Hi i'm new and i have a doubt with when let breathe a wine, i'm from Venezuela and i drink almost only south-american wine, the wine are varietals and i wonder if all of this wine i have to let breathe, mostly my doubt came from the red wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Carmenere all of this between 2002 and 2007, i don't now if i have to let then breathe or drink directly from the bottle.

P.D. I try to find the subject but i fail doing it, so excuse me if this subject is already on the forum.
Original Post
Actually not all wine does need breathing or "airing" as some will refer it to. Many variables actually. Young, quality and/or denser grapes ie: cabernet, merlot, or quality blends like Bordeaux may need it, but not all of those even need it. Quality means a lot. A cheap or lower quality wine will not need airing. In fact , it will probably only get worse.
Smile

Search for a specific wine here that you have had or want to have (name, year, type) and you can get better feedback to specific wines. Breathing time also varies and your palate is a big factor. It's a very general area and there is no 1 universal answer.

Cheers
quote:
Originally posted by Juan C. Calabria G. :
quote:
i don't now if i have to let then breathe or drink directly from the bottle.

P.D. I try to find the subject but i fail doing it, so excuse me if this subject is already on the forum.


I usually just drink directly from the bottle, if I'm out and about, I do place the bottle in a brown paper bag. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Juan C. Calabria G.:
je je sorry i didn't meant that, but you already know, good joke.


JCCG,

It sounds like you have a gracious sense of humor. Welcome man!!! Hey, it's not everyday that I get to talk to a live Hugo Chavez Venezuelan. (No offense intended, if perceived as such.) Anyway, how are things over there?
well politics ahh, my personal point of view is that i survive everyday to the humiliation of have a president like Mr. Chavéz, he don't know what diplomatics is, and i can't stand his speechs, (i apologize for all the insults to your country), i travel almost every summer and some christmas to florida and realy enjoy of your country, and it's very sad that i feel better in your country than in mine.

my advice is appreciate your freedom and never let anybody threat it.
quote:
Originally posted by Juan C. Calabria G.:
well politics ahh, my personal point of view is that i survive everyday to the humiliation of have a president like Mr. Chavéz, he don't know what diplomatics is, and i can't stand his speechs, (i apologize for all the insults to your country), i travel almost every summer and some christmas to florida and realy enjoy of your country, and it's very sad that i feel better in your country than in mine.

my advice is appreciate your freedom and never let anybody threat it.


i love the one where he suggested to change the national flag because it's turning the wrong way, something about a horse should look forward to the future and not to the left towards the past all because of his daughter's suggestion.

Sorry on topic, Hunter is indeed correct that some needs need it and some wines don't.

Best way unfortunately is to just try it when you open a bottle. If it's good drink it, if it's not air it out and see what happens, a few good swirl would do the trick.
thanks for the welcome, i realy love the webpage i learn a lot in only one week and the forums are great, i can´t wait to get my first wine spectator magazine.

g-man, the speeches of Chavéz are passionate and speak of dreams but are mindless, there are things that should be but for the moments it can´t be, politics are hard i never take that job.
quote:
Originally posted by Juan C. Calabria G.:
thanks for the welcome, i realy love the webpage i learn a lot in only one week and the forums are great, i can´t wait to get my first wine spectator magazine.

g-man, the speeches of Chavéz are passionate and speak of dreams but are mindless, there are things that should be but for the moments it can´t be, politics are hard i never take that job.


Juan,

You’re absolutely right about his speeches. I heard him speak on “CSPAN” cable television -- at the United Nations. If one does not have one’s critical thinking cap on, he can rapture one with his impassioned and eloquent rhetoric. I was sharing with my lady (wife) about the persuasive nature of his discourse. Of course, from Spanish to English, the force of his delivery is lost in translation. Nonetheless, I’ve gathered from your “speak of dreams but are mindless” comment that his views have not prevailed upon you.

On topic though, I’ve only decanted one wine thus far. I need to experiment more often though, in order to discern the difference between decanting and not decanting. One more thing: My brother just visited Argentina; he brought me a wine (Finca EL PORTILLO Tempranillo 2005) from Mendoza. Right now I am holding on to it, I understand, in general, that Tempranillo has flavors of cherries and even takes on earthy sweet vanillin notes. If you have tasted a Tempranillo from that area, I would appreciate your thoughts.
quote:
Originally posted by mpls wine guy:
Sancho, are you sure the 2005 El Portillo from Mendoza wasn't Malbec?


mpls wg,

On the front label under the grape variety (Tempranillo), “Mendoza” is written. Similarly, the back label has a map of Mendoza with a geographical regional detail illustrating “Bodega El Portillo.” Also listed are: “Apelacion Valle de Uco, Tunuyan” and “geografia Mendoza.” At first (with the little that I have read about the region), I also thought that it should have been a Malbec variety. The details though, say otherwise.
Allow me to digress...

I lived in Mendoza for several months. What an absolutely beautiful place! Y la comida? El asado, noquis, pan frances, alfajores, empanadas, dulce de leche, lomitos, milanesa napolitana, dulce de batata...

Unfortunately, I wasn't a wine drinker at the time...(ughh)
quote:
Originally posted by gigabit:
Allow me to digress...

I lived in Mendoza for several months. What an absolutely beautiful place! Y la comida? El asado, noquis, pan frances, alfajores, empanadas, dulce de leche, lomitos, milanesa napolitana, dulce de batata...

Unfortunately, I wasn't a wine drinker at the time...(ughh)


Delectable digression, and familiar: one of my good friends is of Argentine ethnicity.
Juan,
I was in Venezuela about 10 years ago for a short while. I thought the people were great - friendly, helpful. I'm really glad to have read your post and the comments. I had just read the news this morning and it seems like every week or so Chavez is in the news taking a shot at the US. I find it depressing. If there is only one person in Venezuela that feels otherwise (as you apparently do), I feel better already!!

My 2 cents on decanting...When I started drinking wine, I was told to decant older red wines. I have experienced (and read here) that although pouring to eliminate sediment may be appropriate for some of the older wines, there is no substitute for tasting the wine and judging for yourself. If it tastes great, drink it up. You may find that on many of the younger reds, some air time will improve the taste. Try some both ways and you'll begin to be able to tell when decanting will help.
sancho, i didn't taste the mendoza tempranillo, in fact the only variety that i taste from argentina is torrontes witch i like, thanks to Mr. Chavéz we have problem with importation almost all the wines that i drink are from chile, and on top of that i find a lot of wine with dry corks because of bad transpotation or on the store don't know how to manipulate the bottles, in Venezuela the wine culture is low, almost everybody drinks beer, scotch and rum.

Notawinebrat, not everybody thinks like Chavéz in Venezuela, in fact there are a big percentage of the population that are against his though.

i'll try some experiments with cabernet, i going to pour some in three glasses and drink one without swirl, then swirl the second and let breath a half an hour the third, to start to know the differences.
quote:
Originally posted by Juan C. Calabria G.:
sancho, i didn't taste the mendoza tempranillo, in fact the only variety that i taste from argentina is torrontes witch i like, thanks to Mr. Chavéz we have problem with importation almost all the wines that i drink are from chile, and on top of that i find a lot of wine with dry corks because of bad transpotation or on the store don't know how to manipulate the bottles, in Venezuela the wine culture is low, almost everybody drinks beer, scotch and rum.

Notawinebrat, not everybody thinks like Chavéz in Venezuela, in fact there are a big percentage of the population that are against his though.

i'll try some experiments with cabernet, i going to pour some in three glasses and drink one without swirl, then swirl the second and let breath a half an hour the third, to start to know the differences.


JCCG, I also had a Zolo Torrontes 2007 -- crisp, dry, pear flavor, and easy drinking (refreshing). Salud!

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