We had a somewhat lazy weekend, which was more than welcome:

- Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (enjoyed it more than I thought I would)

- Judy (movie was good but Zellweger was amazing - should walk away with the Oscar hands down)

- The Gentlemen (enjoyed it the most of the three).

wineart 2 posted:
steve8 posted:

Farewell, My Lovely

Sorry Old Man but I thought this was pretty good.



If we are talking about the ‘70’s film with Robert Mitchum, I agree. Rock solid film! 

That's the one. I thought Mitchum's narration was great.

wineart 2 posted:
steve8 posted:

Farewell, My Lovely

Sorry Old Man but I thought this was pretty good.



If we are talking about the ‘70’s film with Robert Mitchum, I agree. Rock solid film! 

I just rewatched it again (like Steve on TCM) and found the same problems I had with it in the 70s. It's just so close, yet no cigar. Some have problems with Mitchum's age. I do not, I think he makes a very good world-weary Marlowe. However the scenes with Charlotte Rampling (about 29 years his junior) don't work. There are no sparks, it's just unbelievable. There are other problems, while it is able to bring out sexual themes that the superior Farewell, My Lovely  (91pts) was unable to at the time due to censorship, it does make some odd changes. Combining  Jules Amthor and Dr. Sonderborg into an lesbian whorehouse madam whose actions really don't make sense is one strange choice. However I still like the film and give it around 82pts.

However, the less said about Mitchum's second Marlowe effort, The Big Sleep, the better. Due to the producer the movie is shot in, and takes place in, England. It never recovers from that glaring decision. However, it did make Mitchum the only actor to play Marlowe twice in films.

steve8 posted:
wineart 2 posted:
steve8 posted:

Farewell, My Lovely

Sorry Old Man but I thought this was pretty good.



If we are talking about the ‘70’s film with Robert Mitchum, I agree. Rock solid film! 

That's the one. I thought Mitchum's narration was great.

As for narration you just can't beat Dick Powell's delivery in general, like when he's drugged, "A black hole opened at my feet, I dove in." One more thing, you just can't touch the great Mike Mazurki as Moose Malloy. He also has great delivery. I think Jack O'Halloran was dubbed in FML.

The Old Man posted:

As for narration you just can't beat Dick Powell's delivery in general, like when he's drugged, "A black hole opened at my feet, I dove in."

Mitchum had a few good lines in that same scene.

"Now, let's see you do something *really* tough... like gettin' up... I crawled along the floor thinking... 'How the hell can I get under that door?"

I do agree that Charlotte Rampling didn't work.

steve8 posted:
The Old Man posted:

As for narration you just can't beat Dick Powell's delivery in general, like when he's drugged, "A black hole opened at my feet, I dove in."

Mitchum had a few good lines in that same scene.

"Now, let's see you do something *really* tough... like gettin' up... I crawled along the floor thinking... 'How the hell can I get under that door?"

I do agree that Charlotte Rampling didn't work.

Hey, I thought you have seen "Murder My Sweet." Powell delivers that line better too. And if you haven't seen it, get right on it!

The Others - 2001 - 89pts. The first time I saw this was about 15 years ago. It is such an interesting late entry in the genre of psychological ghost stories from a woman's point of view. I think the first of note is the amazing adaptation of Henry James' Turn of the Screw  The Innocents; which amazingly sticks with the book's shocking ending. A few years later Claire Bloom was haunted (?) in The Haunting - 1963.  So it was a real surprise, and worth a second visit, to see how well The Others continues this sub genre of Gothic film. Nicole Kidman's is so good as the strict mother from hell who does everything to protect her children from supernatural doings.  All three of these are shown regularly (in the correct AOR ) on TCM.

winetarelli posted:

Parasite. I really liked the first 80%. Then it got... different. 

And that's what made it great. It keeps twisting your head around in unexpected ways as it careens towards its conclusion.

Vulture has an excellent article on the film with some input from Bong Joon Ho. (All spoilers, for those who haven't seen the movie.) It's interesting that he calls it a "stairway movie."

Something of interest in general. It's concept of  the two classes are represented very much the way Kurosawa did in High and Low. The well off live on a hilltop in a modernist building and off course the low live below in squalor. FWIW, it's one of the great overlooked Kurosawa films based ,on of all things, an Ed McBain 57th Precinct novel.

For me this movie is the second best of the 21st century. And like my first best, Get Out, it found a new and unique way to talk about differences between those that have it and those that don't.

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