Letting wine rest after transport

If you don't mind the sediment from older reds, then as soon as you get to your destination. If you do mind, then 3 days to let the dust settle.

If there is any truth to the notion that a wine goes into shock for weeks from being jostled around, my palate sure isn't sophisticated enough to tell the difference.
I don't have any scientific evidence to back this up, but I took 6 very nice bottles with me on my honeymoon years ago in Hawaii, and all of them tasted flat, muted and not very good. Several of them I'd had before. Maybe it was the humidity affecting my tastes, maybe I had an unreal stretch of 6 corked bottles...

I just don't risk it anymore and, because it's not hard to do, leave everything shipped to me for around 3 months or so before opening.
Again, why risk it?!? Drink something else!
I'm with Unctuous . . . for "superstition" more than anything, I don't drink any of the wines for a week after I get them . . . but after that, they're all good as far as I can tell.

Haven't done a formal comparison but haven't been turned off by wines that did not have a good rest after transport
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I haven't noticed a problem with young wines. I don't buy older wines.


Likewise. And we have our former Chicago Wine Mafia come to visit us and bring bottles with them. Never been a problem, as far as I can tell.
Haven't noticed a problem w younger wines either. And if it really is an issue, then it would be hard to do offlines in places like NY, where the wines end up on subways and taxis and get nicely shaken.

But I think it depends a bit on the wine. If it's an older wine with a lot of sediment, or any wine with a lot of sediment really, and you shake it to hell, you simply redistribute that sediment in the wine. I've had Rioja from the 60s that was just off the plane and it was pretty tasty, but that wine tends not to have loads of sediment. A Barolo or Bordeaux, I don't know. But I've had those schlepped to distant locales and they were also pretty good, although sometimes a bit cloudy.

It's like the idea of standing something in the cellar if you do that. Some people think that the fine tannins in something like Barolo take longer to settle out than those in something else, and that those impart a bitterness that you avoid if you don't disturb them.

Not my theory tho, and I haven't done side by side comparisons to find out.
Quick update . . . I did as close to a side-by-side comparison as I could to test out this "letting wine rest" theory.

I ordered a 6-pack of 1998 Barbaresco. For some reason, the wine arrived in two separate 3-pack parcels almost a month apart. Last night, we opened a bottle that had been resting for a full month in my temp and humidity controlled cellar and a bottle that had just arrived to my work address that day (right off the UPS truck). None of us could discern any noticeable difference.

This is an n of 1 of course, and I still plan to let bottles rest a little, perhaps out of superstition. But, this "experiment" at least suggested that this may not be necessary
I can't say I notice anything in particular to support bottle shock due to transport. I open bottles on a regular basis on the same night after a 14 hour flight and mostly of wines 18 years or older. They usually show as expected, no harm no foul.
quote:
Originally posted by pyang:
I can't say I notice anything in particular to support bottle shock due to transport. I open bottles on a regular basis on the same night after a 14 hour flight and mostly of wines 18 years or older. They usually show as expected, no harm no foul.



I wish I could say I've had the same results, but I usually notice a pretty big difference, especially with older bottles.
Not only are the wines not nearly as clear, but it takes longer for the nose to develop, and the flavors seem a little muted to me.
'83 Margaux is a wine I love and know fairly well; bottles I've flown with, or had shipped but didn't allow enough time to stand/rest have never shown as well as ones I've had at home.
And since they're from the same cases, stored exactly the same way, I have to assume it's some type of bottle-shock from being jostled around
in travel.
Actually, I have a pretty good opportunity to test this again next week: for my parents 50th anniversary, I Fed-Ex'd a case and a half of '63s* back east last month, where they've been standing in a cellar.
The guest list grew, and now I'll need to bring a few more bottles on the flight with me.
Exact same wines, stored the same way, hopefully they'll show as well.
I'll let you know.

* mostly vintage port- Taylor, Graham's and Fonseca, and some old CA cabs- BV GdL, Krug VS, and Inglenook Estate.
quote:
Originally posted by kid lightning:
quote:
Originally posted by pyang:
I can't say I notice anything in particular to support bottle shock due to transport. I open bottles on a regular basis on the same night after a 14 hour flight and mostly of wines 18 years or older. They usually show as expected, no harm no foul.



I wish I could say I've had the same results, but I usually notice a pretty big difference, especially with older bottles.
Not only are the wines not nearly as clear, but it takes longer for the nose to develop, and the flavors seem a little muted to me.
'83 Margaux is a wine I love and know fairly well; bottles I've flown with, or had shipped but didn't allow enough time to stand/rest have never shown as well as ones I've had at home.
And since they're from the same cases, stored exactly the same way, I have to assume it's some type of bottle-shock from being jostled around
in travel.
Actually, I have a pretty good opportunity to test this again next week: for my parents 50th anniversary, I Fed-Ex'd a case and a half of '63s* back east last month, where they've been standing in a cellar.
The guest list grew, and now I'll need to bring a few more bottles on the flight with me.
Exact same wines, stored the same way, hopefully they'll show as well.
I'll let you know.

* mostly vintage port- Taylor, Graham's and Fonseca, and some old CA cabs- BV GdL, Krug VS, and Inglenook Estate.


I can't seem to locate my invitation...can you resend, please?!
Well, the verdict is in.
At least for me Wink
I brought another bottle of '63 Graham's and 2 '63 BV GdL, and
there was absolutely no comparison between those and the ones I'd sent a month or so earlier.
The ones that had been standing up were brighter, clearer and the nose took shape much faster than those I'd flown with.
They also tasted better.
Even the non-wine loving relatives gravitated toward the bottles that had been shipped earlier.
If you want your old wines to show their best, let them stand for a decent period of time.

*on a completely random note- the WOTN came out of nowhere to completely bowl over the '63 Taylor, which had been leading up til then:
1963 Charles Krug Burgundy.
I'm not sure how much (if any) actual Pinot Noir was in this "Burgundy", but it was absolutely delicious.
And crazy dark. My guess is it was largely petite sirah and syrah, with a little gamay thrown in.
Of all the wines tasted over the weekend, this one was the most surprising.

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