May go this way as tired of glasses, and found that contacts did not work with me.

Has anyone had this procedure, and how were the results?

Tentative schedule for next week, but still have a bail out option.
Original Post
I'm an ophthalmologist who performs it.

It's a good procedure, but the key is in the screening. My general advice is to be cautious with whom you let cut your eyeballs. If the first time you will ever meet the surgeon is while you're lying under the laser you must consider what this means, and who did your screening.

Enjoy- done right on the right candidate this is a terrific procedure.
Best decision I ever made. I had pretty bad eyesight with astigmatisms. After my post eye surgery nap I was reading road signs from what seemed like miles away. This was ~ 5 years ago and I'm sure the equipment and procedures have improved since then.
Just not for me - I don't mind the glasses and contacts nearly enough to justify it both for what it is (frankly what they do it kind of creepy) or for the risk - which while small still exists.
I have never had to wear glasses or contacts, so might look into it now that reading small print in less than perfect light is not easy some days.
My wife had it done in one eye and a month later had a detached retina which required emergency surgery. They were able to restore most of her eyesight but only back to what is was prior to lasik. Doctor's said that she was not a good candidate due to thin membrane or something like that. Bottom line is to ensure that the doctor performing the screening is honest, reputable and thorough, and not just looking to make a buck.
I've thought about it, but every time I start to do the research and read up on the proceedure, I get very queasy. Nearly slicing off a layer of my eyeball like a grapeskin, then folding it back into place??? Red Face Makes me want to toss my toast.
I keep dropping the matter until next year.
W+A- can't help that with LASIK, sorry. Get some reading glasses, old man. Wink

Xhoser- sorry to hear of your wife's experience. Myopic (nearsighted) people are prone to retinal detachments at a much greater rate than the general population. Analysis of data in nearsighted people who have had LASIK vs those who haven't had LASIK actually shows no difference in the rate of retinal detachment. Unfortunately one of the repairs for retinal detachment (scleral buckle) commonly causes myopia, which I assume is what happened to your wife. I'm glad to hear however that she has good vision (albeit with glasses) once again after her RD.

jcocktosten- I'm fairly creepy even if you don't consider that I cut on people's eyeballs for a living.

I'll stick to my standard line from before- done correctly on the correct person LASIK is a great procedure. It's not for everyone for both physical and psychological reasons.
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
W+A- can't help that with LASIK, sorry. Get some reading glasses, old man. Wink



Darn. Frown

Anything on the horizon?
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
W+A- can't help that with LASIK, sorry. Get some reading glasses, old man. Wink



Darn. Frown

Anything on the horizon?


Prob not too soon. The last "latest greatest" for that problem turned out to be a bust.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
W+A- can't help that with LASIK, sorry. Get some reading glasses, old man. Wink



Darn. Frown

Anything on the horizon?


Yes - K-mart is running a blue light special on reading glasses this weekend. stock up so you can afford to lose a few pairs. Wink

thirsty "Why did I let my son break another pair of glasses" man
quote:
Originally posted by thirsty man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
W+A- can't help that with LASIK, sorry. Get some reading glasses, old man. Wink



Darn. Frown

Anything on the horizon?


Yes - K-mart is running a blue light special on reading glasses this weekend. stock up so you can afford to lose a few pairs. Wink

thirsty "Why did I let my son break another pair of glasses" man


Razz Wink
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
Myopic (nearsighted) people are prone to retinal detachments at a much greater rate than the general population.


Yep, I wore glasses from the 3rd grade until I was 16, then wore gas-perm contacts for 18 years. My eye doc always warned me that retinal tears and/or detachments were very probable in my future. Had a retinal tear in my right eye in 2001 (with laser surgery), then just went in a couple months ago because of what I was seeing in my left eye. Left eye turned out to be fine Confused , but the doctor found another tear and detachment in the right eye (so another laser surgery....hopefully it will hold).

I had Lasik done in '99 after my contacts started popping out of my eyes at bad times, such as......standing in the middle of a back country river in BC flyfishing by myself. Being a -11.50 uncorrected just doesn't lend itself well to being stuck someplace without contacts (or even with just one). I never could wear glasses very well, so didn't even have any at that point.
quote:
It's a good procedure, but the key is in the screening. My general advice is to be cautious with whom you let cut your eyeballs. If the first time you will ever meet the surgeon is while you're lying under the laser you must consider what this means, and who did your screening.


Bascom-Palmer will be doing it [aff w/ U of Miami Medical School, and is right here in teh Gardens. Doc has done 20,000. will be done by Chief of Staff.
Last edited by flwino
quote:
Originally posted by flwino / E A E:
quote:
It's a good procedure, but the key is in the screening. My general advice is to be cautious with whom you let cut your eyeballs. If the first time you will ever meet the surgeon is while you're lying under the laser you must consider what this means, and who did your screening.


Bascom-Palmer will be doing it [aff w/ U of Miami Medical School, and is right here in teh Gardens. Doc has done 20,000. will be done by Chief of Staff.


Terry O'Brien is a good guy. I would trust anyone at Bascom to do my LASIK. This is the correct and safe model for Laser Eye Surgery centers.

Good luck, and enjoy!
quote:
Posted Jul 26, 2008 11:49 AM Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by flwino / E A E:

quote:
It's a good procedure, but the key is in the screening. My general advice is to be cautious with whom you let cut your eyeballs. If the first time you will ever meet the surgeon is while you're lying under the laser you must consider what this means, and who did your screening.


Bascom-Palmer will be doing it [aff w/ U of Miami Medical School, and is right here in teh Gardens. Doc has done 20,000. will be done by Chief of Staff.


Terry O'Brien is a good guy. I would trust anyone at Bascom to do my LASIK. This is the correct and safe model for Laser Eye Surgery centers.

Good luck, and enjoy!



He is the one. Thanks for the recommendation. too many places offer this, but they do seem like K-Mart, cheap, fast in and out.
I have thought about getting it. I have heard that something like 5% (just from memory, don't be insulted if that is bad info) develop a painful eye condition. That is what scares me. Does the screening process weed out the people who will develop that eye condition or just the people who will revert to bad eye sight?
I had this done 18 months ago, after going through a screening process that was personal to me, in that my first requirement was that I had to personally know 3 people that used this doctor. I met that hurdle, then went and had my screening with the doctor himself, followed up by the surgery.

I will tell you, if you are a candidate, this is one of the greatest things that you will do. I have two young sons (5 and 7) and not worrying about glasses just for them is remarkable.
quote:
Originally posted by spo:
I have thought about getting it. I have heard that something like 5% (just from memory, don't be insulted if that is bad info) develop a painful eye condition. That is what scares me. Does the screening process weed out the people who will develop that eye condition or just the people who will revert to bad eye sight?


Not insulted. I think what you are referring to is dry eyes, the chances of which are higher if you go into this with dry eyes. Many long term contact lens wearers (abusers?) have chronic dry eyes which can be exacerbated by LASIK. My personal preference with this type of patient is either to wait until the dry eyes resolve completely (can take months) and/or perform a variation on LASIK called PRK. PRK may be less prone to cause chronic dry eye problems because less tissue is effectively removed. A university setting would usually be a good place to discuss this with your (potential) eye surgeon.

Proper careful screening (usually not done in the mall Smile) can help weed this out. It will also weed out more serious vision-threatening issues that can occur if LASIK is done on the wrong person. It will also help weed out those with unrealistic expectations and downright crazy people. I tell most patients that if they are expecting perfection at all times out of their vision they should not have LASIK. The goal is to reduce and probably eliminate the need for glasses or contacts, not to give perfect Steve Austin vision. One of the first questions I ask a patient who I'm evaluating for LASIK is "what kind of work do you do?". If the answer is "engineer", "architect", "radiologist", "pilot", or "photographer" that tells me a lot about what they might expect out of their vision and changes the nature of my discussion with them. Plaintiff's attorneys are automatically told that they are not candidates Razz

Should I be handing out my card here? Wink
A friend of mine had a proceedure some years ago where the natural lens was removed from his eye, and a plastic one inserted in its place. He still wears glasses, but said his eyesite was remarkedly improved. Is this still common?
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
A friend of mine had a proceedure some years ago where the natural lens was removed from his eye, and a plastic one inserted in its place. He still wears glasses, but said his eyesite was remarkedly improved. Is this still common?


That's called clear lens exchange. It's basically a cataract surgery without the cataract. Cataract surgery is the most common surgery performed under Medicare in the United States. Generally though this is less safe than an external procedure such as LASIK or PRK for a number of reasons. Some people elect to have this done though because they are so nearsighted that laser vision correction is not possible and they're desperate. There is also a niche procedure where an implantable contact lens is put into the eye. That too is less preferred than external procedures. The (now) old standby of LASIK or PRK should be the first choice for someone wanting freedom from glasses in 2008.
Good luck E.

Grossie - I was speaking of the procedure not those that perform it. I know a number of people who have had it, swear by it and for them it was a great experience.
Good luck E. You will be surprised how quickly you will be "back in action". Did I mention it makes the wine taste better too? Smile
Grossie:

mentioned you to Dr. O'Brien, and he says to pass along a hell-o

Otherwise, I feel greta, Can read paper without glasses,a nd see distances. Biggest problem, the the number of eye drops that i need to take every day. But hey, only for a short term.
Erin WIno--
Let us know when you can read the labels on the German wine and if the surgery help the pronunciation any. Big Grin
grossie-
just to clarify: I've always understood that LASIK, and procedures like that, and not effictive for those into their fortes. That it won't last. Is this really true?
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Erin WIno--
Let us know when you can read the labels on the German wine and if the surgery help the pronunciation any. Big Grin


I can read legal print!! Still a bit of strain on computer, but will improve. Still less than 24 hours since done.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
grossie-
just to clarify: I've always understood that LASIK, and procedures like that, and not effictive for those into their fortes. That it won't last. Is this really true?


LASIK and related procedures do work on those in their 40s and beyond, but what this accomplishes is a correction in distance vision, not a correction of the need for reading glasses. Sometimes people will choose monovision, which corrects one eye for distance, the other for reading. I personally will only do a monovision correction on a patient who has tried monovision before, usually with contact lenses.

Thanks for the props, EW. I'm not sure if Dr O'Brien actually knows me (not sure if you actually know my real name), although I know he knows a couple of my partners.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
grossie-
just to clarify: I've always understood that LASIK, and procedures like that, and not effictive for those into their fortes. That it won't last. Is this really true?


I had LASIK done 9 years ago when I was in my early 50s. I'd had terrible eyesight since I was 8 years old, and was tired of heavy glasses and contacts.

My eyesight is still fine, although my distance vision is not quite as sharp as it was right after the procedure. I had monovision correction, so I can read well without reading glasses and still see adequately at a distance.

The only wrinkle is that I live in CA, where the DMV requires that each eye (independently) be 20/40 or better. Because of the monovision correction, one eye falls outside that, so I need to wear low-power glasses when I drive. I'll take that to be able to read.
I have a friend at work that just got lasik down in Mexico. The procedure was obviously much cheaper down there (not something I would personally want on sale, but to each his own). He said the difference is truly amazing. I’m the only one in my family without glasses which is funny because I’m the only one with an office type job that requires many hours in front of the computer.
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
I’m the only one in my family without glasses which is funny because I’m the only one with an office type job that requires many hours in front of the computer.

I was that way also. It took about 6 years of computer work for me to require glasses.

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