Hi... Are there Italian and French cookbooks considered as "classics"? There are thousands of cookbooks out there and a novice like myself can easily get confused. I'm looking for beginner's books with lots of color illustrations. Any inputs will be appreciated.
Original Post
French cuisine is by far my favorite. Check out Julia Child's books. She explains everything in detail including diagrams. Rather than just giving resipes alone, she teaches you how to cook. I highly recommend them. Be sure to get her Mastering the Art of French Cooking.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
French cuisine is by far my favorite. Check out Julia Child's books. She explains everything in detail including diagrams. Rather than just giving resipes alone, she teaches you how to cook. I highly recommend them. Be sure to get her Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

What is your opinion of Alton Brown?
I have to second Julia Childs "Mastering the Art of French Cooking". Also need to include any book by Jacques Pepin. The Saveur Cooks Authentic French is another very good French Cookbook.

For fancy french cooking there's Freddy Girardet's book, and Le Gavroche, by Michel Roux Jr. Not to mention Hubert Keller's "The Cuisine of Hubert Keller", which is a cookbook I reference frequently.

With Italian Cooking... Mario Batali's "Babbo" is one that I used a LOT when I was first learning italian methods.
An entertaining "French" cookbook by an American that I've enjoyed lately is Les Halles by Anthony Bourdain. At the very least it's a fun read and he covers many basics and includes some standard French classics.

IMO Alton Brown is a bit of a twit, the geek of the kitchen. I enjoy his scientific approach but he has almost no regard for classic techniques.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×