quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
The Post
Good acting. Liked the scenes of putting the typesetting and producing a newspaper the old fashioned way.
Generally, I thought the movie was a bit boring though. I guess I can't get excited when I know the outcome already.


Saw the Post today. Agree a bit boring. They only got the story as the NYT was prohibited from writing any more about it. A big let down...
Had a bit of a movie binge on some recent EU travel:

Three Billboards: Agree with Napacat . . . an incredible movie

Happy Death Day: enjoyed this quite a bit.

Mother: took two tries to get through it. To me, the movie is more interesting to think about after the fact than it was to watch it. I think the only reason I made it through the second time around is that I had 4 hours left on my flight and had nothing better to do. And, I say that even though I'm a fan of JLaw

Knife Skills: great documentary about the opening of a restaurant in Cleveland, staffed entirely by ex-cons

Suburbicon: entertaining flick. Generally enjoy most Matt Damon movies I have watched and Clooney seems to have done a pretty good job with social commentary

GeoStorm: If you have 10 hours to kill, and there is nothing else to do, this MIGHT be a reasonable choice to consider
quote:
Originally posted by Napacat:
Three Billboards was a much better movie. I can see that winning the Oscar.


A number of non-white reviewers, including Ira Madison in the
Daily Beast have found the movie to be "tone deaf" when it comes to race. I haven't seen the movie yet, but thought his review was a perspective worth considering.

Even more strong is Wesley Moore's piece in the New York Times.

I'm curious to hear from those who have seen the movie and have read these reviews/opinion pieces.
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
quote:
Originally posted by Napacat:
Three Billboards was a much better movie. I can see that winning the Oscar.


A number of non-white reviewers, including Ira Madison in the
Daily Beast have found the movie to be "tone deaf" when it comes to race. I haven't seen the movie yet, but thought his review was a perspective worth considering.

Even more strong is Wesley Moore's piece in the New York Times.

I'm curious to hear from those who have seen the movie and have read these reviews/opinion pieces.


I'll weigh in...read the NYT piece you linked to. Not a great review. Is it necessary to now breakdown movie reviews from white to non-white reviewers?

It is an opinion piece and they need to fill space. I disagreed with most of it. I watch a movie to be entertained...not look for social injustices.

I really enjoyed the movie.
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
quote:
Originally posted by Napacat:
Three Billboards was a much better movie. I can see that winning the Oscar.


A number of non-white reviewers, including Ira Madison in the
Daily Beast have found the movie to be "tone deaf" when it comes to race. I haven't seen the movie yet, but thought his review was a perspective worth considering.

Even more strong is Wesley Moore's piece in the New York Times.

I'm curious to hear from those who have seen the movie and have read these reviews/opinion pieces.


Read most of them, though I can't stand Wesley Morris and couldn't finish more than 30% of his article.

I didn't even think about the movie in terms of race...but then again, I'm white.

As for movie critics, I'll sometimes read reviews after the I see the movie...they're all too often very fine writers with terrible opinions and judgement.
Documentary: The Force

Riveting story about the Oakland Police department. Places the viewer inside the tumultuous city, with in-depth analysis of the internal and internal struggles their police department faces.

Difficult to imagine being a law-enforcement officer at present in general, but in Oakland specifically.

Highly recommended.
Ratatouille - watched it again. Entertaining as always, although I hadn't picked up the whole "don't steal food" theme that kept reoccurring throughout.

My favorite scene is still when the food critic, Anton Ego, tries his first bite of the ratatouille.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Ratatouille - watched it again. Entertaining as always, although I hadn't picked up the whole "don't steal food" theme that kept reoccurring throughout.

My favorite scene is still when the food critic, Anton Ego, tries his first bite of the ratatouille.


Funny... I just re-watched this last week. Liked it more this time than my previous two.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Party (1968)


love it


When we briefly discussed movies last week I was tempted to mention this one - or did I actually do so? - unsurprisingly, my memory is not strong on those evenings......
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Ratatouille - watched it again. Entertaining as always, although I hadn't picked up the whole "don't steal food" theme that kept reoccurring throughout.

My favorite scene is still when the food critic, Anton Ego, tries his first bite of the ratatouille.

Love that scene.
Red Sparrow...surprisingly enjoyable, and jlaw is very easy on the eyes (naked too!). always nice to see Jeremy Irons!

Black Panther...not sure what the critics are smoking, but this was one long tedious movie. I kept thinking of Coming to America and The Lion King. Maybe you need to be a Marvel fanboy.
The Shape of Water

Beautifully staged, shot and edited. An interesting and entertaining parable. Did it deserve best picture? Perhaps if it had been emotionally engaging, but I thought was detached and distant.

It also occurs to me that the plot is basically E.T. with adults.

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