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I wouldn't under-estimate Kitchen Aid.

I haven't looked at grills, but we just bought all of our appliances for the kitchen, and Kitchen-Aid was on par with much higher-end brands, in every way, and offered savings.

G-Man, "specs" are one thing, but look at things like the build quality. That's what really made KA stand out to me.

The appliances were sturdy, and had the "feel" of Viking, Sub-Zero, Thermador, etc. When I would handle the GE/Whirlpool/Maytag ones, you could feel a considerable step down. In some cases, I even preferred the feel of the KA to the Viking stuff.
Oh, and with respect to grills, I'm a big believer that storage and maintenance or the most important part.

I beat up my grills.

We use them a lot, I mean 3 - 6 days / week, and I rarely clean them.

I don't buy the cheapo grill, but I find that if you're really putting your grill through the ringer, it won't last more than 3 or 4 years. Doesn't matter if you spent $400 or $800. Burners burn, grease corrodes, shit just falls apart if you really use it.
quote:
Originally posted by Wine doc:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
I'll bet some Chevrolets have similar specs to some Mercedes. Personally, I'd go with Weber-- there's a reason why they have such a good reputation.


+1 g-man.
Have had my modest Weber Silver Genesis for 10 years. Little to no maintenance and is rock solid reliable.


i was reading the kitchen aid utilizes the same graded rolled steel that weber utilizes in their construction though.

for 200$/cheaper if it offers similar perfromance build quality why not?

though i've never heard anyone use a ktichenaid before so am wondering.



--Snipes will check when ig et home. thanks!
I was pretty happy with the Home Depot brand CharmGlow gas grill. Relative to some other brands, it was inexpensive. In Seattle, keeping it outside (even under a cover) meant that it was going to break down and corrode quicker than in some other places. It worked well but, alas, it's almost dead after about 8 years.

I would avoid the ceramic-coated cast iron cooking surfaces, mostly because you can't use a wire grill brush to clean.
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
I was pretty happy with the Home Depot brand CharmGlow gas grill. Relative to some other brands, it was inexpensive. In Seattle, keeping it outside (even under a cover) meant that it was going to break down and corrode quicker than in some other places. It worked well but, alas, it's almost dead after about 8 years.

I would avoid the ceramic-coated cast iron cooking surfaces, mostly because you can't use a wire grill brush to clean.


I've been rocking a Charmglow for about a decade, used heavily like Jorge mentioned and covered when not in use. My dad liked his so well that he bought two more, put them in a trailer and brought myself and brother-in-law each one.

The outside still looks great. The burners are about shot as well as the drip trays. It's time for either an overhaul or a new grill. Leaning towards something new.
Get a Weber with the all stainless burners & grates. Had a Silver Genesis for 10 years and a Genesis S 330 for the last three. Can't go wrong with them. Don't get the lower end stuff at Home Depot with ceramic coated grates and bars - get the S line, which will save you lots of time and money in maintenance and parts over the years.
quote:
Originally posted by vinole:
Get a Weber with the all stainless burners & grates. Had a Silver Genesis for 10 years and a Genesis S 330 for the last three. Can't go wrong with them. Don't get the lower end stuff at Home Depot with ceramic coated grates and bars - get the S line, which will save you lots of time and money in maintenance and parts over the years.


+1
There are definitely two schools of thought on this. In fact, just this past weekend, I was in Home Depot buying a Weber One Touch Gold (love it already) and heard the Grill Department Manager telling another customer, "The trend in grills today is to price some of them low enough that replacement parts become obsolete. Use them until they're worn out and buy a new one." That's kind of the way I see my gas grill. Then again, I've never had a really top-end one either.
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
There are definitely two schools of thought on this. In fact, just this past weekend, I was in Home Depot buying a Weber One Touch Gold (love it already) and heard the Grill Department Manager telling another customer, "The trend in grills today is to price some of them low enough that replacement parts become obsolete. Use them until they're worn out and buy a new one." That's kind of the way I see my gas grill. Then again, I've never had a really top-end one either.


there was a really funny review with pictures on homedepot with a charbroil unit where the flames started coming out of the knobs.

talk about uneven heating =)
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
There are definitely two schools of thought on this. In fact, just this past weekend, I was in Home Depot buying a Weber One Touch Gold (love it already) and heard the Grill Department Manager telling another customer, "The trend in grills today is to price some of them low enough that replacement parts become obsolete. Use them until they're worn out and buy a new one." That's kind of the way I see my gas grill. Then again, I've never had a really top-end one either.


That's the school of thought that I subscribe to.

Like you, though, I've never sprung for a high-end grill.

I figure mine will last 3 - 4 years and start to crap out. At $300 - $400 I figure it's easy to replace instead of splurging for a $800 - $1000 grill that might last 6 - 8
That happened to me. Two of my knobs melted.

+1 on the fact that grills, no matter what kind, only last but a few years whether stainless or not. I have found that while the structure of a stainless will hold up, its inner parts (valves/burners/ash bed/igniters) go fast. And replacement parts are so expensive that yeah, you might as well just buy a new one.
quote:
Originally posted by WineTrooper:

I have found that while the structure of a stainless will hold up, its inner parts (valves/burners/ash bed/igniters) go fast.


Exactly my experience.

I'm curious to hear what the people on here who have grills that last 8 - 10 years cook, how they maintain, etc.

What I find is that burger grease, cheese, steak grease, butter, etc all get very hot and eventually melt onto and corrode valves and burners completely.

Stainless steel is stainless steel. I'm sure the Weber is better built than my Kenmore or the Home Depot numbers, but I doubt there's much difference in the steel used for the burners and whatnot. I'm curious how your grills are maintained or used that they last so long.
Ive had a Charbroil RED I picked up at Home Depot about 3 years ago. Its on the smaller side and has been great. I use it 3 to 5 times a week. I love the infrared technology which keeps drippings away from burners and makes it very easy to clean the pan every couple months. It gets plenty hot to seer a steak and does a great job with burgers, dogs and chicken. Its stainless teel and cost about $300.
My gas grill is a Weber Summit S-670 with a natural gas hookup. As GlennK said, they are not cheap, but this will last. I wanted this grill for some time, but was waiting for my last Weber Genesis to kick the bucket before buying the Summit. After 13 years, the Genesis refused to die and I eventually gave it to one of my brothers.

I use all of my grills year round almost exclusively instead of the indoor oven - easily at 90-10 ratio for grill to oven at our house. I only clean the cooking grate after preheating for a new cook. I keep the stainless steel clean as I go, but not excessively, and I do a thorough cleaning every spring.

As for the burners and innards, the burner tubes are under warranty for 10 years, the stainless steel grates and flavorizer bars for 5 years, and the stainless steel shroud itself for 25 years. I'll be shocked if I have to replace the grates or bars after 5 years as they still look brand new after almost two years.
Jorge- I'm afraid you are incorrect about the value of the Weber grill. You might prefer to buy a new one every few years and that's cool with me but in the long run the Weber is of greater value and it is a superior device as the quality of the burn goes.

I think I spent about $500 on my Weber about 11 years ago (it was a $100 off at the end of the season). I live in Chicago, the grill is outside (but under a covered deck) 365 days per year. It gets snowed on when the weather is bad.

I use it on average 3-5 times per week, a little less in the winter (but I still use it), a little more in the summer. I've replaced the burners twice, flavor bars twice, cleaned it out twice, and replaced the grates once. I have never replaced the starter, it still lights mostly on the first click. I can't imagine when I'm buying a new one, I could see it lasting another 10 years.

Parts are so easy to buy it's ridiculous. I go to Weber's website, answer a series of questions (is your grill black? Is the temperature gauge in the middle or on the side? Where are the knobs? etc) and it tells me what parts I need. My total outlay including parts and the grill is about $700. The per-annum cost is about $65, not including gas, and that number will go down over time assuming it lasts.

I've owned crap ones before, the most they'd last under these circumstances is 3-4 years and the burn is terrible and uneven.

Bottom line- Weber is the only grill to buy.
Sounds to me like it's hit or miss on most of the cheaper grills. If it works out, that's great; if not, then it's money wasted. With the Weber's, you seem to have happy customers all around. I guess it depends on which way you want to go.

I'm about 2.5 years into my Weber and love it. I keep it outside in Chicago (even in winter) and use it quite frequently.
Have had 2 Weber's and loved them.

Over a year ago, I gave my Weber Summit to my sister and "traded up" to a Lynx simply because the Lynx was on close-out at a local store and selling below retail.

Love the Lynx cabinet and build in drawers. Cooking quality-wise, I can't say it's notably different or better than the Weber. Perhaps fewer flare-ups because of the burner technology they employ but that is not to say no flare ups.

Webers are not cheap but having had 1 Weber for 6 years and my last Summit for 12 years, they are incredibly reliable. AND, their customer service is fantastic. Had to replace a few parts on the Summit over my 12 years of ownership and always got them for free from Weber and shipped within 3 business days
quote:
Originally posted by Wine Sparty:
Sounds to me like it's hit or miss on most of the cheaper grills. If it works out, that's great; if not, then it's money wasted. With the Weber's, you seem to have happy customers all around. I guess it depends on which way you want to go.

I'm about 2.5 years into my Weber and love it. I keep it outside in Chicago (even in winter) and use it quite frequently.


Sounds like a good summation.

I won't be needing another grill for another year or two, but I'll see if anyone I can find locally has a Weber and see how it's doing.
I also had a Weber Summit 670 and loved it. But when I found a smokin' deal on a massive KitchenAid, I couldn't resist. Huge grilling area, built in warming drawer, storage drawer and cabinet, side burner and sear burner (rocks Ahi like nobody's bidnezz) built like a tank and after two years in the elements, still looks and performs as new. Highly recommended and pricey, but IMO worth it. See here: http://www.kitchenaid.com/shop...]-404347/KFRU488VSS/
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
I also had a Weber Summit 670 and loved it. But when I found a smokin' deal on a massive KitchenAid, I couldn't resist. Huge grilling area, built in warming drawer, storage drawer and cabinet, side burner and sear burner (rocks Ahi like nobody's bidnezz) built like a tank and after two years in the elements, still looks and performs as new. Highly recommended and pricey, but IMO worth it. See here: http://www.kitchenaid.com/shop...]-404347/KFRU488VSS/


You could live in that thing!
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:


You could live in that thing!


Right? Wait til you see the rest of the Outdoor Kitchen. She's a beast!


you bringing this to Daniel's!?


I'm sure DK has his grill spit shined for the Matsuhita, Wagyu, or whateva the heck he's got up his sleeve...

True story. Up the lane at a neighbors BBQ, when informed that the guy's old, propane grill won't fire. Headed back to our ranch, with a couple mates, loaded up the Weber Summit into the back of our F-350... Tied her down and rolled into his driveway 10 minutes later. Ended up grilling tri-tip for 40 from the bed! Gave a new meaning to the term "food truck" Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:


You could live in that thing!


Right? Wait til you see the rest of the Outdoor Kitchen. She's a beast!


you bringing this to Daniel's!?


I'm sure DK has his grill spit shined for the Matsuhita, Wagyu, or whateva the heck he's got up his sleeve...

True story. Up the lane at a neighbors BBQ, when informed that the guy's old, propane grill won't fire. Headed back to our ranch, with a couple mates, loaded up the Weber Summit into the back of our F-350... Tied her down and rolled into his driveway 10 minutes later. Ended up grilling tri-tip for 40 from the bed! Gave a new meaning to the term "food truck" Wink


I'm looking into buying a tabletop binchotan hibachi but I think it'll cost me as much as a Weber summit. Time to make myself one out of aluminum.
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:


You could live in that thing!


Right? Wait til you see the rest of the Outdoor Kitchen. She's a beast!


you bringing this to Daniel's!?


I'm sure DK has his grill spit shined for the Matsuhita, Wagyu, or whateva the heck he's got up his sleeve...

True story. Up the lane at a neighbors BBQ, when informed that the guy's old, propane grill won't fire. Headed back to our ranch, with a couple mates, loaded up the Weber Summit into the back of our F-350... Tied her down and rolled into his driveway 10 minutes later. Ended up grilling tri-tip for 40 from the bed! Gave a new meaning to the term "food truck" Wink


I'm looking into buying a tabletop binchotan hibachi but I think it'll cost me as much as a Weber summit. Time to make myself one out of aluminum.


I dunno DK, with that "sword" of a knife and blowtorch in hand... Seems to me you'd have little to no issue cooking anything, anywhere!

PS. Remind me to schedule a "sidekick" trip with you to Tokyo Fish. That BF was amaaaaazing.
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by Vinolocity:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:


You could live in that thing!


Right? Wait til you see the rest of the Outdoor Kitchen. She's a beast!


you bringing this to Daniel's!?


I'm sure DK has his grill spit shined for the Matsuhita, Wagyu, or whateva the heck he's got up his sleeve...

True story. Up the lane at a neighbors BBQ, when informed that the guy's old, propane grill won't fire. Headed back to our ranch, with a couple mates, loaded up the Weber Summit into the back of our F-350... Tied her down and rolled into his driveway 10 minutes later. Ended up grilling tri-tip for 40 from the bed! Gave a new meaning to the term "food truck" Wink


I'm looking into buying a tabletop binchotan hibachi but I think it'll cost me as much as a Weber summit. Time to make myself one out of aluminum.


I dunno DK, with that "sword" of a knife and blowtorch in hand... Seems to me you'd have little to no issue cooking anything, anywhere!

PS. Remind me to schedule a "sidekick" trip with you to Tokyo Fish. That BF was amaaaaazing.


i've heard that a blow torch on a big ass river stone is the best, most romantic way to cook.
quote:
Originally posted by marcb7:
Im in the market for a new grill...something fairly large, 4-6 burners with a side burner etc. Any suggestions? Ive had great luck with Vermont Castings and Weber in the past but after reading Gman's post that Weber is now using inferior steel, I also am a bit upset.


so apparently the way to find out

is goto the store and take a magnet

if it sticks it's inferior steel
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by marcb7:
Im in the market for a new grill...something fairly large, 4-6 burners with a side burner etc. Any suggestions? Ive had great luck with Vermont Castings and Weber in the past but after reading Gman's post that Weber is now using inferior steel, I also am a bit upset.


so apparently the way to find out

is goto the store and take a magnet

if it sticks it's inferior steel


Interesting test. Does this have anything to do with the gauge of the steel?

I'm going to need to go back and check my physics, but if a magnet sticks to "steel," does that suggest that the steel is actually an inferior composite including other metals with some degree of magnetism? Going to Wikipedia this
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by marcb7:
Im in the market for a new grill...something fairly large, 4-6 burners with a side burner etc. Any suggestions? Ive had great luck with Vermont Castings and Weber in the past but after reading Gman's post that Weber is now using inferior steel, I also am a bit upset.


so apparently the way to find out

is goto the store and take a magnet

if it sticks it's inferior steel


Interesting test. Does this have anything to do with the gauge of the steel?

I'm going to need to go back and check my physics, but if a magnet sticks to "steel," does that suggest that the steel is actually an inferior composite including other metals with some degree of magnetism? Going to Wikipedia this


http://www.pennstainless.com/s...00-series-stainless/

http://www.pennstainless.com/s...ies-stainless-steel/

weber went from 304 series to 430 series

Type 304
Used for a wide variety of home and commercial applications. One of the most familiar & frequently used alloys in the stainless steel family. Common applications include Sanitary, Cryogenic, and Pressure-containing applications, Home and commercial appliances, Tank structural parts and processing equipment

Type 430
decorative steel, used for automotive trim; ferritic. Good formability, but with reduced temperature and corrosion resistance.



304. if it's good enuf for a tank, it's good enuf for a weber. and why alot of you old timers say webers last forever.

however the newer models below summit are 430 steel now.
I currently own a Lynx and previously had the Weber Summit (bought 10 years ago)

The Lynx build quality is superior to current Weber models (though on par with my old Summit). I get less flare ups with the Lynx than I did with the Weber.

Having owned the Lynx for ~12 months, I love it. It is bombproof and can get temps >850 degrees. Only downside . . . it is dramatically more expensive than the Weber Summit (though current Summit's use cheaper materials than they did 6+ years ago). Ultimately, I bought the Lynx only because I got an incredible deal on it putting it at about the same price (and actually a little less) than a comparable size Summit
quote:
Originally posted by marcb7:
Is it a cart? Or insert?

Any issues leaving it outside in the winter?


Cart and I love it! I forget the exact dimensions. . . but I think it's 42" (has 2 main burners plus an infrared. Has the rotisserie attachment). On the cart, there are two sliding drawers on the left (one on top of the other) and the two doors on the right opening to the gas-canister compartment. I bought a slider shelf so that I could easily slide the gas canister out).

We had a brutal winter in Boston this year with over 5 feet of snow. There is literally no sign of wear or tear on this cart. It is incredibly heavy gauge steel . . . no rust, no nothing. And, what's more . . . in the middle of winter, I cleared off 3 feet of snow off the grill and it fired right up. Couldn't recommend the Lynx any more highly.

Only other grills in this league that I looked at were:
--Fire Magic: Fantastic grill but even more expensive than the Lynx and no one in my area carries them, so I worried about how I would get it serviced if I had a problem

--Kalamazoo duel fuel: This is my pipe-dream grill. I have seen this once but it was not in use. If you have >$18,000, this is one killer kitchen replacement (if it performs as well as it is advertised). Problem again is that no one in my area carries it so hard to know what the hype is about

--Wolf: Not in the Lynx of above grill league. I can't imagine that Wolf actually makes this grill as opposed to contracts it out and puts their name plate on it. Construction definitely did not seem up to Wolf oven quality

--Kitchen Aid: Seemed like a nice grill with good quality construction. This was not as industrial feeling as the Lynx or Fire Magic and costs about the same as current model Weber Summits. But, again, I eliminated this from consideration only because of the good deal I got on the Lynx otherwise this would have been in contention

--Weber Summit: Actively decided not to get another Weber Summit because the build quality of the new model did not come close to matching the build quality of my older Weber Summit (which is now at my sister's house and chugging along just fine after 10+ years). That said, Weber is a great company to work with, provides excellent customer service, and stands by their product. So, I have no doubt the current model would be great . . . just didn't feel so great. I eliminated this from consideration only because of the Lynx price I got. . . otherwise, I would have been deciding between KitchenAid and Weber

-DCS: saw and used this once at a local BBQ shop. I liked it quite a bit. Uses a different heating element than all the above that is supposed to manage flare ups exceptionally well. I think I passed on this only because I didn't like the cart options the store had in stock for this. But, worth a look
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
--Weber Summit: Actively decided not to get another Weber Summit because the build quality of the new model did not come close to matching the build quality of my older Weber Summit (which is now at my sister's house and chugging along just fine after 10+ years). That said, Weber is a great company to work with, provides excellent customer service, and stands by their product. So, I have no doubt the current model would be great . . . just didn't feel so great. I eliminated this from consideration only because of the Lynx price I got. . . otherwise, I would have been deciding between KitchenAid and Weber


Here's my 2 Cents
I'm ITB of BBQ's
I really like Weber's !!
We carry mostly Broil King and Weber BBQ'S (We have some lower end models) so I cannot comment on the other brands.
Our Customer base is mostly the condo market and apartment market (Being in downtown Montréal)
We do sell some higher models of Weber, I have owned a Genesis and just changed my 2005 Summit 6 burner, still working fine but needs new starter boxes (That is going to be used a our store for events and staff) Just this past weekend I got another Summit 4 burner with rotisserie and side burner. (Got a Smokey Mountain smoker also, very well made !!)

I find that the new ones are a little thinner on the doors and accessory panels. However the cover and base seem on par with my older Summit. I find the overall design to be much more functional and well thought of. They addressed a lot of issues I didn't like (not because I mentioned anything, just noticed that it's better)
The controls were flat before and the snow would freeze the buttons in the winter, now they're vertical, there's also a slope on the control panel that the snow and ice will melt off easier.
A lot of other changes for the positive....

The one thing I like about Weber is they work well and work like new for almost their whole life. My 2005 is just as predictable as when it was new.
Also as stated, the customer service is top notch.
Although their distribution will be changing in Canada, they were distributed along side the Broil King line and now will be handled by their own sales and distribution.
quote:
Originally posted by Vinaigre:


I find that the new ones are a little thinner on the doors and accessory panels. However the cover and base seem on par with my older Summit. I find the overall design to be much more functional and well thought of. They addressed a lot of issues I didn't like (not because I mentioned anything, just noticed that it's better)
The controls were flat before and the snow would freeze the buttons in the winter, now they're vertical, there's also a slope on the control panel that the snow and ice will melt off easier.
A lot of other changes for the positive....

The one thing I like about Weber is they work well and work like new for almost their whole life. My 2005 is just as predictable as when it was new.
Also as stated, the customer service is top notch.
Although their distribution will be changing in Canada, they were distributed along side the Broil King line and now will be handled by their own sales and distribution.


speaking of genesis only

my undersatnding 2008 was the switch over to the cheaper grade of stainless steels. The 2005 ones were built like tanks and remain in good favor. It's the recent new models that have me concerned.

I dont particular take good care of my grills and i'd hate for a 700$ weber genesis to start rusting after 2 years of sitting outside. The older 300 grade steels this wouldn't happen. the 400 grade steels puts it on par with other cheap commercial grills, no matter what gauge /thickness the steel is. Why because that's simply a property of the 400 grade steels. It rusts. It might last, but it will rust. If it's thicker, it just means it'll take longer to rust all the way through. That is my concern because I can just as easily pay 150$ for a cheapo grill i use for 2 years and throw out because it looks ugly and is rusted and buy 4-5 of them over a 10 year period vs a weber tht costs me 800$ and rusts after 2 years.

what do you think Vinaigre?
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
what do you think Vinaigre?


I've sold quite a few Genesis.
I've never had any issues about rusting, and we are in Québec. Even the most recent ones.
That being said, I'm confident that the $800.00 weber will outlast 4 $200.00 BBQ's. Plus as I mentioned in 8 years it will still be working almost like new.

One of the known qualities of Weber is their enameling. That IMO hasn't changed.

What you have to keep clean is the insides. If you don't clean it out once and a while all the crap just corrodes the burners. Weber's burners are very resistant. But a good cleaning will help it last.
Like I mentioned, my 2005 runs almost like new, but the lighter boxes corroded out. they are in the open so all the fat and sauces just ate tru the stainless... Another issue that they improved.
I'll add:

The thing that kills all the cheap BBQ in the past is that the burners were in the shape of an H or 8.
The exposed portion of the burner that was under the food but not covered by the heat diffusers or flavoriser bars just rusted by the acidity of the sauces and combination of heat, even if it's stainless.

Now most manufactures have changed to tubular burners under a heat plate or triangular bars (Flavoriser bar as Weber calls them)

Those heat diffuser plates in the lower end BBQ go quick but are cheap to replace.

Keep that in mind when choosing. Design is important because ultimately its the insides that go first.

Just think of all the BBQ relics you see on the curb, they look ok till you see that all the guts are finished.
quote:
Originally posted by Vinaigre:
What you have to keep clean is the insides. If you don't clean it out once and a while all the crap just corrodes the burners. Weber's burners are very resistant. But a good cleaning will help it last.

So, I'm a dumbo that just grills and really doesn't do any cleaning. And, I don't even know how to go about cleaning the insides. Perhaps I just need to look at the manual (wherever it is) for care instructions, but do you just take the grates off and start scrubbing away at the inside? I would imagine there is some sort of recommendation of cleaning agents to use (or more importantly, not to use).
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Dan cleans his every year I believe so he could probably answer this. But the lazy MF'er only checks the forums when he smells an offline. Wink


Mrs. TLV was just saying tonight that it's been awhile since we've had everyone over. She suggested we fire up the smoker and drink some pinot in the near future with the locals.
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Dan cleans his every year I believe so he could probably answer this. But the lazy MF'er only checks the forums when he smells an offline. Wink

I'm reading up on it now based on the manual, seems pretty simple...just need to get to it. Although I do wonder to what extent others go to (i.e. grates, flavorizer bars, and inside grill cavity, or go through everything such as burner tubes, etc.).

I notice that you mentioned how often Dan cleans his, but you don't mention cleaning yours at all!
quote:
Originally posted by Wine Sparty:
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Dan cleans his every year I believe so he could probably answer this. But the lazy MF'er only checks the forums when he smells an offline. Wink

I'm reading up on it now based on the manual, seems pretty simple...just need to get to it. Although I do wonder to what extent others go to (i.e. grates, flavorizer bars, and inside grill cavity, or go through everything such as burner tubes, etc.).

I notice that you mentioned how often Dan cleans his, but you don't mention cleaning yours at all!


WS -- I don't clean every year, but try to make an effort to clean every few years or as needed (e.g., if I see that any of the burners appear to be clogged). For me, cleaning has always been pretty simple (takes less than an hour).
1) Scrape any obvious oil, burnt food off surfaces
2) Take a stiff wire brush and brush over the burners to ensure that none of the gas "holes" are clogged

With my old Summit, after 7 years, I did hire a local BBQ ship to come out and do an over-haul on the Weber. They took the insides apart, identified a few parts that were worn and needed replacing, gave me the part numbers so I could contact Weber, and showed me how to re-install once I received the parts). My semi-regular cleanings kept the grill working well, but this over-haul brought it back to its original cooking state. Cost was ~$150 for what took 1 guy 2 hours of work and was well worth it
quote:
Originally posted by Wine Sparty:
, but you don't mention cleaning yours at all!

Usually only if enough gunk collects to cause a big flare-up, which happened recently after having 8 links of Italian sausage going. The propane was getting low in the one tank, so I let it burn at 600 for a half hour or so. Soon I'll get around to scraping out what is left over. Or not. Big Grin
Well today was our event at the store.
My old Summit cooked 300 hamburgers and 300 costco hotdogs.
Still works great !

The cleaning you all mentioned is all that's needed.
A good scraping with a flat wall scraper and brushing.
If you want to get really fancy a shot of oven cleaner then a good rince with the hose, but after you need to wash the whole cart and all with a degreaser.

A good trick for the grills is to stick them in your oven on a grill when you auto clean.
I had 3 oven grills that came with my oven and I only used 2 so I sacrificed one for cleaning my BBQ grills.
(The auto clean makes the oven grills lose their lustre, the BBQ grills lose their luster after the first BBQ)
Last edited by vinaigre
Very timely post by WineSparty.

I got a text from my wife that she had to use the fire extinguisher on my Weber because there was a grease fire out of control. I hadn't cleaned it in about 3-4 years, that animal debris does build up! (it's all carbon anyways)

When I got home I went at it- took off the grates, took off the flavor bars (not very dirty), then pushed as much debris as possible into the middle and slid that middle piece out and dumped it into a garbage bag. I scraped the insides quite a bit and cleaned the undersides of the grate quite a bit too. I then put it all back together and fired her up (still on the first click after 10+ years). Looks great again. I know this will shift the hot spots a little, there are definitely variances in there but I'll figure it out fast.

Have I mentioned that I love my Weber?
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
Still weber?

looking for a small one since i have a smoker and a charcoal grill already.

one that cooks evenly but mostly for things like hotdogs and chicken.

I saw kitchenaid has a nice one for 499$ that has same specs as the weber genesis 330 (which is 799$)

any thoughts?


I sold kitchenaid appliances, and I've seen the kitchenaid grill. They are not in the small ballpark imo. The kitchenaid grills we sold were actually made by Nextgrill and very similar when put next to one another. Both brands only lasted one summer. Go with an all stainless Weber and call it a day.
quote:
Originally posted by marcb7:
I bit the bullet and bought the Weber Summit 670....really wanted a built in Lynx, but will make do with this for a few years. So far I am very satisfied.


Had a Weber Summit for 8 years and bought a Lynx about 3 years ago (mostly because it came with a full cabinet and drawers and was a floor model at Sur La Table and I got it at 50% less than retail)

Long story short . . . I would be hard pressed to say the Lynx is any better than the Summit. The Weber Summit is incredibly solid. My sister has it now and it is bomb proof. She had to replace the lid, all the burners (which had a few holes in them after 10+ years of high heat cooking), the temp gauge on the lid, and the side burner because the gas line got gunked up. All parts were 100% warrantied by Weber and came with idiot-proof instructions to self-install

I like the Lynx a lot but I have had to replace the light assembly and one of the burners after 3 years to the tune of $400. It's definitely a solid piece of equipment and the gauge of steel will outlast a Weber from what the repair guy told me . . . But, Weber customer service is un-paralleled. And, as far as the cooking quality goes . . . the two are identical

Lynx is a nice piece of equipment if you can get a great deal on it. Otherwise, you could get a Weber Summit, replace it in 10 years with a new one and be spending the same amount of money as if you had bought a Lynx new
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
I'm looking at replacing my 22-year old Ducane grill for this summer. I like the Weber Genesis, but am presently wondering whether it's worth the extra tariff to get the Summit series. Either way, a stainless steel, natural gas model with side burner-- I'm hoping it'll be the last BBQ I'll ever have to buy. Smile


Seaquam, Other than the Stainless V/S Enameled steel the difference between Genesis and Summit is the size and amount of bells and whistles. The construction is the same.
Genesis are 3 main burners and Summits are 4 or 6 main burners.

If you are looking at Enamelled it's very resistant as long as you don't dent it, and even then they resist well.
I had my Black Genesis for 10+ years and gave it to my Brother in law and he had it for another 5+ years.

I'm on my second Summit and the first one is 10 years and still going. We use it for lunches and events at our store.

I find their designs to have improved to the point if you maintain your BBQ it will last at least 15 years with no issues.

The one thing I like is their service. Should you need parts under warranty it's never a problem.

Feel free to contact me if you want more info!
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
I'm looking at replacing my 22-year old Ducane grill for this summer. I like the Weber Genesis, but am presently wondering whether it's worth the extra tariff to get the Summit series. Either way, a stainless steel, natural gas model with side burner-- I'm hoping it'll be the last BBQ I'll ever have to buy. Smile


Hey if you can handle the price, and have the room, go for the Summit.
ive been a Weber fan all my life... we just moved and my 10+ y/o Genesis didn't survive the trip and instead of re-upping another i ended up getting a Broil King. now, i've only had the grill for about 3 weeks but so far i'm extremely impressed. build quality seems to be on par with Weber and for a measurable amount of less money. same warranty as Weber too. if you're in the market for a Weber i'd seriously consider Broil King... and Seaquam, they are made in Canada! Wink

http://www.broilkingbbq.com/grills/signet/signet_320
I too am in the market for a gas grill, but I'm really confused about this "Infrared Technology" feature that some grills have now. I've read up on it online a little bit, but I guess I'm obtuse and still not getting it... What is it all about and is it worth getting?? I'm not looking to spend a bunch of money as I really only need to get at most 5 years out of a grill, but I'd like it to cook well while I do have it. I'm looking at this off-brand one from the Home Depot, but I can't tell if this infrared thing is a ploy or whether it will help me cook better food. Here is a link to the grill I'm looking at:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Nex...-720-0882A/206362558
quote:
Originally posted by RVARob:
I too am in the market for a gas grill, but I'm really confused about this "Infrared Technology" feature that some grills have now. I've read up on it online a little bit, but I guess I'm obtuse and still not getting it... What is it all about and is it worth getting?? I'm not looking to spend a bunch of money as I really only need to get at most 5 years out of a grill, but I'd like it to cook well while I do have it. I'm looking at this off-brand one from the Home Depot, but I can't tell if this infrared thing is a ploy or whether it will help me cook better food. Here is a link to the grill I'm looking at:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Nex...-720-0882A/206362558


infrared just means someone stuck something between the fire and your food.

like if you were to use your stove top, the pots and pans in the way of the fire cooking your food directly
quote:
Originally posted by Red guy in a blue state:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
my charcoal grill doesnt have them fancy "infrared burners"

sears just fine ;-)


Big Grin My gas grill fires up with the push of a button. No need for matches and a charcoal chimney. Razz


haha, it's called a 6 pack of beer
the food is more flavorable after people have been drinking =)
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
Ours rusted out last weekend - need to replace. Will probably get another cheapie - last one lasted 5.5 years


That's what we just did. Since I don't have a big porch, it sits outside with a cover and can't fathom spending big $ on one. Florida humidity is never kind to anything anyway..even covered.

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