How to spot a fake alcoholic beverage?

Hey everyone! Fake foods had already emerged and I think there are fake wines too. I'm curious on how to spot a fake one. I've mentioned before that I'm working in a wine company and soon my husband would like to pursue a wine shop. This is not only for wine dealers but also for consumers safety. But, are you aware about the policies on alcoholic beverages safety? Would you mind giving me some pointers in managing scenarios related to wine quality and safety risk ?

Your ideas can be a big help to everyone who are into same industry. I'll be grateful about it!
Original Post
Fake wines are a very real issue, but it is usually a problem in the high end wine market, and not as much of a problem with more moderately or lower priced wines. The reason being that there is a much greater reward for counterfeiting expensive wines. It can be extremely difficult to detect a fake wine from the real thing. Before you can spot a fake, you need to know what the real wine looks like. Obviously, if you have a bottle of Chateau Latour with a screw cap, you know it's fake, but the fakes are never that obvious. If you have Netflix, I would suggest watching the movie "Sour Grapes" which looks into the life of the world's most famous wine counterfeiter.

My suggestion- only buy from reputable sources, but even the most reputable can be fooled.
By "fake" do you mean counterfeit where the wine has a label that says one thing but it's really something else? Or do you mean that it's not even really wine made from fermented grapes?

As far as counterfeit wine, I wouldn't worry about it. If you're going to open a wine shop, you will source from licensed distributors. As long as the wine hasn't come from China, you're probably OK. You won't be buying from individuals who tell you that they found a secret stash somewhere, or from individuals who want to unload a few bottles.

As far as "spotting" them, that's a crapshoot. The movie mentioned has a few people who've used that story to make their reputations. One in particular said that you can never know a fake wine by tasting it, you have to look at the packaging and do chemical analysis of the glue, glass, paper, ink and even the wine, and she knows more about that than you do so you have to call her.

Again, I wouldn't worry about it. You're not going to be selling small lots of rare wine, at least right off the bat.
quote:
Originally posted by Winedrmike:
Fake wines are a very real issue, but it is usually a problem in the high end wine market, and not as much of a problem with more moderately or lower priced wines. The reason being that there is a much greater reward for counterfeiting expensive wines. It can be extremely difficult to detect a fake wine from the real thing. Before you can spot a fake, you need to know what the real wine looks like. Obviously, if you have a bottle of Chateau Latour with a screw cap, you know it's fake, but the fakes are never that obvious. If you have Netflix, I would suggest watching the movie "Sour Grapes" which looks into the life of the world's most famous wine counterfeiter.

My suggestion- only buy from reputable sources, but even the most reputable can be fooled.


Your points are actual correct what is the present thing happens in world, yes i watched that Sour Grapes - very informative film

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