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quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Shakespeare in Love

Stoppard's ability to add to the canon of Shakespeare is beyond remarkable. Obviously, Rosencratz and Guildenstern are Dead did not translate well into a movie. But every time I come back to one of these works after a long period of time, I'm still shocked how wonderfully he was able to meld his world with that of Shakespeare's.

Gwyneth at her best, too.


x2
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Shakespeare in Love

Stoppard's ability to add to the canon of Shakespeare is beyond remarkable. Obviously, Rosencratz and Guildenstern are Dead did not translate well into a movie. But every time I come back to one of these works after a long period of time, I'm still shocked how wonderfully he was able to meld his world with that of Shakespeare's.

Gwyneth at her best, too.


x2


X3
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


Whether you liked the movie itself or not, any man who didn't cry toward the end of Marley & Me just doesn't have a soul...


+1. I simply lost it at the end of that movie.
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


I never seen Hachi, don't remember crying with Rudy, and it's been a long time since I've seen Field of Dreams. The movie that slways chokes me up at the ending is It's a Wonderful Life.


Ditto Hachi.
My Life as a Dog
Courage of Lassie (Lassie is a decorated WWII vet with PTSD, although they didn't call it that back then)
Fluke
Dean Spanley

I've a soft spot for dog movies
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


I never seen Hachi, don't remember crying with Rudy, and it's been a long time since I've seen Field of Dreams. The movie that slways chokes me up at the ending is It's a Wonderful Life.


Ditto Hachi.
My Life as a Dog
Courage of Lassie (Lassie is a decorated WWII vet with PTSD, although they didn't call it that back then)
Fluke
Dean Spanley

I've a soft spot for dog movies

Oh, lord, any of those. How about My Dog Skip, or any of the Lassie movies or TV series.
I can remember watching Lassie as a small child, when at the end of every show, she and the park ranger who was searching for her would miss each other by only a few seconds, and I would be crying, "No, Lassie! Turn around! Go the other way!"

For the original tear jerker, there is, of course, Ol' Yeller.
As Phoebe on Friends once exclaimed, "What kind of sick, doggy snuff film is this?!?"
Pacific Rim

The best possible monsters vs. robots movie imaginable. Also, it is a monsters vs. robots movie.

Or, as one reviewer put it: "This is THE robots vs. monsters movie you wanted Guillermo del Toro to make... if you wanted him to make a robots vs. monsters movie"

Film fan boys should see it. It certainly appeals to the 14 year old boy in one. It is creative (within the context) and it is a lesson in how to make a movie like this. eg. All of the fighting sequences make sense -- you always know where each robot is, where each monster is, where they are in relation to one another, what has just happened, etc. It isn't like the other crap where things just go flying and appear out of nowhere and disappear inexplicably, etc. In certain regards, while I don't think it is quite as good, it evokes Spielberg's Jurassic Park in that sense; within its own self-contained world, what is going on makes sense and is consistent.

Most fanboy-ish, of course, is that Guillermo del Toro directed (and co-wrote... in this case I think meaning lots of script doctoring) it. Since Pan's Labyrinth he has been just about the most sought after director in the industry. (BTW: If you haven't seen Pan's Labyrinth put that next in your queue... just a freakishly creative, wonderful and compelling movie.) And his artistic and creative vision is already legendary. (2015/2016 cannot arrive fast enough for me to see his dark, gothic, "definitive" live action re-telling of Beauty and the Beast.)

Overall, I would give the movie a flat B, but with the proviso that it is interesting, creative, and well executed enough that I would encourage people to see it. Try to see it in Imax, but regular 2D is great, too. (Apparently, it is too dark in regular 3D.) B
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Pacific Rim

The best possible monsters vs. robots movie imaginable. Also, it is a monsters vs. robots movie.

Or, as one reviewer put it: "This is THE robots vs. monsters movie you wanted Guillermo del Toro to make... if you wanted him to make a robots vs. monsters movie"

Film fan boys should see it. It certainly appeals to the 14 year old boy in one. It is creative (within the context) and it is a lesson in how to make a movie like this. eg. All of the fighting sequences make sense -- you always know where each robot is, where each monster is, where they are in relation to one another, what has just happened, etc. It isn't like the other crap where things just go flying and appear out of nowhere and disappear inexplicably, etc. In certain regards, while I don't think it is quite as good, it evokes Spielberg's Jurassic Park in that sense; within its own self-contained world, what is going on makes sense and is consistent.

Most fanboy-ish, of course, is that Guillermo del Toro directed (and co-wrote... in this case I think meaning lots of script doctoring) it. Since Pan's Labyrinth he has been just about the most sought after director in the industry. (BTW: If you haven't seen Pan's Labyrinth put that next in your queue... just a freakishly creative, wonderful and compelling movie.) And his artistic and creative vision is already legendary. (2015/2016 cannot arrive fast enough for me to see his dark, gothic, "definitive" live action re-telling of Beauty and the Beast.)

Overall, I would give the movie a flat B, but with the proviso that it is interesting, creative, and well executed enough that I would encourage people to see it. Try to see it in Imax, but regular 2D is great, too. (Apparently, it is too dark in regular 3D.) B

Just a couple of corrections: You can't be a co-writer and script doctor--you never will see the name of a script doctor on the screen.

While I am a big del Toro fan he could never be called, "just about the most sought after director in the industry." He's never had a big hit and his films are too eclectic.

I think this is pretty well summed up at Box Office Mojo
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


Whether you liked the movie itself or not, any man who didn't cry toward the end of Marley & Me just doesn't have a soul...


Haven't seen it but if it something to do with a dog dying, I wouldn't cry. No affinity towards pets. Hate going to 'dog people's houses. I always end up needing to change my clothes.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Pacific Rim

The best possible monsters vs. robots movie imaginable. Also, it is a monsters vs. robots movie.

Or, as one reviewer put it: "This is THE robots vs. monsters movie you wanted Guillermo del Toro to make... if you wanted him to make a robots vs. monsters movie"

Film fan boys should see it. It certainly appeals to the 14 year old boy in one. It is creative (within the context) and it is a lesson in how to make a movie like this. eg. All of the fighting sequences make sense -- you always know where each robot is, where each monster is, where they are in relation to one another, what has just happened, etc. It isn't like the other crap where things just go flying and appear out of nowhere and disappear inexplicably, etc. In certain regards, while I don't think it is quite as good, it evokes Spielberg's Jurassic Park in that sense; within its own self-contained world, what is going on makes sense and is consistent.

Most fanboy-ish, of course, is that Guillermo del Toro directed (and co-wrote... in this case I think meaning lots of script doctoring) it. Since Pan's Labyrinth he has been just about the most sought after director in the industry. (BTW: If you haven't seen Pan's Labyrinth put that next in your queue... just a freakishly creative, wonderful and compelling movie.) And his artistic and creative vision is already legendary. (2015/2016 cannot arrive fast enough for me to see his dark, gothic, "definitive" live action re-telling of Beauty and the Beast.)

Overall, I would give the movie a flat B, but with the proviso that it is interesting, creative, and well executed enough that I would encourage people to see it. Try to see it in Imax, but regular 2D is great, too. (Apparently, it is too dark in regular 3D.) B

Just a couple of corrections: You can't be a co-writer and script doctor--you never will see the name of a script doctor on the screen.

While I am a big del Toro fan he could never be called, "just about the most sought after director in the industry." He's never had a big hit and his films are too eclectic.

I think this is pretty well summed up at Box Office Mojo


I know nothing is ever quick in the movie industry, so maybe it is just that all del Toro's movies are in post production, holding patterns, etc., but from what I could find this is only the second release since Pan's Labyrinth that he's directed -- the other coming out in 2008. He has plenty of producer credits, so is he the "most sought out director in the business" who just doesn't accept jobs?
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Don't take this too personally, but if someone doesn't like dogs (in general), I wonder about them...
I’m kind of the same way as Adam10 (never thought I would say that!). It’s not that I don’t like dogs, I think puppy’s are cute and all that, but I just have never had any real feelings for dogs or any other pets like others do. My mom loves to tell this story. I was like 10 years old and my parents surprised me with a dog. They put me in the backyard with the dog and a ball and I threw the ball a few times and the dog chased after it. After about 5 mins of that I picked up my ball and start walking over to my neighbors house and my mom and dad yell “where are you going”? I turned and simply said “I’m going to play with Billy, when I throw the ball with him he can catch it and throw it back”. That pretty much sums how I have always felt about pets. Does that say something about me? I don’t know, but it is what it is. If our little girl wants a pet she will have to play with her grandparent’s dog!

I should add that it’s not like I don’t care about animals. For instance, I could never go hunting. You couldn’t pay me to shoot an animal and take its life. It would just crush me. The only way I could potentially do it is if I knew we were going to use all the meat and even then I’m not sure I could pull the trigger.
quote:
While I am a big del Toro fan he could never be called, "just about the most sought after director in the industry." He's never had a big hit and his films are too eclectic.


The reason I put it like that was he was tapped to direct The Hobbit and spent years of his life working on it, then bowed out. This. Crimson Peak and Beauty and the Beast both of which WB is rumored to be paying huge sums of money for and giving del Toro final cut (likely 'R' rating).

When a studio has a director-less moderately-big to very-big budget project, that they want to be good, especially roughly related to the fantasy genre, I cannot think of another director they go to first right now.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
City Lights, ( Chaplin)


Great movie. Took a film class freshman year of college titled something like Comedy in Film. The first third of the course we watched silent films -- Chaplin, Keaton, Harold Lloyd. In addition to watching some classic films by/with great comedians, I credit watching and enjoying those silent classics with changing me from someone who didn't like subtitled foreign films to someone who does. Might have also just been my maturation process, but I really believe watching those silent films were a big part of it.
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Let's see a list of "Movies that Tough Guys can Cry to"

I'll get it started:

Field of Dreams
Rudy
Hachi


Whether you liked the movie itself or not, any man who didn't cry toward the end of Marley & Me just doesn't have a soul...


+1. I simply lost it at the end of that movie.


I refuse to watch the movie becuase I know I would do the same.

I'd add Braveheart to the list.

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