quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Grey Gardens

Very hard to watch. Not just that they're crazy, but unrelentingly crazy and screechy.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Grey Gardens

Very hard to watch. Not just that they're crazy, but unrelentingly crazy and screechy.


TOM, You probably saw this when it was broadcast but others may find it interesting to see what Grey Gardens looks like today

Grey Gardens - CBS Sunday Morning
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Grey Gardens

Very hard to watch. Not just that they're crazy, but unrelentingly crazy and screechy.


TOM, You probably saw this when it was broadcast but others may find it interesting to see what Grey Gardens looks like today

Grey Gardens - CBS Sunday Morning


Now just a nice little $20M property. Wink
American Sniper

I read and heard a lot of polarizing reviews/comments about this film, some of which accused it of glorifying war. I don't think it did, certainly no more than a film like Saving Private Ryan. It was OK, with a good performance by Cooper.

Scandal (Shubun)

Marred by some ridiculous melodrama.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Magnificent Ambersons

I would love to have seen the original cut to compare to RKO's.

We were lucky that we essentially get to see how Welles wanted Touch of Evil to be. Unfortunately the film elements just aren't there for TMA.

Big +1 on both of your comments.

By the way, have either of you seen the TV mini-series The Spoils of Babylon? It aired sometime in the last year. It's a big, messy failure, but it was intended to be messy. It's a parody of 1970s/80s "event TV" mini-series like The Thorn Birds, but it's also a weird insider parody of Orson Welles later career. The joke is that the mini-series was produced by a washed up film director (Will Ferrell doing late-career Orson Welles from his Paul Masson commercials and his frozen pea radio commercial) who had to film it over half a dozen years because of lack of financing, and then it was shelved for many years until 2014 when he finally pieced it together for broadcast.

It's worth watching if only for Ferrell's Orson Welles impersonation in the opening and closing scene of each episode.
Last edited by sunnylea57
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
By the way, have either of you seen the TV mini-series The Spoils of Babylon? It aired sometime in the last year. It's a big, messy failure, but it was intended to be messy. It's a parody of 1970s/80s "event TV" mini-series like The Thorn Birds, but it's also a weird insider parody of Orson Welles later career. The joke is that the mini-series was produced by a washed up film director (Will Ferrell doing late-career Orson Welles from his Paul Masson commercials and his frozen pea radio commercial) who had to film it over half a dozen years because of lack of financing, and then it was shelved for many years until 2014 when he finally pieced it together for broadcast.

It's worth watching if only for Ferrell's Orson Welles impersonation in the opening and closing scene of each episode.

Wow, I almost watched that series and would certainly have found interesting the, to modern viewers, obscure reference to those sad days for Orson.

Also it might finally give me something to like Ferrell for. explode
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Wow, I almost watched that series and would certainly have found interesting the, to modern viewers, obscure reference to those sad days for Orson.

Also it might finally give me something to like Ferrell for. explode

A warning: on whole it's not very good, but it does have its moments.

Here's Ferrell as Eric Jonrosh aka Orson:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-aq8DDR1vc

And apparently there is now a sequel: The Spoils Before Dying
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56SBAefMc6s
quote:
Originally posted by Bytown Rick:
Minions 3D with my grandson. Life's simple pleasures.


Same thing for me today with my kids.

Simple is definitely an appropriate adjective.
Rear Window
The 39 Steps

Continuing my exploration of older flicks with a focus on Hitchcock

I'm discovering it's really very relaxing and pleasant to focus on plot and character development without the "distraction" of constant eye-popping CGI special effects

Finding that my movie preferences are evolving just like my wine habits are evolving. Gaining a much greater appreciation for wines/movies with age on them but still very much love young movies/wines . . . enjoy both but appreciating their differences
What's funny is Hitchcock movies are loaded with special effects, especially blue screen shots. Some are obvious, many are not. There is also a ponderous of matte screen shots in his movies. Like Frank Lloyd Wright, whose designs went beyond the construction technology of the day, Hitchcock's planned shots frequently exceeded the special effects artists toolbox.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Magnificent Ambersons

I would love to have seen the original cut to compare to RKO's.

We were lucky that we essentially get to see how Welles wanted Touch of Evil to be. Unfortunately the film elements just aren't there for TMA.

Big +1 on both of your comments.

By the way, have either of you seen the TV mini-series The Spoils of Babylon? It aired sometime in the last year. It's a big, messy failure, but it was intended to be messy. It's a parody of 1970s/80s "event TV" mini-series like The Thorn Birds, but it's also a weird insider parody of Orson Welles later career. The joke is that the mini-series was produced by a washed up film director (Will Ferrell doing late-career Orson Welles from his Paul Masson commercials and his frozen pea radio commercial) who had to film it over half a dozen years because of lack of financing, and then it was shelved for many years until 2014 when he finally pieced it together for broadcast.

It's worth watching if only for Ferrell's Orson Welles impersonation in the opening and closing scene of each episode.


Sincerely, thank you. That said, I really cannot take Ferrell.

It will take a lot to walk down that road. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Rear Window
The 39 Steps



P, for all that is still good in this world, please PLEASE tell me this was not your first viewing of these films. Big Grin
Ex Machina
Liked it a lot. Even though there are some interesting special effects, it's still sort of a minimalist movie, more psychological than CGI.

What We Do in the Shadows
I think this is the funniest movie I have seen in a long time. Two thumbs up!
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Rear Window
The 39 Steps

Continuing my exploration of older flicks with a focus on Hitchcock

I'm discovering it's really very relaxing and pleasant to focus on plot and character development without the "distraction" of constant eye-popping CGI special effects

Finding that my movie preferences are evolving just like my wine habits are evolving. Gaining a much greater appreciation for wines/movies with age on them but still very much love young movies/wines . . . enjoy both but appreciating their differences

Funny.

I re-watched The Lady Vanishes last week and I have To Catch a Thief (which I have seen many times, but not recently) in queue.

Parcival, The Lady Vanishes is old, British, Hitchcock -- a real 1938 film, I had forgotten how much social commentary about some Brits of the time it included. Some people overlook it when discussing his best work but I'd put it way up there and really suggest you watch it if you've never seen it. It is wonderful.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Rear Window
The 39 Steps



P, for all that is still good in this world, please PLEASE tell me this was not your first viewing of these films. Big Grin


W+A . . . I won't tell you that (but it was!)
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Rear Window
The 39 Steps

Continuing my exploration of older flicks with a focus on Hitchcock

I'm discovering it's really very relaxing and pleasant to focus on plot and character development without the "distraction" of constant eye-popping CGI special effects

Finding that my movie preferences are evolving just like my wine habits are evolving. Gaining a much greater appreciation for wines/movies with age on them but still very much love young movies/wines . . . enjoy both but appreciating their differences

Funny.

I re-watched The Lady Vanishes last week and I have To Catch a Thief (which I have seen many times, but not recently) in queue.

Parcival, The Lady Vanishes is old, British, Hitchcock -- a real 1938 film, I had forgotten how much social commentary about some Brits of the time it included. Some people overlook it when discussing his best work but I'd put it way up there and really suggest you watch it if you've never seen it. It is wonderful.


Thanks for the recs . . . next up in my ITunes watch-list for another cross-country flight I have in a few weeks
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Shop Around the Corner


Adding this to the queue as well if only to see how badly the adaptation, "You've Got Mail" butchered an otherwise great plot idea
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Shop Around the Corner


Adding this to the queue as well if only to see how badly the adaptation, "You've Got Mail" butchered an otherwise great plot idea

It butchered it very well.
Mr. Holmes--80pts. Bill Condon a middleweight director who gets interesting loglines--the 93 year old Sherlock Holmes attempts to figure out where an old case went wrong--but Condon doesn't have the ability to make a really great film.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Mr. Holmes--80pts. Bill Condon a middleweight director who gets interesting loglines--the 93 year old Sherlock Holmes attempts to figure out where an old case went wrong--but Condon doesn't have the ability to make a really great film.


I think of an 80 as a good movie.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Mr. Holmes--80pts. Bill Condon a middleweight director who gets interesting loglines--the 93 year old Sherlock Holmes attempts to figure out where an old case went wrong--but Condon doesn't have the ability to make a really great film.


I think of an 80 as a good movie.

Yes, though I didn't say it, it's worth a view. But to show what can be done with an interesting revisionist Holmes there's Nicholas Meyer's The Seven-Percent-Solution. I've always thought that another attempt at a Billy Wilder's own attempt The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes was one of his few failures. However it should be noted that like The Magnificent Ambersons it was edited by the studio without Wilder's consent.
Last edited by The Old Man
Into the Woods I saw the version from the 90s that was a film of the stage version. I thought my wife would like something riffing on all those Fairy Tale characters. I don't think I've heard more obnoxious music.
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
Rocky Horror - FKG won constume contest

Photos or it never happened! Big Grin
EDIT: no need for pics - C tells me they are on FB.
Last edited by vint
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Night of the Hunter

Best one time directing attempt by an actor.


I have never thought of that.

A fine film.
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
Rocky Horror - FKG won constume contest

Photos or it never happened! Big Grin
EDIT: no need for pics - C tells me they are on FB.


Yup - photos on FB and FKG's blog
- Unfinished Business -- silly, though I laughed more than I thought I would

- The Gunman -- very uneven, but damn I like Sean Penn (and Javier Bardem too)
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
A couple of Pakula films

Klute
All The President's Men


Cool ... Both from a great decade for cinema.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×