I have a 2lb bonelss leg of lamb for Sunday night. What are your cooking tips, ideal oven temp and cook time, etc. etc? I like provencal herbs and garlic salt but I am interested to know what other members do.
Original Post
A low oven temp would be ideal. Figure 250-275 for 2.5-3 hours to get it to about 135 degrees.

Season it however you'd like. Try a mint pesto for a garnish.
Butterfly it. Rub it down with a little evoo. Salt and pepper to taste. Grill to rare. I like a little teriyaki glaze towards the end of grilling. Let sit 10 minutes and slice thin.

YUM!

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
Butterfly it. Rub it down with a little evoo. Salt and pepper to taste. Grill to rare. I like a little teriyaki glaze towards the end of grilling. Let sit 10 minutes and slice thin.

YUM!

PH


PH
That sounds really good to me. Unfortunately I am serving some elder family members who think Rosemary is on the cutting edge though Razz. I will not be able to use that tonight. I still have your Korean Kiwi marinade for beef on my to do list as well.

Berno,
I will probably go with your method. Will the outside still get crispy at that temp?

Seanr7,
When you say yogurt do you mean the natural unflavored kind. That sounds a little wild.

Thanks for your help guys.
quote:
When you say yogurt do you mean the natural unflavored kind. That sounds a little wild.



Spo here is the recipe, I CNP'd it from foodnetwork;

1 de-boned (5 pound) leg of lamb, trimmed of excess fat
5 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
2 cups Greek-style yogurt
1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
2 teaspoons ground cumin
3 to 5 dashes hot pepper sauce
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Using a paring knife, make several small slits over the entire surface of the lamb, and stuff the slits with the sliced garlic. Add the yogurt, mint, cumin and hot pepper sauce to the work bowl of a food processor and process until smooth. Place the lamb on a large baking sheet and rub the entire leg with the yogurt mixture. Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours, or overnight.
Preheat the grill to high. Remove the lamb from the marinade and season well with salt and pepper. Place the lamb, skin side down, on the grill. Grill until the skin side is golden brown, then turn the lamb over, and reduce the heat of the grill to medium so that the grill maintains a constant temperature of 350 degrees F. Continue grilling until a thermometer inserted deep into the meat reaches a temperature of 145 degrees F for medium-rare doneness, about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours. Remove lamb from grill, cover with foil, and let rest for 10 minutes. Slice the meat on the bias into 1/4-inch thick slices.
quote:
he marinated it in Yogert(SP) it looked great on TV.


Marinatement in Yougert is make look good on tV to move quantatives of Yougert in stock - it is a paid for by yougert manufactors.



quote:
That sounds a little wild.


And sexy, to.
Wine Kamikaze,
Always nice to see your moniker, and sometimes unfortunate to receive your advice. Will my lamb get a crispy exterior at a low oven temp?
Probably not. The exterior will be browned, but not crispy. It WILL get crispy on the grill. I serve this recipe to my 80 year old father, who's idea of lamb before trying this was to kill it in the oven until it was grey, and then put mint jelly all over it!!! He's never gone back!! Good luck!! Big Grin

PH
quote:
my 80 year old father, who's idea of lamb before trying this was to kill it in the oven until it was grey,



That description sounds familiar. Smile
Butterflying the leg of lamb, and using skewers to maintain its shape is the best way to ensure consistency of cooking.

I often use a glaze of equal parts mustard and olive oil, 2 tablespoons of worcesteshire sause, some chopped garlic and chopped rosemary on leg of lamb. If cooking lamb this way ensure that you remove all the surface fat from the lamb.

I cook in the oven at a high heat (230C) for 15 minutes and then turn the heat down to (180C) until cooking is complete, normally another 40 minutes or so.

I also use a meat thermometer, when cooking, rather than relying on timing.
quote:
Originally posted by spo1977:
Will my lamb get a crispy exterior at a low oven temp?

What about searing it on each sides before putting it in the oven?
I just thought about that Big Grin
Would that work?
no that dos not work

people (even 99% of the chefs) still beleve that roasting bevor putting into the oven closes the pores, that is not correct! the only thing that happen is that the "maillard-reaction" proteins and sugares react thogeter end change taste. (exp. very simplyfied)

so if you like to have a crust,

marinate the leg, do a long therm at cooking into the oven, at the moment when the center get's about 65°c turn youre oven hot 220°c and leave it for 8 minutes. thake it out an let it calm the jus inside for 2 minutes bevor cutting.
quote:
Originally posted by Squirreljam:
Tsunami has apparently read Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking"... Smile


no i didn't , but i will check this out.

i read from hervé this-benckhard two books,

i do read the most food related books

at the moment i'm reading a book from udo polmer about the "ingredience and non-ingrediences" of the industry
I've had success with a recipe from jamie Oliver's first cookbook, in which he punctures the meat to make little holes in which he puts various things. I like it with prosciutto rolled into tubes around some fresh rosemary or some other spice, with a chunk of garlic. Another options is anchovies. Then I rub the whole thing with whatever (i.e. a dry rub, a marinade, hoisin sauce) and back it as per above.

And of course I only serve lamb with either a big chewy Aussie shiraz or a big southern Rhone, ideally a chateauneuf du pape.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
he punctures the meat to make little holes in which he puts various things.

That's a great idea for Xmas presents. I'll give leg of lamb to people and they can use 'em as wallet Cool
Bone-out roasted leg of lamb is one of my favorite kinds of meats.

After seasoning the butterflied leg inside and out with salt pepper and rosemary, I cook it slowly for about four hours, the first three at 400. After approximately 3 hours, I add halved tomatoes marinated in olive oil, salt and sugar, lots of galic cloves and cook another hour uncovered at 375.
We don't use a lot of shiraz, it's used with some garlic and other spices I cannot remember at the moment.

And with a leg of lamb, most of the bites I get are from the interior of the roast, of course, and so are hoisin-free. I like my lamb more rare than the rest of the family.
quote:
Originally posted by coolbronson:
Bone-out roasted leg of lamb is one of my favorite kinds of meats.

After seasoning the butterflied leg inside and out with salt pepper and rosemary, I cook it slowly for about four hours, the first three at 400. After approximately 3 hours, I add halved tomatoes marinated in olive oil, salt and sugar, lots of galic cloves and cook another hour uncovered at 375.
whatever. what is, or isnt, your favorite kind of meat is meaningless... this place is going down hill quick Roll Eyes

i love Lamb Razz Big Grin Cool
Some of you really like to cook the heck out of a lamb roast. A two pound roast cooked at 400 for three hours will be extra well done. For small roasts like this, I also prefer butterflying and grilling. 10-15 minutes on a hot, lump charcoal grill is all it would take. For roasting, I also like to start low and raise the heat at the end. I use convection roast which will often brown well even at the lower temps.
quote:
Originally posted by kumazam:
what is, or isnt, your favorite kind of meat is meaningless... this place is going down hill quick Roll Eyes



What's really meaningless and sad is your poorly worded attempt to attack me for posting a recipe for leg of lamb. Your petty vengeance is transparent and laughable, but not unexpected.
quote:
Originally posted by Big M:
Some of you really like to cook the heck out of a lamb roast. A two pound roast cooked at 400 for three hours will be extra well done.


Try it.
quote:
Originally posted by coolbronson:
What's really meaningless and sad is your poorly worded attempt to attack me for posting a recipe for leg of lamb. Your petty vengeance is transparent and laughable, but not unexpected.
i dunno cool... the fact that you thought that was an honest attempt at attacking you on my part is pretty sad & laughable... Roll Eyes but i will agree it was not unexpected Razz
Honest or dishonest, save your energy for something exciting instead. Like your customary bi-nightly report on the contents of your stomach.
PurpleHaze,
I am going to grill a leg of Lamb like you said. I was thinking about marinating it in soy sauce/sesame oil mixture maybe with some cola. How do you think that would turn out?
I don't know about the cola. Don't get me wrong, my daughter forced me to eat an oven baked pork chop that was made with ketchup and Coke as part of the sauce once, and it was actually edible. I'm wondering if the sugar in the cola might cause flareups. Confused If you try it, please let us know how it works out!

PH
I will have to do a little digging on the internet. I have heard of cola marinades before and if I remember correctly it was a Korean recipe. I will let you know how it turns out. I was figuring I would let the meat marinate overnight.
Dig around. I also posted a Korean marinade here, that might be interesting with lamb. I don't know how much "tenderization" a butterflied leg of lamb needs, though. You may want to watch the time if using this marinade, or skip the kiwi altogether.

I've always liked a marinade combining some red wine, red wine vinegar, soy, lots of chopped garlic and chopped ginger, a little bit of oil and whatever spices I have around the stike my fancy. Works nicely on lamb.

PH
I did that marinade before. That is where I got the idea for the soy and sesame oil. I have been using soy and sesame on rice, rice now excites me. Big Grin
quote:
I've always liked a marinade combining some red wine, red wine vinegar, soy, lots of chopped garlic and chopped ginger, a little bit of oil and whatever spices I have around the stike my fancy. Works nicely on lamb.


PurpleHaze
I put this one on the back burner for a while, but at the moment I have a leg of lamb sitting in olive oil, kosher salt and provencal herbs. I am going grill it. Would you mind providing some quantitys for the oil, soy, wine and red wine vinegar you spoke of above?

Do you think fennel would be good on lamb, Would it fight the provencal?
Fennel works with lamb quite nicely.

I'm not much on measuring, I just kind of wing it. The oil and vinegar should only be a few tbs. each. The oil provides some "non stick" to the meat, and the vinegar is for tenderization purposes more than for flavor.

Probably one part soy sauce to two or three parts wine should work, as too much soy will give a good bit of saltiness to the marinade. Mess around with it and do the finger test. Stick your finger in the marinade and see how it tastes. If it tastes good on your finger, it'll do just fine!

You just need enough to cover the meat all over. I love a one gallon ziplock for marinading as you can flip it over and handle the meat so easily. Good luck! Post your results.... Smile

PH
I rarely grill a butterflied lamb leg for 2 reasons: very difficult to cut the meat to one thickness so it's hard to cook evenly, and if it's been marinated-- which as far as I can tell is the ONLY reason to cook it open-- it's hard to control flare-ups when the marinade residue hits the grill. My best advice is to wipe the meat down as much as possible after removing it from the marinade.

IMHO, I think an oven-roasted tied leg with some herbs inside always gives a better product.
I freaking love the flavor of BBQ grilled lamb. It's definitely a "stay with the grill" preparation. I have no problem slicing, but due to the nature of the butterflied meat, you will get varying levels of doneness. Works well in our family as there are varying preferences for doneness anyway. And when I make it, it doesn't matter how thick it's sliced or how well it's cooked, it all gets devoured!! Wink Keeping the oil to a minimum also helps greatly in avoiding flare ups.

PH
I like the flavour of BBQ lamb as well, but only do rib chops or loin chops on the grill. I like leg better roasted. Everybody's got their preferences.

I think that's why they make so many different wines, too. Smile
Seaquam,
I just finished eating and I had meat from well done all the way to med and all of it was good. I did enjoy grilling for a change and I will do it next time also. Next time I am doing a marinade like PurpleHaze's. Good stuff, PurpleHaze, Thanks.

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