I looked up the old marinade thread, and had forgotten that it had been locked. Here's one that was given to me by a friend this weekend. It comes from Jenny Kwak's:

Dok Suni: Recipes from My Mother's Korean Kitchen

Absolutely fantastic. If you've had Bulgogi or Kalbi at a Korean restaurant and have wondered how to replicate the sweet and smoky marinade used in these dishes, well, here it is:

For each pound of meat:

2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 piece of fresh kiwi - juiced in a blender
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons dark sesame oil (not the clear stuff)
2 teaspoons crushed garlic
1 tablespoon rice wine
Pinch of black pepper

Sprinkle brown sugar over all surfaces of meat. I rubbed it in a little bit. Let rest for 10 minutes.

Juice the kiwi and massage the liquid into all surfaces of the meat. I know, I know.... it sounds strange, but this is absolutely magical. The tenderizing effect of this fruit juice is unbelievable. The meat was falling apart on the grill, is was so tender.

Mix the remaining ingredients and pour over meat in a glass baking pan and cover. Marinade for a couple hours, at least. WARNING! Apparently the effect of the kiwi is so powerful that some people have experienced "overtenderization" of their meat. Don't overdo it!

Grill on VERY hot grill to taste.

This was served with steamed white Asian rice and grilled vegetable kebabs. Mahhhvelous.

Any more marinades?

PH
Original Post
You're welcomed, Bella!

This stuff is so good it would probably taste great on a grilled shoe! That being said, I've never really marinated a pork chop before. I'd be interested in how it comes out if you try it, though. I'd recommend starting with a flank steak or hangar steak if you can, since this marinade was specifically created for beef. Either that or get some short ribs and make Kalbi!!

PH
Sounds very good, PH, but I wouldn't use it on a hanger steak which is already tender and flavorful. It ought to be great on a sirloin or shell steak.
quote:
I looked up the old marinade thread, and had forgotten that it had been locked.



That Francis was a firecracker, wasn't he?

Board-O, I was thinking a sirloin myself.
Board-O & spo,

I'd love to hear how this works for you with some other cuts. Frankly, the hangar was absolutely fantabulous with this marinade. I let the mix sit 3 hours, and it was perfect. Just enough texture and "chew" factor, without becoming flabby.

re: Francis - I'd actually forgotten the lad, until I visited this thread. A feisty fella he was, indeed!

PH
To add to the marinades:

For beef fajitas:
Chopped cilantro
Beer (not light beer)
Pepper
Garlic

For lamb chops:
Soy sauce
Pepper
Rosemary
Splash of orange juice
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
I looked up the old marinade thread, and had forgotten that it had been locked. Here's one that was given to me by a friend this weekend. It comes from Jenny Kwak's:

Dok Suni: Recipes from My Mother's Korean Kitchen

Absolutely fantastic. If you've had Bulgogi or Kalbi at a Korean restaurant and have wondered how to replicate the sweet and smoky marinade used in these dishes, well, here it is:

For each pound of meat:

2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 piece of fresh kiwi - juiced in a blender
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons dark sesame oil (not the clear stuff)
2 teaspoons crushed garlic
1 tablespoon rice wine
Pinch of black pepper

Sprinkle brown sugar over all surfaces of meat. I rubbed it in a little bit. Let rest for 10 minutes.

Juice the kiwi and massage the liquid into all surfaces of the meat. I know, I know.... it sounds strange, but this is absolutely magical. The tenderizing effect of this fruit juice is unbelievable. The meat was falling apart on the grill, is was so tender.

Mix the remaining ingredients and pour over meat in a glass baking pan and cover. Marinade for a couple hours, at least. WARNING! Apparently the effect of the kiwi is so powerful that some people have experienced "overtenderization" of their meat. Don't overdo it!

Grill on VERY hot grill to taste.

I made this marinade for 1.18 pound of flank steak. I used 1 entire kiwi and pureed in a blender to make it part of the marinade. Marinaded for 48 hours. Smell was to die for on the grill. Tastes good...but for some reason, the marinade didn't soak through to the middle of the steak.
Purplehaze,
I am definately going to try it, it sounds great. I am thinking a sirloin and maybe a tri-tip. I will report the results.
Hey Bella,

The kiwi paste is to be massaged into the meat over several minutes PRIOR to the balance of the marinade being added. The kiwi is supposed to act alone, solely as a tenderization element according to the source who pointed this recipe out to me.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
Hey Bella,
The kiwi paste is to be massaged into the meat over several minutes PRIOR to the balance of the marinade being added. The kiwi is supposed to act alone, solely as a tenderization element according to the source who pointed this recipe out to me.
PH


Does it work as well as autotenderization?
Purplehaze,

I have acquired all my ingredients.

I will try this tomorrow on 3lbs of Top Sirloin and let you know how it turns out.

If I do not like the leftover Sake (Rice Wine) for drinking can I just leave it in the refrigerator for cooking, or will it oxidize like other wines?

The over tenderization you were talking about only occurs if too muck kiwi is used right? I was considering marinating these tonight and having them for dinner tomorrow, would that be too long in the marinade?
Hey SPO!

Can't tell you about the "over" tenderized factor, as I've never done this as an overnight marinade. I'd stick with the recipe if you can, but if you had to do this overnight, I'm sure it'll proabaly be OK. Let us know how it works out in any event.

Same deal on the sake, sorry. I'd guess it would survive in the fridge for a couple weeks for cooking purposes if well sealed, but this is just a guess. I've never kept sake for much more than a week without either using it or drinking it.

PH
You can NOT overtenderize...I have tried this recipe 3 times...twice on beef and once on chicken...and ALL times I have put twice the amount of kiwi and marinaded for 2 days.
One of the most frequently used meat tenderizers is papain derived from papaya. However, papain is disadvantageous in that it is hard to control in tenderization (i.e., control over the progress of tenderization to a proper level) and its use is restricted by the added amount thereof and the processing time. In fact, papain was subjected to meat tenderization test. As a result, even when used in an amount as extremely small as 0.1 based on the weight of the meat to be tested, this enzyme overtenderized the meat within 1 hour at room temperature and in a period of time as short as 24 hours at a temperature as low as 4.degree. C. The meat thus overtenderized was too unsavory to be served. This is because proteases derived from plants have a low substrate specificity. Other proteases such as bromelin derived from pineapple and actinidin derived kiwi fruit exhibit similar tenderizing properties.
PurpleHaze,
I like it. I used Top Sirloin. I know what you mean by falling apart on the grill. Next time I think I am going to make kebobs though. I think I am going to grill up some pineapple, tomatoes, red onions and zuchini to go along with it. Very nice, thanks.

By the way, the steaks were thicker in some parts than others. Some of the steak was medium rare while some was medium well. The medium well was slightly over tenderized. I did like the recipe said and only had it in the marinade for a little over two hours. So with this marinade it is especially important not to overcook, my bad.

Nothing smells better than sesame oil, huh?
spo1977,

Glad you enjoyed it. I particularly like that this marinade can be done kind of "at the last minute" as far as marinated meat goes. The smell of meat grilled after soaking in this stuff would make a vegerarian have second thoughts. Big Grin

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
The smell of meat grilled after soaking in this stuff would make a vegerarian have second thoughts.

Actually no second thoughts. You can throw a couple of slabs of good, fresh, firm tofu in this stuff and grill them up real nice and tasty.
quote:
You can throw a couple of slabs of good, fresh, firm tofu in this stuff and grill them up real nice and tasty.


Uh....let me know how that works out for you, Mav! I think you could probably skip the kiwi/tenderizer part. Wouldn't want your tofu too tender. Razz

PH
I imagine any dry white wine would get the job done. Being an Asian dish, the sake would be preferrable. Are you having trouble finding it?

PH
I could probably find some, but we just don't drink any white wine at my house. After using a tablespoon for the recipe, I'm pretty sure the rest of the bottle would die a slow death in the fridge. Frown
Use any dry white wine. Borrow a tablespoon from a neighbor! I imagine you could use "cooking" wine, but I avoid this whenever possible.

PH

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