Loving Red Zin

Absolutely, Zins are great. One of my favorites right now (with a low Wine spectator score although i don't know why) is Ridge's Paso Robles 2005. This wine's fruit is sourced from Dusi Ranch, which also happens to be another great wine that's only available at the winery, 2005 Dusi Ranch.
I like the Dusi Ranch Ridge as well, but haven't had the 2005. In fact, I've never had a bad Ridge Zin. They're really good. Who cares what the scores are, if you like it, drink it.

jmblooz,

Give Petite Sirah a try. The flavors can be similar to Zinfandel, but PS is typically less "peppery," and usually much more tannic and lush. I love Petite Sirah, it's one of my favorite grapes, and am glad it's under the radar. You get a lot for your money, IMO. Give Bogle or Concannon a try. They are decent entry level PS. Or, pay extra for a Girard, EOS, or Rosenblum (about $25-ish).
jmblooz - uh, red zin? It's a red grape so unless they take the skins off and make it into a rose, it's always red.

But you need to be more specific about the zin you like. It's one of the most versatile grapes. Some of them are made in a bright, fruity, grapey style. Some of them are made in a "claret" kind of style, and some are made in a uniquely zin over the top style.

Depending on where the grape is grown and how it's treated, you get really different kinds of zin.

So for the first, you can try Sobon - they make an inexpensive, really tasty, fruity one. A little bit lighter-bodied than most, not a lot of wood or alcohol and it's a food-friendly wine. It's not like pinot noir, but in terms of body weight, color, etc., I compare it to a PN.

For the second, you can try something by Ridge - they are probably more responsible than anyone for the respect given zin today. For an inexpensive one, the Three Valleys is a must buy that shows all the character you want in a zin. that's an example of what I meant by claret style - there's more tannin than the other, although it's not a dry and hard wine, and there's structure underlying the fruit.

From there, zin goes on its own trajectory. Because of the way the grapes ripen, the winemakers usually want to ensure complete ripeness of all grapes, which means over ripeness of some. These start to be their own category of wine almost. Not quite Port, but not in the same league as say a Barolo.

So you can get something from Seghesio say, their Old Vines or Home Ranch or some such. It's a bigger wine with notes of tar and jammy fruit and lots of alcohol. And you can get into the Turleys or the Earthquake zin that I believe clocks in at somewhere around 16% alcohol - just huge massive fruit more than anything. For all that, it's not a bad wine at all. But hard to believe it's the same grape as the Sobon.

Petite sirah is often added to zin because it has more tannins and more color. In terms of grape comparisons, i'm not so sure. The bigger zins are like the Australian Barossa shirazes more than anything IMO - no real varietal distinction, dark, fruity, and thick.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
jmblooz - uh, red zin? It's a red grape so unless they take the skins off and make it into a rose, it's always red.


I guess it will come as news to you that more white Zinfandel is produced than red Zinfandel. If you had known that, I'm sure you wouldn't have given jmblooz a hard time about the use of the term "red Zinfandel." As always, I'm happy to help.
As mentioned here, Ridge and Seghesio are always good. There is also Robert Biale, but you may not be able to find that in stores. They do have a website that you can go on and join their "list".

For my money, at least with Zin, Biale and Ridge are absolutly unparalleled.
quote:
Originally posted by jmblooz:
I love red zin and I am looking for info on peoples favorite zins, and what is another wine that may be similar?

Thanks for all the info in the past


jmblooz,

Good post. Zin is a wine that I have not tried and will take up some of the suggestions by the fellas.
quote:
I guess it will come as news to you that more white Zinfandel is produced than red Zinfandel. If you had known that, I'm sure you wouldn't have given jmblooz a hard time about the use of the term "red Zinfandel." As always, I'm happy to help.


Board-o - Wasn't actually giving him a hard time. Like you, I made an assumption, probably wrong. My assumption was that if someone bothers to term it "red" zinfandel and ask for information, that's what he wants.

Incidentally, you might be interested to know that as I pointed out, the white zin is in fact produced from the "red zin" grapes! In fact, it's generally even pink, not really white. Pretty wild huh?

But of course I for one much appreciate your thought-provoking, albeit irrelevant, contribution.

Cheers.
quote:
Originally posted by Sancho Panza:
Zin is a wine that I have not tried and will take up some of the suggestions by the fellas.


Sancho,

You haven't tried Zin??? You're in for a treat, it's out of favor with a lot on these boards, because most don't age well. Peppery, dusty, plums, blackberries, and usually low in tannins, for early consumption, and easy sipping with or without food. There's lots to like with these wines, but they can be quite hot (high alcohol). Post some notes when you try some to let us know how it goes.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:

Sancho,

You haven't tried Zin??? You're in for a treat, it's out of favor with a lot on these boards, because most don't age well. Peppery, dusty, plums, blackberries, and usually low in tannins, for early consumption, and easy sipping with or without food. There's lots to like with these wines, but they can be quite hot (high alcohol). Post some notes when you try some to let us know how it goes.


indybob,

Yep, never have; but I will look up some that Dusi Ranch Ridge. Similarly, I have not tried a Petite Sirah. Hey ib, what do you mean by lush when you describe the PS?
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
jmblooz - uh, red zin? It's a red grape so unless they take the skins off and make it into a rose, it's always red.

But you need to be more specific about the zin you like. It's one of the most versatile grapes. Some of them are made in a bright, fruity, grapey style. Some of them are made in a "claret" kind of style, and some are made in a uniquely zin over the top style.

Depending on where the grape is grown and how it's treated, you get really different kinds of zin.

So for the first, you can try Sobon - they make an inexpensive, really tasty, fruity one. A little bit lighter-bodied than most, not a lot of wood or alcohol and it's a food-friendly wine. It's not like pinot noir, but in terms of body weight, color, etc., I compare it to a PN.

For the second, you can try something by Ridge - they are probably more responsible than anyone for the respect given zin today. For an inexpensive one, the Three Valleys is a must buy that shows all the character you want in a zin. that's an example of what I meant by claret style - there's more tannin than the other, although it's not a dry and hard wine, and there's structure underlying the fruit.

From there, zin goes on its own trajectory. Because of the way the grapes ripen, the winemakers usually want to ensure complete ripeness of all grapes, which means over ripeness of some. These start to be their own category of wine almost. Not quite Port, but not in the same league as say a Barolo.

So you can get something from Seghesio say, their Old Vines or Home Ranch or some such. It's a bigger wine with notes of tar and jammy fruit and lots of alcohol. And you can get into the Turleys or the Earthquake zin that I believe clocks in at somewhere around 16% alcohol - just huge massive fruit more than anything. For all that, it's not a bad wine at all. But hard to believe it's the same grape as the Sobon.

Petite sirah is often added to zin because it has more tannins and more color. In terms of grape comparisons, i'm not so sure. The bigger zins are like the Australian Barossa shirazes more than anything IMO - no real varietal distinction, dark, fruity, and thick.


GregT,

This is good info man. Thanks.
quote:
Originally posted by Sancho Panza:
Hey ib, what do you mean by lush when you describe the PS?



The textbook answer is that lush is reserved for sweeter dessert wines, to describe the residual sugar. But, as I'm not a by the book guy, I use "lush" to describe a wine that has a very rich and huge mouthfeel, with gobs of good rich dark fruit, and intense color. You'll hear the word "extracted," a lot to mean the same thing.

A hallmark of good Petite Sirah is enormous dark rich fruit, delicious. Delicious like jamming a basket of unwashed blackberries and blueberries in your mouth all at once, topped off with a couple of spoons of plum jam. I think of Pinot Noir as kind of the anti-lush, anti-Petite Sirah.

PS isn't for everyone, and it's usually a love it or hate it kind of wine.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:


The textbook answer is that lush is reserved for sweeter dessert wines, to describe the residual sugar. But, as I'm not a by the book guy, I use "lush" to describe a wine that has a very rich and huge mouthfeel, with gobs of good rich dark fruit, and intense color. You'll hear the word "extracted," a lot to mean the same thing.

A hallmark of good Petite Sirah is enormous dark rich fruit, delicious. Delicious like jamming a basket of unwashed blackberries and blueberries in your mouth all at once, topped off with a couple of spoons of plum jam. I think of Pinot Noir as kind of the anti-lush, anti-Petite Sirah.

PS isn't for everyone, and it's usually a love it or hate it kind of wine.


Thanks ib; always helpful man.
quote:
Gee. You don't say. Next you're gonna tell me Blanc de Noir is made from red grapes.

Nope.

Unless you trolled this thread yourself, the question seemed to be a legit question about zin. Thus, trumpeting something irrelevant wouldn't be my first inclination. But please, look up something else to share! Learning is something I wholeheartedly encourage.

Cheers.
I like Rosenblum Zin's. The house signature seems to me volatile acidity, but it is at a level that I like, it gives it a menthol sort of aspect to it, and when there are chocolate notes to boot, it is really good.

If you like Zin, I would also recommend Sirah from California growers. I know there is a ton of the Aussie stuff out there, but try the CA grown. It may cost a bit more, but it is very good. Names such as Qupe, Rosenblum again...
Posted by Boardo -
quote:
the question seemed to be a legit question about zin.

I have no doubt it was legitimate.

Thus, trumpeting something irrelevant wouldn't be my first inclination.

It was.


I guess it's a reading comprehension issue. That's OK. Some people have difficulty with using words to convey ideas.

So when someone says: " I am looking for info on peoples favorite zins, and what is another wine that may be similar responding with a few suggestions seemed on point.

Responding with a note about production statistics? OK. Sure. That's relevant. Whatever.

The inability to add anything of value to any conversation? Well, gestures can be a powerful form of communication too. Pointing to the banana you want has apparently worked so far.

Cheers!

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