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quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
The Post. ***1/2. Bummer that the 1/2 of the country that won't see it is the 1/2 of the country that needs to.


Don’t be so pessimistic.... only 1/3. Wink


Fake News! Wink


Big Grin. Well, we did learn today that the people in the room defending our resident racist saying he did not say Shithole actually said Shithouse. Well, I know I for one fell much better. Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
The Post. ***1/2. Bummer that the 1/2 of the country that won't see it is the 1/2 of the country that needs to.


Don’t be so pessimistic.... only 1/3. Wink


Fake News! Wink


Big Grin. Well, we did learn today that the people in the room defending our resident racist saying he did not say Shithole actually said Shithouse. Well, I know I for one fell much better. Roll Eyes

Didn't he call the White House that too? Really anything that doesn't have gold faucets is a shithouse, might as well live in a hole...
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
The Third Man

Outstanding.

The appearance of Orson Welles is one of the true magic moments in all of film.

And steve you never said if you watched Get Out on HBO. Again due to them not showing it in the correct aspect ratio (I know billhike, the horror!) you did not see around 29% of the movie. To get a sense of that click on this link to Guernica. If this was shown using HBO's aspect ratio the bull's head on the left (and all above, below--splitting in half the man's head near the bottom--and on the left) would be cut off. On the right side of the picture the entire man with the outstretched hands would be cut off.
No, Get Out is no Picasso, but it deserves to be shown properly so people can see the director's original intent.
Last edited by The Old Man
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by Wino90210:
Lady Bird...nice little coming of age movie...there seems to be one every year or two like this - but if this is "best movie" territory, the state of film is dire indeed.


Agreed.

Me also. Just this year, in this same small family dramedy genre, The Big Sick was a better film.
Last edited by winetarelli
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:

And steve you never said if you watched Get Out on HBO. Again due to them not showing it in the correct aspect ratio (I know billhike, the horror!) you did not see around 29% of the movie.


I didn't see it on HBO but I wouldn't be surprised if it was the same aspect ratio.

You're really hung up on this aren't you? While I would prefer to see a film the way the director intended it to be shown, Get Out didn't strike me as a visually compelling film. The story and plot twists are its strength.
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:


I didn't see it on HBO but I wouldn't be surprised if it was the same aspect ratio.

You're really hung up on this aren't you? While I would prefer to see a film the way the director intended it to be shown, Get Out didn't strike me as a visually compelling film. The story and plot twists are its strength.

I am absolutely hung up on this. What HBO is doing is just plain wrong. Hence the reason for my Guernica example. I consider film an equal art form with painting and I know that if they blocked off 30% of the Mona Lisa I don't think you'd have the same experience.

You say the film is not being as important a visual experience--but again you didn't see the film--you saw around 60% of it. When a group shot becomes a three shot, when two shots turn into closeups and when a very important shot of the symmetry of the exterior of the house is lost I can say you're not really seeing the movie. Film is a visual medium--shots in great movies are not accidental--they are planned. The amazing thing about Peele's accomplishment (besides the major one of discovering a new way to talk about race--not the beatings of slaves, not the standard inspiring of a black person who rises from street to being something, not a race riot movie like the recent Detroit) is his use of the camera for a first time director. There are many things happening that you can't see when a third of the movie is cut off.

Many TVs can demonstrate this for you. Put in a 2.4:1 aspect ratio DVD movie. Then while it's playing hit the zoom button. It will give you a pretty good idea of what I'm talking about. Some movies in higher aspect ratios can be missing over 40% of the frame. The weird thing is HBO does show some 2.4:1 films at the correct ratio.

Thank you for listening.
Darkest Hours...terrific film, Oldman is a lock for every major actor award this season. Works well as a companion piece to Dunkirk - I'd see Dunkirk first (and preferably in a theater).

An aside...bought an annual Moviepass card for $90 at costco...lets me see a movie EVERY day of the year for free...not sure how they will not go belly up, but a spectacular offer for those who like to see movies...best, IMHO, for those who can see movies during the week, daytime and like going solo.

I keep joking that they'll make it up in volume...just like PC!
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Originally posted by steve8:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
The White Sheik


I'd never even heard of this Fellini film. Will have to check it out sometime.

However you watch it there'd better be black bars on the left and right side of the frame. AOR is 1.37:1.

Note: Future great director Michelangelo Antonioni is credited with the story.
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Originally posted by steve8:
Murder, My Sweet

Excellent. Could be my favourite film with the Marlowe character. <preparing for lecture from TOM on why The Long Goodbye is better>

I love this movie and have seen it at least ten times over the years. Dick Powell, originally a song man, was a surprising choice to play Marlowe and it worked perfectly. (Who doesn't love the two times he dives into blackness?) I also love The Long Goodbye for its unique take on the whole genre. (Come to LA I'll show you the unique apartment complex Elliot Gould's Marlowe lived in.) However, it is Humphrey Bogart who really wears the part best. It is interesting that it's Bogart who defined two generations of California detectives, first with John Huston's fairly faithful adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon and then with Howard Hawks' version of Raymond Chandler's detective in The Big Sleep. Bogart's versions also are helped by their lead actresses, of course Lauren Bacall is the greatest ever, and the supporting characters such as Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet, Elisha Cook Jr. and many others.

The early adaptations often had to change some of Chandler's more seedy plots, for instance Geiger is a pornogogharer in the original book of The Big Sleep. Robert Mitchum played Marlowe twice in films made in the 70s which do not bury, or hint at, things that couldn't be shown in earlier versions. His first is the book that Murder my Sweet is based on, Farewell My Lovely and the second is a version of The Big Sleep. The latter oddly, and perhaps for budget reason, is set in England! Though more accurate I've never warmed to these two films.

Also of note I do enjoy James Garner in an adaptation of The Little Sister simply titled, Marlowe. It is set in the wild 60s (hippies, psychedelics, etc.) and contains Bruce Lee's wild first film role as karate kicking henchman.

Finally well worth seeking out is the early HBO series Philip Marlowe, Private Eye starring Powers Boothe. Very good adaptations of Chandler's short stories.

And that's what I know about Philip Marlowe interpreters. (You set the ball on the tee.)

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