

I did HBO Max as well.  I'd like to see the new Bond as well but waiting until it comes to streaming.  Not going to a movie theater just yet.

Same. I’ll get Moderna boosted in the next couple of weeks and then play things by ear. My *guess* is that the combination of information coming out about people who have been boosted (perhaps especially who had Moderna originally) combined with my guess at total case numbers in my area will cause me to begin to take things easier come mid-late February. That’s my guess at the moment.

@neilk posted:

I watched Dune on HBO Max and enjoyed it quite a lot.  I'm sure it's even more visually and audibly impressive on a big screen but watching at home allows for subtitles.  There is a LOT of sub-voiced thoughts and whispered asides which are important even though they are difficult to hear.

[Context for the above:  I'm 55 with good hearing and a good home theater system.  I did read the first book in the '80s and saw the Lynch movie in the theaters.]

I saw the Lynch movie at 19 in a mob-owned Bronx apartment on a semi-inflated Aero-Bed while getting stoned with an openly gay minister (which was still rare in 1999) after a night of hard partying in Atlantic City where I got my picture taken with Paul Sorvino.

Last edited by winetarelli

Of course it's better to see Dune on a movie screen, but I'm not yet comfortable going to a theatre. Streaming it is fine if your television is set at the correct distance and height. Also you need to be able to darken the room enough so that it replicates a movie theater. When watching a "letter boxed" film the black bars should disappear and you should only see the rectangle of the actual picture.

So let's talk about how your TV should be placed. First if you put it above your fireplace, it's time for a change. You do not watch a movie with your head tilted up (unless you unfortunately got stuck in the first couple rows of a theater.) The height of the television should be with your eyeline being at least 10% to 20% above the bottom of the screen. Again think of where your eyeline is in a theatre where you sit 1/3 the distance back from the screen to back of the theatre. BTW did you know you should be sitting 1/3 back in a movie theatre?

Now what about the distance to the screen? The odds are you are sitting too far. There are two different organizations who recommend distance to screens, both for movie and home theatre. One is the older SMPTE (Society of Motion Picture & Theatre Engineers) standard. For them the ideal viewing angle to the screen is 30 degrees. This has since become the stand for home theatres. However, THX (Lucas's company) also has standards for their certification for movie screen. They recommended a slightly closer 36 degrees. I have a 75 inch and sit very close to the THX recommended 8.5 feet.

This is a calculator you can use. You only need to fill in questions 1 & 2. If you can't get close enough, or think the THX recommendation is too close, then at least try for the SMPTE distance.

Last edited by The Old Man
@The Old Man posted:

You may have artwork you've purchased. Many will consider carefully where you wanted to hang it including taking into account things like light and the height. Film is an art form too.. And TV is kind of getting there also.

I will not argue that movies (films) or even television are forms of art, as long as we can agree that they are consumed in different ways, by different people, and there is no absolute way in which a movie should be watched. 

Most of the time I am laying down when I watch our televisions, whether in the living room or bedroom.  Not sure where I would have to put my television to not be looking up at it. 

@patespo1 posted:

I will not argue that movies (films) or even television are forms of art, as long as we can agree that they are consumed in different ways, by different people, and there is no absolute way in which a movie should be watched.

Most of the time I am laying down when I watch our televisions, whether in the living room or bedroom.  Not sure where I would have to put my television to not be looking up at it.

Certainly there is no one right way. But there is a best way. And to truly appreciate the art it should be in viewed for best visual experience. Film is an art form that until relatively recently could only be viewed in a movie theater. A home theater set up is made to replicate that experience as best as possible in the home. There are guidelines for this. It is of course up to the user to decide if this is important to them.

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