Edited from this week's Globe and Mail:

For wine lovers, it's become a major pain: Airport carry-on restrictions limiting fluid containers to 100 millilitres have sucked part of the joy out of foodie travel.

It's meant having to swaddle souvenir bottles in old socks or dog-eared copies of the International Herald Tribune and praying they won't meet with one of those baggage handlers using his job as shot-put practice for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. For those with already-bulging suitcases, it's often meant having to guzzle the precious wine out of plastic cups in the terminal or, worse, leave it behind at the last minute. But enterprising fliers are finding ways to ease the hassle of travelling with wine.

Uline, a packaging supplier based in Illinois, is one of several distributors that sells the inserts along with heavy-cardboard boxes. They cost between $4.95 and $18.50 (U.S.), depending on capacity.

Some of you may be wondering: Aren't Canadian travellers limited to two bottles? Not unless you live in the Northwest Territories or Nunavut. Two bottles (technically 1.5 litres of wine or 1.14 litres of liquor) is simply the duty-free threshold; you're allowed to exceed that up to a specified volume (which varies from province to province), provided that the alcohol travels with you - and that you're willing to pay federal duties and provincial or territorial assessments.

In Ontario and British Columbia, for example, vacationers can bring back as much as 45 litres, or five 12-bottle cases. What you'll pay above the two-bottle exemption isn't trivial. (This is Canada, after all.) Typically, besides GST and PST, you'll get dinged for import and excise duties, plus a substantial provincial border levy. In Ontario, the provincial levy is 39.6 per cent on the landed cost of the wine and 59.9 per cent on the landed cost of a spirit. Result: A $14 bottle of wine will end up costing you $23.38 at the Canada Customs desk at the airport. In British Columbia, a $14 bottle would end up costing $29.40.

Like I said, that's not trivial. For this reason, I tend only to bring back rare wines that have special meaning, or bottles I'm unlikely ever to find in Canada. But if you're carrying, say, no more than three or four bottles (as opposed to my usual 36), you may find the Canadian Border Services Agency staff a lot more congenial than they have a reputation for being. Earlier this month I declared five wine bottles while returning from the United States through Pearson International in Toronto. Total charge: nada.

The key, and I'm not just being an earnest do-gooder here, is to always declare what you've got. "The last thing you want is any kind of red flag beside your name," Mr. Fekete said. "Really, there isn't a bottle of wine that's worth it." No, not even a '47 Cheval Blanc.

If you're carrying really precious cargo, you can ask for "special handling." Most airlines, including Air Canada, offer this service free to people with things like cellos and snowboards. (It's amazing how many kids treat their snowboards with more care than their parents' cars.) In this case, you must go to a special counter at the destination airport, where your box will be delicately brought out - after an interminable wait - by hand.

Usually, they're pretty good at honouring special-handling requests, but don't bet your snowboarding career on it. I've asked for special handling in the past only to watch my 12-bottle wine box tumble down the regular conveyor. (None the worse for wear, thankfully.)

For tourists who intend to return with no more than two bottles, another U.S. company has come up with a hassle-free solution. BottleWise Duo is a padded bag containing two removable watertight pouches. The whole thing then rolls into a tight package and is designed to be packed into your checked luggage.

BottleWise Duo may also give peace of mind to travellers labouring under a misconception about bottles and planes. On a recent Caribbean cruise, several passengers sought my advice on how to transport Champagne back to Canada. Their concern: whether sparkling wine would burst in the airplane's cargo hold.

In theory, they're not wrong to wonder. Sparkling wine exerts about the same pressure as a truck tire. As air pressure outside the bottle drops with altitude, the tendency is for the dissolved carbon dioxide gas - the bubbles - to either pop the cork or burst the glass.

But there's no real need to worry. For one thing, thick Champagne bottles and the wire cages that fasten the cork to the neck are sturdy enough to withstand the pressure differential. More importantly, most airline cargo holds are pressurized these days. (They wouldn't be sticking pets down there otherwise.)

By way of personal testimonial, I can say I've returned home on planes with numerous bottles of sparkling wine over the years and have never had a problem. .

Bringing it back safely

With new airport restrictions on carry-on liquids, here are some solutions to the challenge of travelling with wine (or spirits or olive oil).

Uline, based in Illinois, is one of several companies selling inexpensive, reusable "Styrofoam wine shippers" (Uline.com or 1-800-958-5463). The shippers are heavy cardboard boxes lined with thick Styrofoam inserts configured for one, two, three, six or 12 bottles. A typical minimum order of four six-bottle shippers costs $42 (U.S.) plus shipping. (Shipping charges to Toronto $21.21, to Vancouver $29.11. But the shipping charges will probably come down next month as Uline opens a Canadian warehouse in Toronto.) Another vendor is Oakland Packaging & Supply of California, which also ships to Canada (Oakpackaging.com).

In the wake of airport restrictions, many wineries in such consumer-friendly regions as California now offer Styrofoam-padded boxes for sale in their tasting rooms. Ask before you buy.

Ken Chase, Air Canada's wine expert and consultant, recommends the Styrofoam boxes. For consumers travelling with fewer than six bottles, he suggests inserting each bottle into a high boot and wrapping clothing around the boot before placing it in luggage.

BottleWise, another U.S. company, has just launched a reusable padded tote bag with two waterproof inner sleeves. The two-bottle bag, which costs $48.95 (U.S.) for the basic version, is designed to be placed inside regular luggage and protect your precious bottles better than soiled towels or socks. It also folds flat for outbound travel and can be used as a BYOB tote bag back on land. Bottlewise.com
Original Post
1980 Rouses Point NY crossing

had 72 plus bottles, 3 case beer in back end of car.

Told Customs that I was returning from home and also went to bank. Asked if I had more than $ 10,000 from bank. Said no. He looked at stash, and said have a nice trip.

PS: I went across that crossing 10 times a week in those days.
I actually wrote a letter to Customs to ask them how much is owing on wine. The reply I received said that the amount owing is calculated as Federal Excise Tax of $0.5122/lr, plus provincial fees, plus Customs duty (usually only around 10 cents/litre), plus GST. The provincial fee is not based on where you live, but rather where you cross the border. This is very important because these fees have huge differences. For example in Nova Scotia, it is only 10 cents/oz, whereas in Ontario it is 39.6% of the value. A link to a summary of the provincial fees can be found on page 9 of this Customs document.

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cm/d2-3-6/d2-3-6-e.pdf

A summary of Customs duty rates can be found on page 5 of this link (look up code 2204.21.21.00):

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/general/publications/tariff2007/01-99/ch22ne.pdf

The rates seem to be nil for US wine (as per UST code), 2.75 cents/litre for Australia and NZ wines and 9.35 cents/litre for everybody else.

The lesson I learned was when possible do not re-enter Canada in either of ON, NB, PQ or BC. The rest of the country is pretty reasonable
Vince, where' ya been, bud??!! Big Grin

We're having an offline here March 29, in honour of DoktaP who will be in town. Little birds tell me that you and yours are considering another trip here to visit family, etc. Why not come that weekend? If not then, come another time soon. We'd love to see you guys again. I promise my port won't be from the Ukraine! (I'd love to hear about it, though probably not drink it....)
quote:
Originally posted by mgs:
I actually wrote a letter to Customs to ask them how much is owing on wine. The reply I received said that the amount owing is calculated as Federal Excise Tax of $0.5122/lr, plus provincial fees, plus Customs duty (usually only around 10 cents/litre), plus GST. The provincial fee is not based on where you live, but rather where you cross the border. This is very important because these fees have huge differences. For example in Nova Scotia, it is only 10 cents/oz, whereas in Ontario it is 39.6% of the value. A link to a summary of the provincial fees can be found on page 9 of this Customs document.

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cm/d2-3-6/d2-3-6-e.pdf

A summary of Customs duty rates can be found on page 5 of this link (look up code 2204.21.21.00):

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/general/publications/tariff2007/01-99/ch22ne.pdf

The rates seem to be nil for US wine (as per UST code), 2.75 cents/litre for Australia and NZ wines and 9.35 cents/litre for everybody else.

The lesson I learned was when possible do not re-enter Canada in either of ON, NB, PQ or BC. The rest of the country is pretty reasonable


Thanks for that. Hopefully I'll be able to experience first hand soon.
quote:
Originally posted by mgs:
I actually wrote a letter to Customs to ask them how much is owing on wine. The reply I received said that the amount owing is calculated as Federal Excise Tax of $0.5122/lr, plus provincial fees, plus Customs duty (usually only around 10 cents/litre), plus GST. The provincial fee is not based on where you live, but rather where you cross the border. This is very important because these fees have huge differences. For example in Nova Scotia, it is only 10 cents/oz, whereas in Ontario it is 39.6% of the value. A link to a summary of the provincial fees can be found on page 9 of this Customs document.

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cm/d2-3-6/d2-3-6-e.pdf

A summary of Customs duty rates can be found on page 5 of this link (look up code 2204.21.21.00):

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/general/publications/tariff2007/01-99/ch22ne.pdf

The rates seem to be nil for US wine (as per UST code), 2.75 cents/litre for Australia and NZ wines and 9.35 cents/litre for everybody else.

The lesson I learned was when possible do not re-enter Canada in either of ON, NB, PQ or BC. The rest of the country is pretty reasonable

Nice job, mgs, and a good, informative posting. Thanks. Wink
On a number of occasions I have taken wine out of Ontario (Sarnia) and back into Ontario (Sault ste Marie) I manually prepared on my computer a commercial invoice and when leaving Ontario had Canada Customs stamp the invoice. Showing the invoice and declaring the wine upon return caused no problems.
quote:
Originally posted by mgs:
....snip ..... A link to a summary of the provincial fees can be found on page 9 of this Customs document.
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cm/d2-3-6/d2-3-6-e.pdf

A summary of Customs duty rates can be found on page 5 of this link (look up code 2204.21.21.00):

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/general/publications/tariff2007/01-99/ch22ne.pdf .....snip ........


Hello MGS or anyone

These links seem to be bad now --any chance of having them updated. I have a terrible time finding things on government web sites ... :-(

BUT -- a GREAT THREAD --and something that I have had a very hard time finding on the internet. Yesterday I was at customs paying for my iPhone and asked a fellow -- he punched in a $5.00 bottle and told me the extra fees would be over $10.00 ---so I asked on a $50 bottle and he re-set in the $30-$40 range --sorry - bad memory and somewhat of shock ...love that 39% for LCBO.

Regards
Greg
I have around 200 bottles sitting in storage in the US waiting to come home. But I cannot bring them home through the BC border, the taxes/duties are just too high (around 100% total). So as a resident of BC, if I get the wine shipped to Alberta, I can skip paying the BC provincal tax and replace that with the AB tax? Because thats the big one, the federal tax and duties is minimal compared to the BC provincal tax on wine.

Thanks
quote:
Originally posted by godx:
I have around 200 bottles sitting in storage in the US waiting to come home. But I cannot bring them home through the BC border, the taxes/duties are just too high (around 100% total). So as a resident of BC, if I get the wine shipped to Alberta, I can skip paying the BC provincal tax and replace that with the AB tax? Because thats the big one, the federal tax and duties is minimal compared to the BC provincal tax on wine.

Thanks


I recently read somewhere that if you were "moving" into BC from the states and had owned the wine for more than 6 months before the "move" you could contact BCLiquor board and the tariffs are somewhere in the range of $2/bottle. Question is, do you know someone who's moving? Big Grin

Either way, if you go through AB, I don't think you can push the 200 bottles in one run. If you do go through AB soon, I would be very interested in hearing what you paid at the border.

Edit: I just re-read your post and realized you were "shipping" it to AB. I don't think this is legally possible. I think you will have to personally take it across the border.
quote:
Originally posted by MountainDog:
I'm not a citizen of Canada but we holding family reunion in Canada (BC). We wanted to take wine there. Does this mean that I have to pay tax on the wine?

How do I find out more information about this?


You will be allowed 2 bottles per "legal aged" head. Of course, if you bring more than 2 there's a chance that you will get waved through and not have to pay anything at the border, but this this the exception as the law limits it to 2.
The following is kind of interesting. To import
100 bottles of $1 wine into Alberta will cost you $317.90 in Duties and Taxes

The same 100 bottles of $1 wine imported into Ontario will cost you $254.77 (Cheaper than Alberta).

To import 1 bottle of $100 wine into Alberta will cost you $8.29 in duties and taxes.

The same 1 bottle of $100 wine into Ontario wil cost you $136.95 in duties and taxes.
quote:
Originally posted by WEc:
I recently read somewhere that if you were "moving" into BC from the states and had owned the wine for more than 6 months before the "move" you could contact BCLiquor board and the tariffs are somewhere in the range of $2/bottle. Question is, do you know someone who's moving? Big Grin

That is true, I know someone who has done it before. Just make sure you have all the paper work, and don't have more than a case of the same thing (or they will smell tax and accuse you of reselling it). It's rare opportunity, but miracles do happen.

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