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others ban this as well. There are creative ways around it. While on a business trip in MD last year found a great spot but no corkage and their list was lacking depth (only newer vintages). Long story short on first visit spoke with owner, on second visit 2 days later I gave him a bottle as a gift, wasnt i surpirsed when he decided to share his gift with me.
quote:
Originally posted by Sleepyhaus:
So I just found out today that Kansas City Missouri has a city ordinance against bringing bottles into restaurants. Are there other cities which do this, or is this an isolated incident?


My whole state has that law in effect. My advice is get to know the managers at your favorite restaurant let them know what a wine geek you are and see if they will let you bring one in on the down low. If they do don't abuse in and always order a wine off of their list, a white to start the night. Also make sure to share your wine with the manager and your server, I always give at least a glass per bottle between the staff.
snipes, I am from the good side of the state and I plan to return, for me this is a temporary exile, and I'm in school right now so we don't go out to eat as much. Really the dining scene here leaves something to be desired here anyway, aside from BBQ, so no real harm. The upside is my own cooking gets better and better. Still, for my own B-day I had hoped go out, now probably not.
I also live in KC and have that told to me before Sleepy. However, I have found out that it is a blatant lie and have called out some restaurant owners on it. It is the restaurant's decision whether or not to allow corkage. I choose to dine at the specific locations that allow this practice. If you don't mind me asking where did you attempt to bring your bottle to?
realdeal, I just did some research and I am afraid that it is indeed a city ordinance, Sec. 10-335, stating that it is illegal for a licensee to allow a customer to bring wine onto the premises. Some may look the other way, but there doesn't even seem to be any exceptions or wiggle room. Of course restaurant owners will say that BYO would cost them money, but really I feel that not allowing BYO is costing money b/c I am far less inclined to go out to eat here now. Why should I pay a 100%+ mark up for wine that is worse than what I had wanted to drink? When I lived in STL I always bought white or by-the-glass, plus often we would get martinis or brandy with dessert, so it isn't as if I wouldn't buy plenty. Now I will probably eat and then head home for the wine I really want.
quote:
Originally posted by Sleepyhaus:
So I just found out today that Kansas City Missouri has a city ordinance against bringing bottles into restaurants.


I don't about the regulations concerning restaurants, but I do know for sure that the women there are small and demented, and that there are certain street corners where the local wine can be consumed safely in public. Unlike politicians, songwriters never lie.


I'm going to Kansas City
Kansas City here I come
I'm going to Kansas City
Kansas City here I come
They got some crazy little women there
And I'm gonna get me one

I'm gonna be standing on the corner
Twelfth Street and Vine
I'm gonna be standing on the corner
Twelfth Street and Vine
With my Kansas City baby
And a bottle of Kansas City wine
I won't argue with what the ordinance states, but I will list the restaurants I personally have brought a bottle to in the past three years. Michael Smith's, Makers Mark, Capital Grille, Mortons, Aixois, Garozzos, Brio, Bristol, Plaza III, and Bluestem just to name a few. I just place a courteous call beforehand asking if they have a corkage fee. The only place that informed me of this ordinance was the late Tom Macaluso of Macaluso's. Funny thing though, he still told me to bring my own. LOL
This is also the law throughout Maryland. If the restaurant has a license to sell wine, they are not supposed to permit you to bring yours. This is a product of the strength of the liquor industry, which wants to protect its market.
Legislation was introduced last year to change this, I think. I believe it will be reintroduced this year. It will probably fail again because the liquor interests contribute large sums to the politicians in what is a form of legalized bribery.

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