Have been watching a great many movies of late.

 

The Highwaymen

Cargo

How it Ends (avoid)

Extinction

London Has Fallen

Resident Evil: Afterlife

Arrival

 

Last edited by brucehayes
@mneeley490 posted:

Silverado    Brian Dennehy could really chew the scenery. 

Always enjoyed.  Kasdan script I think. Great cast.  Kline, Glover, Dennehy, Linda Hunt, Costner, Scott Glenn, Goldbloom.  Underrated

Avengers - Infinity War.   Still great to watch.  Now for Endgame - not quite as good, since it isn't so Thanos-centric.

Watched Avengers - Endgame yesterday.  It's a bit strange watching it in a post-COVID time - the references to the "snap" could be said about the pandemic.

American Made.  Has been on my list for a wile now and it didn't disappoint.  Must admit that I enjoyed the manic and crazed Cruise.

@brucehayes posted:

What did you think?  I have passed by this a few times.

If you can occasionally enjoy really dumb, crude and sexually explicit humor, it’s a fun hour and a half. With all the crap going on currently, we were in the mood for something like that. Quite a few laughs and I thought Lauren Lapkus played that part really well.

No Direction Home

Dylan documentary which despite being 3½ hrs long stops at his motorcycle accident. I guess Scorsese doesn't think he did anything worthwhile after that? Yes, I know he also made Rolling Thunder Revue but that was pretty specific and kind of silly.

The last movie I watched was Bad Boys for Life. To be honest, I didn't like it much. Two old parts were much better. But it is only my opinion By the way, I've recently found a list of movies review sites, so I can read reviews before watching films. 

Last edited by Francis123
@Francis123 posted:

By the way, I've recently found a list of movies review sites, so I can read reviews before watching films. 

Wow, that's exciting. Didn't know such things existed. Thanks for the tip. 

Bikini Carwash Company--1992, certainly the best of the bikini movies (and yes I am including Bikini Car Wash Massacre.) Made for release right before the beginning of wide-screen TVs, it is still a very effective today. 

Last edited by The Old Man

I love Margaret Rutherford. As the critic Kenneth Tynan once said about her, "The unique thing about Margaret Rutherford is that she can act with her chin alone." Her greatest performance is in the movie version of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. But I have a fondness for her four movies in which she played Agatha Christie's Miss Marple. Though she does not play her exactly as written in the books her interpretation is certainly in the spirit of the books.

The Marple movies, Murder, She SaidMurder at the GallopMurder Most Foul and Murder Ahoy, managed to keep together a small regular cast, much like a TV series nowadays. One of the regulars was her husband Stringer Davis. They married when they were around 50 after courting for 15 years. They were together all the time after that and you can see their affection for each other in these film. in addition you will find a 70+ year old Rutherford acting outside on very cold days, descending a staircase backwards and in general showing her indefatigable spirit in often amazing ways.

These five movies, plus her first really big role as a medium in Blythe Spirit, usually show up on TCM periodically.

"Hopscotch"--1980--70pts. Walter Matthau adult spy "thriller" fails to achieve the charm it's going for. In addition, the director Ronald Neame, could be taken to court for his wasting the talents of Glenda Jackson.

Last edited by The Old Man
@The Old Man posted:

"Hopscotch"--1980--70pts. Walter Matthau adult spy "thriller" fails to achieve the charm it's going for. In addition, the director Ronald Neame, could be taken to court for his wasting the talents of Glenda Jackson.

I felt the same way when I saw Matthau in A Guide for the Married Man 1967. Absolutely stellar cast with nothing much to do. The movie humor would have been poor and listless, even by television standards of the time. 

@mneeley490 posted:

I felt the same way when I saw Matthau in A Guide for the Married Man 1967. Absolutely stellar cast with nothing much to do. The movie humor would have been poor and listless, even by television standards of the time. 

I saw it in downtown Chicago when it opened. Even as a hormonally charged youth I found it un-sexy and uninteresting. Did you note it's directed by Gene Kelly?!

From the NY Times: HBO Max Pulls ‘Gone With the Wind,’ Citing Racist Depictions.
The streaming service said it planned to eventually bring the 1939 film back “with a discussion of its historical context.”

I put off watching this movie until I was around 40. I just had no interest in it. When I finally did see it my thoughts were--this is a southern fairy tale about the fake nobility of the South and the happy slaves who love their "massas" on the plantation. It made me sick. Apparently it's taken the the Floyd murder to wake up those who romanticize this movie. It is interesting that there are two movies that they say would be the highest grossing of all time, when adjusted for inflation, are GWTW and Birth of a Nation originally titled The Clansman because of its heroes who come to the rescue of a white woman--the KKK.

I’m not a GWTW fan. And there is no question that it romanticizes the Antebellum South. That said, it has lasting cultural significance beyond that aspect of it, and its removal for sensitivity reasons  is a bridge too far for me. It isn’t like confederate statues on state and government grounds or having freaking military bases named after racist traitors who went to war against our country. 

@winetarelli posted:

I’m not a GWTW fan. And there is no question that it romanticizes the Antebellum South. That said, it has lasting cultural significance beyond that aspect of it, and its removal for sensitivity reasons  is a bridge too far for me. It isn’t like confederate statues on state and government grounds or having freaking military bases named after racist traitors who went to war against our country. 

I don't know what bridge you're talking about. HBO is a private company that can choose whatever it wants to show or not show. It's part of a movie library they purchased (like all media sources buy the rights to.) They are under no obligation to show everything they own. However, note that they said they would show it eventually. In addition there are at least five streaming services where you can obtain it.

@The Old Man posted:

I don't know what bridge you're talking about. HBO is a private company that can choose whatever it wants to show or not show. It's part of a movie library they purchased (like all media sources buy the rights to.) They are under no obligation to show everything they own. However, note that they said they would show it eventually. In addition there are at least five streaming services where you can obtain it.

I'm not denying any of that.  I'm just uncomfortable with pulling it mostly because of other things I see happening in the media.  Take this, for example:  

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/0...-fictional-cops.html

The counter argument would be: yeah coming for "Paw Patrol" is stupid, but re: GWTW, studios re-arrange when they release films all the time based upon current events.  This is similar to that and nothing new.

I guess I'm just always concerned about sanitization these days, one way or the other.  

@The Old Man posted:

I saw it in downtown Chicago when it opened. Even as a hormonally charged youth I found it un-sexy and uninteresting. Did you note it's directed by Gene Kelly?!

I did. I was just too embarrassed to mention it.

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