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Wild in the Streets was on TCM today. One of the more ridiculous of the films that were almost made specially for hippies. (I was one but I already was a film connoisseur.) Famous for its Planet of the Apes type ending it's pretty much unwatchable and it includes one of those embarrassing over top Shelley Winters roles. Another almost totally unknown hippie film was Elliot Gould's Getting Straight. His career survived it!

@sunnylea57 posted:

Actually the term came from the 1938 play Gaslight. The George Cukor film with Boyer/Bergman/Cotten wasn’t even the first filmed version of Gaslight. But I’m sure you know that.

I did not, I stand corrected. I will say that the first film is of course mostly unknown. The play, which was popular in England, had its title changed to Angel Street when it played on Broadway. So I'm going to have to go with this:

The term "gaslight" was popularized in the general public's' mind by the release of a major Hollywood movie in 1944. It was released during the war when Americans were starved for entertainment. There was an earlier English version made in 1940 by Thorold Dickinson. His one major film was his last, Hill 55 Doesn't Answer (which I have seen) had its prints pulled out of circulation in an arraignment to make way for the Hollywood remake. Both were based on a play which was popular in England, but had its title changed to Angel Street when it played Broadway.

Amazing trivia, there is only one actor still living from the original Hollywood movie, and it was her first. It's...you'll have to look that up yourself. One of my mother's biggest thrills was running into her at Vicente Foods in Brentwood, telling her she loved her since Gaslight, and the actress telling my mom she couldn't be old enough to seen it at the time.

Last edited by The Old Man
@The Old Man posted:


Amazing trivia, there is only one actor still living from the original Hollywood movie, and it was her first. It's...you'll have to look that up yourself. One of my mother's biggest thrills was running into her at Vicente Foods in Brentwood, telling her she loved her since Gaslight, and the actress telling my mom she couldn't be old enough to seen it at the time.

Angela Lansbury.

But another actress from the film is still alive: Terry Moore. Apparently she played Paula Alquist and was uncredited. She went on to act in Mighty Joe Young and was nominated for an Oscar for Come Back, Little Sheba.

@sunnylea57 posted:

Angela Lansbury.

But another actress from the film is still alive: Terry Moore. Apparently she played Paula Alquist and was uncredited. She went on to act in Mighty Joe Young and was nominated for an Oscar for Come Back, Little Sheba.

Wow, great call. And she's even still working:

American Superman (filming)
Woman on the bus

2021 Merrily (filming)
Betty Clurman

2021 Silent Life (filming)
Lady in Black

Evie Rose (post-production)
Evie Rose

Lots of spy/espionage flicks over the last six weeks:

From Russia With Love – kitschy fun.
Die Another Day – I recall enjoying it in 2002. Not so much this time.
Mission Impossible: Fallout – better than Die Another Day.
The Imitation Game – I recall enjoying it in 2014 and also enjoyed it this time.
Michael Clayton – still excellent.
Bridge of Spies – Hanks is good; Rylance is excellent; Spielberg is Spielberg.
Charlie Wilson's War – Hanks is very good; Hoffman is excellent; Mike Nichols' hand is invisible, which is good.

Last edited by sunnylea57

Courtesy of YouTube, the other 5 of the 9 remaining Hitchcock-directed silent films.

  • Downhill (1927)
  • The Farmer's Wife (1928)
  • Easy Virtue (1928)
  • Champagne (1928)
  • The Manxman (1929)

As TOM has mentioned, The Lodger, The Ring and The Pleasure Garden (his first directorial credit) are among the most interesting, along with The Manxman and Blackmail  (the first British "talkie" but also released as a silent version).

The journey continues.

@Bytown Rick posted:

Courtesy of YouTube, the other 5 of the 9 remaining Hitchcock-directed silent films.

  • Downhill (1927)
  • The Farmer's Wife (1928)
  • Easy Virtue (1928)
  • Champagne (1928)
  • The Manxman (1929)

As TOM has mentioned, The Lodger, The Ring and The Pleasure Garden (his first directorial credit) are among the most interesting, along with The Manxman and Blackmail  (the first British "talkie" but also released as a silent version).

The journey continues.

I highly recommend this book. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light

I know of no better book about a director in general and about Hitchcock in particular (of whom dozens of books have been written about and his films.) And, because it's chronological it's a great companion for those doing the Hitchcock film "ride."

Last edited by The Old Man
@steve8 posted:

The Saboteur

Joining in on the Hitchcock club. Liked this one quite a lot.

What We Do in the Shadows

Pretty silly but definitely some good laughs.

I hope you've seen the TV show on FX.

FWIW it's Saboteur. "The sleeve! Tell them to hurry!" For those reading the book I recommended the importance of Norman Lloyd (Fry in this movie) in the world of all things Hitchcock can't be understated.

Last edited by The Old Man

This Friday a gift is being delivered to my TV set, David Fincher's Mank. I am a solid Citizen Kane fanboy and this is supposed to be a definitive look at the creation of the movie with a focus on its co-writer Herman Mankiewicz. Incredibly the screenplay was written by Fincher's late father who died in 2003.

However, I am not a fan of David Fincher. I still believe his first breakout movie, SE7EN, is his only really good movie. I mean what was the point of remaking The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo? I did like very much his series, Mindhunters which was unfortunately cancelled after two very successful seasons. The reason? So Fincher could work on Mank.

So last night I notice that Zodiac was on. I've avoided this film because I couldn't see the point of a mystery/thriller with no solution. I was OK with the first murders at the lovers' lane, but the scene at the lake--it was finally, why am I watching this? I don't want to see another scene of terrorized victims as we see in movie after movie. Maybe I'm getting old, well yeah I am old, but I just don't find this entertaining. Keeping my fingers crossed for Mank.

Last edited by The Old Man

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