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wineart 2 posted:
steve8 posted:

Farewell, My Lovely

Sorry Old Man but I thought this was pretty good.



If we are talking about the ‘70’s film with Robert Mitchum, I agree. Rock solid film! 

I just rewatched it again (like Steve on TCM) and found the same problems I had with it in the 70s. It's just so close, yet no cigar. Some have problems with Mitchum's age. I do not, I think he makes a very good world-weary Marlowe. However the scenes with Charlotte Rampling (about 29 years his junior) don't work. There are no sparks, it's just unbelievable. There are other problems, while it is able to bring out sexual themes that the superior Farewell, My Lovely  (91pts) was unable to at the time due to censorship, it does make some odd changes. Combining  Jules Amthor and Dr. Sonderborg into an lesbian whorehouse madam whose actions really don't make sense is one strange choice. However I still like the film and give it around 82pts.

However, the less said about Mitchum's second Marlowe effort, The Big Sleep, the better. Due to the producer the movie is shot in, and takes place in, England. It never recovers from that glaring decision. However, it did make Mitchum the only actor to play Marlowe twice in films.

Last edited by The Old Man
steve8 posted:
wineart 2 posted:
steve8 posted:

Farewell, My Lovely

Sorry Old Man but I thought this was pretty good.



If we are talking about the ‘70’s film with Robert Mitchum, I agree. Rock solid film! 

That's the one. I thought Mitchum's narration was great.

As for narration you just can't beat Dick Powell's delivery in general, like when he's drugged, "A black hole opened at my feet, I dove in." One more thing, you just can't touch the great Mike Mazurki as Moose Malloy. He also has great delivery. I think Jack O'Halloran was dubbed in FML.

Last edited by The Old Man
The Old Man posted:

As for narration you just can't beat Dick Powell's delivery in general, like when he's drugged, "A black hole opened at my feet, I dove in."

Mitchum had a few good lines in that same scene.

"Now, let's see you do something *really* tough... like gettin' up... I crawled along the floor thinking... 'How the hell can I get under that door?"

I do agree that Charlotte Rampling didn't work.

Last edited by steve8
steve8 posted:
The Old Man posted:

As for narration you just can't beat Dick Powell's delivery in general, like when he's drugged, "A black hole opened at my feet, I dove in."

Mitchum had a few good lines in that same scene.

"Now, let's see you do something *really* tough... like gettin' up... I crawled along the floor thinking... 'How the hell can I get under that door?"

I do agree that Charlotte Rampling didn't work.

Hey, I thought you have seen "Murder My Sweet." Powell delivers that line better too. And if you haven't seen it, get right on it!

The Others - 2001 - 89pts. The first time I saw this was about 15 years ago. It is such an interesting late entry in the genre of psychological ghost stories from a woman's point of view. I think the first of note is the amazing adaptation of Henry James' Turn of the Screw  The Innocents; which amazingly sticks with the book's shocking ending. A few years later Claire Bloom was haunted (?) in The Haunting - 1963.  So it was a real surprise, and worth a second visit, to see how well The Others continues this sub genre of Gothic film. Nicole Kidman's is so good as the strict mother from hell who does everything to protect her children from supernatural doings.  All three of these are shown regularly (in the correct AOR ) on TCM.

winetarelli posted:

Parasite. I really liked the first 80%. Then it got... different. 

And that's what made it great. It keeps twisting your head around in unexpected ways as it careens towards its conclusion.

Vulture has an excellent article on the film with some input from Bong Joon Ho. (All spoilers, for those who haven't seen the movie.) It's interesting that he calls it a "stairway movie."

Something of interest in general. It's concept of  the two classes are represented very much the way Kurosawa did in High and Low. The well off live on a hilltop in a modernist building and off course the low live below in squalor. FWIW, it's one of the great overlooked Kurosawa films based ,on of all things, an Ed McBain 57th Precinct novel.

For me this movie is the second best of the 21st century. And like my first best, Get Out, it found a new and unique way to talk about differences between those that have it and those that don't.

steve8 posted:

Parasite

Excellent, but that is one very dark film. I am shocked they gave it an Oscar. Trying to make up for giving  it to Green Book last year?

Parasite was the obvious choice for me but I didn’t see two films nominated. A very solid B score for me.

You didn’t like Green Book? Which film did you prefer? 

With over 8,000 voters for best  picture, I don’t think you are going to have any consensus for a “ make up” vote. 🙃

wineart 2 posted:
steve8 posted:

Parasite

Excellent, but that is one very dark film. I am shocked they gave it an Oscar. Trying to make up for giving  it to Green Book last year?

You didn’t like Green Book? Which film did you prefer? 

It was OK and better than I expected, but my expectations were pretty low. Of the others nominated, The Favourite, BlacKkKlansman, Roma. I also liked Buster Scruggs better.

steve8 posted:
wineart 2 posted:
steve8 posted:

Parasite

Excellent, but that is one very dark film. I am shocked they gave it an Oscar. Trying to make up for giving  it to Green Book last year?

You didn’t like Green Book? Which film did you prefer? 

It was OK and better than I expected, but my expectations were pretty low. Of the others nominated, The Favourite, BlacKkKlansman, Roma. I also liked Buster Scruggs better.

FWIW: BlacKKKlansman was my favorite film last year, followed by The Favourite and then Roma and Green Book.  

robsutherland posted:

In the Name of the Father

Two of modern day's best actors in Pete Postlethwaite and Daniel Day Lewis. Emma Thompson isn't half bad either. I forgot how gripping this story was.

1994 was an amazing year for film.

I remember seeing it in the theatre when I was in college.  Showcase cinema in Seekonk Mass (just over the Rhode Island border)

Punch-Drunk Love--91pts. I have never had a favorite actor. To me it's all about the director's choices. I've never seen more than a few minutes of any Adam Sandler movies, but he is perfectly cast in P.T. Anderson's 2002 film. This is a typical untypical Anderson film and Sandler fits right in as a salesman with anger issues and seven sisters. The soundtrack is very out front as with There Will Be Blood and very interesting. However I subtracted a point from the film's total point score for daring to bring back the worst vocal song in the history of cinema: the horrendous "He Needs Me" from the horrendous Popeye.

Last edited by The Old Man
sunnylea57 posted:
The Old Man posted:
steve8 posted:

Secrets & Lies

One of Mike Leigh's happier films.

Love Mike Leigh... but one New Years Eve we decided to watch All or Nothing. The perfect choice for a festive occasion. It's still a running joke with us. Of all his films, it has to be the most depressing. And that's saying something.

I made a similar mistake on a family holiday years ago.  We were in a hotel and I suggested we watch The Family Stone.  Depressed the hell out of everyone.  

bman posted:
mneeley490 posted:
bman posted:

Ferris Bueller's Day Off.

If you are feeling down in the dumps, spend a couple of hours with Ferris, it will perk you right up!

His girlfriend was hot. I wonder whatever happened to her.

Mia Sara.  Another reason to watch the film again.  

Besides hot she has something special that you couldn't quite place. She never had much of a career but is best known for female lead to Jean-Claude Van Dam in Time Cop. The wonderful Alan Ruck who plays Ferris' buddy Cameron, went on to television. And of course Jeffery Jones, principle Rooney is on the national sex offender database.

I do not like any of John Hughes' movies except this one which I love. (And some say I only like arty movies.) I can't think of a movie that's a better tribute to Chicago, right down to its architecture . Also it's a look into a now faded North Shore social scene that we from nearby Skokie could only observe from a distance.

The Old Man posted:
bman posted:
mneeley490 posted:
bman posted:

Ferris Bueller's Day Off.

If you are feeling down in the dumps, spend a couple of hours with Ferris, it will perk you right up!

His girlfriend was hot. I wonder whatever happened to her.

Mia Sara.  Another reason to watch the film again.  

She never had much of a career but is best known for female lead to Jean-Claude Van Dam in Time Cop

Or perhaps for Legend, alongside a very young Tom Cruise

bman posted:
The Old Man posted:
bman posted:
mneeley490 posted:
bman posted:

Ferris Bueller's Day Off.

If you are feeling down in the dumps, spend a couple of hours with Ferris, it will perk you right up!

His girlfriend was hot. I wonder whatever happened to her.

Mia Sara.  Another reason to watch the film again.  

She never had much of a career but is best known for female lead to Jean-Claude Van Dam in Time Cop

Or perhaps for Legend, alongside a very young Tom Cruise

bman posted:
The Old Man posted:
bman posted:
mneeley490 posted:
bman posted:

Ferris Bueller's Day Off.

If you are feeling down in the dumps, spend a couple of hours with Ferris, it will perk you right up!

His girlfriend was hot. I wonder whatever happened to her.

Mia Sara.  Another reason to watch the film again.  

She never had much of a career but is best known for female lead to Jean-Claude Van Dam in Time Cop

Or perhaps for Legend, alongside a very young Tom Cruise

Well, she married Sean Connery’s son, divorced, then married Jim Henson’s son. 

Funny, I don’t recall her in the movie, but only watched once, I think. 

 

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