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spo posted:

Re-watched Pan's Labyrinth last night. Wow, what a movie!

Agreed. One of the 4 or 5 best films of this millennium, imo. Hard to watch more than once every few years, though. I’ve only seen it twice, last time being a few years ago, and don’t think I need to watch it for another 3 or more years. 

Also, agreed with TOM that, of Hughes directed films, I don’t like any of them except Ferris, which I adore. (Uncle Buck and Planes, Trains and Automobiles are barely passable; I actively dislike the others.  Of films he wrote but did not direct, Home Alone is great. Home Alone 2 is passable.  And Career Opportunities... well... it isn’t a good film, but it is hard to get too down on it due to other factors.  The others I really don’t like.)

That said, I’m on a Disney kick. Aladdin last night. Moana, tonight. I was spoiled as a child because I was Disney-age when the 1-2-3 punch resurgence of greatness (The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin) happened. Moana is my favorite (non-Pixar) Disney film since my childhood. 

Last edited by winetarelli
spo posted:.

Re-watched Pan's Labyrinth last night. Wow, what a movie!

Guillermo del Toro had made so many interest movies such as this one, Chronos and The Devil's BackboneBut then about about six years ago he failed at his attempt to adapt H. P. Lovecraft's At the Mountains of Madness. del Toro is a big Lovecraft fan and many of his best films show his influence. So he winds up making silliness like Pacific Rim followed by the unwatchable (for me) Shape of Water. Now I fear the worst. First up is another one of those fairy-tales-done-darkly films with PinocchioPinocchio! Followed by a totally unnecessary reboot of the wonderfully twisted Nightmare Alley. I hope one day del Toro finds his way back.

winetarelli posted:

That said, I’m on a Disney kick. Aladdin last night. Moana, tonight. I was spoiled as a child because I was Disney-age when the 1-2-3 punch resurgence of greatness (The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin) happened. Moana is my favorite (non-Pixar) Disney film since my childhood. 

Also a reminder to those who haven't seen them are the films of another animation giant, Hayao Miyazaki, starting with the indispensable Spirited Away.  Also don't overlook his other unique films like Princess Mononoke and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind.

I too am a fan of Disney's Beauty and the Beast, Disney's last true hand-drawn film, however Jean Cocteau's 1946 live action version is required viewing.

Last edited by The Old Man
The Old Man posted:
spo posted:.

Re-watched Pan's Labyrinth last night. Wow, what a movie!

Guillermo del Toro had made so many interest movies such as this one, Chronos and The Devil's BackboneBut then about about six years ago he failed at his attempt to adapt H. P. Lovecraft's At the Mountains of Madness. del Toro is a big Lovecraft fan and many of his best films show his influence. So he winds up making silliness like Pacific Rim followed by the unwatchable (for me) Shape of Water. Now I fear the worst. First up is another one of those fairy-tales-done-darkly films with PinocchioPinocchio! Followed by a totally unnecessary reboot of the wonderfully twisted Nightmare Alley. I hope one day del Toro finds his way back.

I saw Cronos and Devil's Backbone on Criterion Channel. I loved Cronos and think it is his best after Pan's Labyrinth. I also loved that show The Strain and even Hellboy. He is definitely a hit or miss type. I could imagine him making a visually stunning Pinocchio though. 

bman posted:
The Old Man posted:
napacat posted:
jcocktosten posted:

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri 

This was a great movie...

No, it wasn't.

For once I agree with Napa.  Liked this movie a lot.

Overall - I enjoyed it.  Ridiculous plot contrivances and all - but a great cast nonetheless so willing to give a pass on those and the unbelievability of it

Taping alert. A chance to see Akira Kurosawa's rarely seen High and Low. Based on, of all things, an Ed McBain 57th Precinct novel, Toshiro Mifune, who often was in the role of a samurai, here plays a shoe company executive (!) Highly recommended. TCM 2:30 pm PDT.

On April 2 at 12:30am PDT they are showing Kurosawa's version of MacBethThrone of Blood. If you haven't seen its famous ending prepared to be mind-blown.

Last edited by The Old Man
The Old Man posted:

Taping alert. A chance to see Akira Kurosawa's rarely seen High and Low. Based on, of all things, an Ed McBain 57th Precinct novel, Toshiro Mifune, who often was in the role of a samurai, here plays a shoe company executive (!) Highly recommended. TCM 2:30 pm PDT.

On April 2 at 12:30am PDT they are showing Kurosawa's version of MacBethThrone of Blood. If you haven't seen its famous ending prepared to be mind-blown.

Isn't technology great?  Saw this post and signed into my Spectrum account from my work laptop and set High and Low to record to my DVR in my living room.  Thanks for the tip Old Dude.

wineismylife posted:

Isn't technology great?  Saw this post and signed into my Spectrum account from my work laptop and set High and Low to record to my DVR in my living room.  Thanks for the tip Old Dude.

When I saw Parasite it occurred to me that director Bong Joon-ho was partly inspired by the movie. Like High and Low it has a member of the rich class living on top in a modernist house while those below live in squalor.

You can also see where Spielberg got the idea of using a shock of red in an otherwise black and white movie like Schindler's List

Last edited by The Old Man
jcocktosten posted:

Funny I was up crazy early today remembered this and was going to watch Throne of Blood but I had missed the first half

TCM is a national treasure. Ever since they started HD broadcasting, about 15 years ago, they have become an indispensable source to seeing great and important, movies. (Even if they recently adopted a really stupid slogan, "Let's Movie.") So here's the deal, if you get TCM through a cable provider (highly likely) they have a access to a changing inventory of movies you can watch through the website Watch TCM.  Right now they have ten Kurosawa movies including two other rarely seen films, Drunken Angel (his first with Toshiro Mufune) and Red Beard (his last.) When you watch Throne of Blood notice how much the  actress playing "Lady Macbeth" the great Isuzu Yamada's performance is heavily  based on theater of the Noh. 

Last edited by The Old Man
The Old Man posted:
jcocktosten posted:

Funny I was up crazy early today remembered this and was going to watch Throne of Blood but I had missed the first half

TCM is a national treasure. Ever since they started HD broadcasting, about 15 years ago, they have become an indispensable source to seeing great and important, movies. (Even if they recently adopted a really stupid slogan, "Let's Movie.") So here's the deal, if you get TCM through a cable provider (highly likely) they have a access to a changing inventory of movies you can watch through the website Watch TCM.  Right now they have ten Kurosawa movies including two other rarely seen films, Drunken Angel (his first with Toshiro Mufune) and Red Beard (his last.) When you watch Throne of Blood notice how much the  actress playing "Lady Macbeth" the great Isuzu Yamada's performance is heavily  based on theater of the Noh. 

Thanks.  Good info

While it may not fall into the "classic" category by TOM's standards, I watched one of my old favorites last night.  

Evil Roy Slade  1972 made-for-tv movie. Starred among others, John Astin, Mickey Rooney, Milton Berle, Dom DeLouise, Henry Gipson, Dick Shawn, Pat Morita, Billy Barty, and a very young Ed Begley Jr, and Penny Marshall.

Last edited by mneeley490
vinoevelo posted:
winetarelli posted:

Naked Gun 33 1/3

Classic.  Will reccomend  to my zoom-based film group this weekend.

Have you seen the much better progenitor, by the Zucker brothers and Jim Abrahams, the TV show Police Squad. It only ran for six episodes before it was cancelled by the president of ABC. The reason? "The viewer had to watch it in order to appreciate it." A TV show where so much was going on (in humor) that it required the audience to pay attention to appreciate it. Too much for American viewers. (This is also the reason that Firesign Theater were never as big as "comedy acts" like Cheech and Chong.)

One other big, big plus--no OJ. The original role of Norbert was played by Peter Lupus, Willy the strongman in Mission Impossible. I like all the original cast better than than the name brand substitutes in the movies.

Unfortunately only available on DVD--ten bucks on Amazon.

Last edited by The Old Man

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