I quite like Stilton, but I'm too lazy to eat around the rind. What's the proper etiquette?

(OK, I thought it was time for another cheese thread)
Original Post
Dunno the official answer, but I eat the rind on almost everything except if it's dusty (farmhouse cheddar) or will break a tooth (e.g. parmesan reggiano)...
I've eaten plenty of mouldy rinds, including Stilton, and have not felt any ill effects. The stank does tend to get stronger as you get closer to rind.
hmm
some people like it,
but i hate ammoniated stiltons.
That said
the rind is very often ammoniated to some degree,
why would you want to eat that?
To me the rind tastes just like the cheese, only stronger. Since I like strong cheese I have no problem with that. The real reason I eat it is because I'm too lazy to eat around it.

What about others like Brie, or Camembert? I eat those rinds too. Is there anyone else here in the "eat the whole thing" club? I guess the only ones I don't eat are the very hard ones, like SJ said.
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
Is there anyone else here in the "eat the whole thing" club?


Sometimes, you just make it TOO easy. Big Grin

I eat the rind on soft cheeses but don't on hard cheeses. I've eaten volcanic ash coatings on some artisanal goat cheeses (tastes like charcoal, to which it's probably related) though I'm sure eating a lot of it isn't too healthy. To answer the original question, I don't eat Stilton rind.

I sometimes save the rinds of hard cheeses, especially Parmiggiano, to throw in when I make soups like minestrone or black bean, mainly in the winter. They add a nice bit of flavour.

I think anyone who eats oysters can probably handle any cheese rind.
What about the rind on Babybel? Someone told those are not eatable, but somehow i don't belive it. They are not very flavourfull and slightly chewier than the cheese inside, but good exersize anyhow.
quote:
grunhauser
Member
Posted Sep 02, 2006 08:09 PM
The real question is what to pair with the rind?


Maybe the sediment at the bottom of the bottle Razz
hmmmm.....to eat or not to eat....that is the question!!! Roll Eyes I like the rinds on a brie or camembert, a pave d'affinois, St. Andre. Can't do the stilton thing though...just a little too much for me! I do like to drop the hard rinds or just a nice chunk)of a good locatelli romano or a parmesan into my soups or sauce (a really nice addition I learned from my Italian in-laws!!). It can't be beat! And THEN you eat the rind!!
Cool Ooooo, yum... I do love Brie, rind and all, when gently heated to where it is warmly soft, on a water cracker with just a dab of jalepeno/mint jelly. To die for...
Rind? Consistency. Ammonia. Ick.

As for the etiquette, I don't know. Mother always told me I, "...wouldn't be eating with the Queen anytime soon." Maybe I'll ask good old mom.
)I lovd Stilton but don't eat the rind except sometimes when it's a white stilton with fruit and I'm having a thick, rich Aussie stickie (there's another easy one for you, SeaQ! Big Grin Razz)
I'm eating another piece right now and I am eating the rind. Why? Because it's there. It also doesn't taste that different from the cheese. Perhaps it's the variety of Stilton that matters? This is Colston Bassett stilton and the rind is not that different from the cheese.
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
I'm eating another piece right now and I am eating the rind. Why? Because it's there.



Brilliant! Big Grin
grossie posted:
I quite like Stilton, but I'm too lazy to eat around the rind. What's the proper etiquette?

(OK, I thought it was time for another cheese thread)

Old post, I see, but exactly what I was contemplating and wondering what others practiced.

I first had Stilton at the age of eight and, yes, we ate the ‘rind’ then and I have since. I’m not certain that it’s proper etiquette but I believe that it’s commonly practiced. The rind is certainly different from the creamy center of the cheese, offering a different texture and taste, but it’s quite edible and delicious.

docbriggs posted:
grossie posted:
I quite like Stilton, but I'm too lazy to eat around the rind. What's the proper etiquette?

(OK, I thought it was time for another cheese thread)

Old post, I see, but exactly what I was contemplating and wondering what others practiced.

I first had Stilton at the age of eight and, yes, we ate the ‘rind’ then and I have since. I’m not certain that it’s proper etiquette but I believe that it’s commonly practiced. The rind is certainly different from the creamy center of the cheese, offering a different texture and taste, but it’s quite edible and delicious.

I was wondering the other day about the rind on Port Salut.

irwin posted:
docbriggs posted:
grossie posted:
I quite like Stilton, but I'm too lazy to eat around the rind. What's the proper etiquette?

(OK, I thought it was time for another cheese thread)

Old post, I see, but exactly what I was contemplating and wondering what others practiced.

I first had Stilton at the age of eight and, yes, we ate the ‘rind’ then and I have since. I’m not certain that it’s proper etiquette but I believe that it’s commonly practiced. The rind is certainly different from the creamy center of the cheese, offering a different texture and taste, but it’s quite edible and delicious.

I was wondering the other day about the rind on Port Salut.

i thoguht port salut was wax covered?  If so, I'm sure you could eat wax if you so choose to?  Add enough salt and wine, it might be palatable? 

I saw a recipe that has parmesan rind as an ingredient, slow cooking.  Would it be fair to add some parmesan cheese (grated) as part of the recipe?

That orange stuff on Muenster is just food coloring on the pasturized supermarket stuff, or if you're lucky, paprika. On some versions it can be anatto, which is the coloring agent they used to make cheddar cheese orange. In any case, it's edible. But that's not good cheese. Treat yourself to the real stuff from France and you're in for a treat! I always thought it was a useless cheese until I got to try the real deal. It's a washed rind cheese with none of that orange stuff and it has a really powerful smell. Really great.

As far as subbing grated Parmesan for rinds, I suppose the poster is long gone, but the answer is that it's not going to be the same. The rind will add some flavor and maybe break down and it's otherwise kind of useless, so they're just trying to get the last bit of value out of it. But they don't grate the rind. They grate the tasty stuff. So I'd put the grated stuff on top when serving.

numenor posted:
... the rind is very often ammoniated to some degree ...

Is that a euphemism for saying the rind has been urinated on?  Is that practice still employed, or has it passed into the history books like treading grapes under bare feet?

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