How far in advance do you rub your brisket?

I typically do it 4-5 days before.
My dry brine mix is crushed juniper berries, black peppercorns, lots of salt, dill. I put it in a big plastic bag and keep it in the fridge flipping every day.
add saltpeter if you like a "pink" color.
Let is soak in it's own juices.

before i put it on the smoker, rinse it off with water and pat dry with a paper towel.

then put the dry rub that i'm going to use for the crust. Brown sugar, paprika, garlic, onion.

if i forgo the dry brine, it's the same dry rub but with salt added in the day of

I use the 1 hour of smoke, 2-4 hours of covered and last hour of uncovered on my weber.

i like #1 because it has that great jewish pastrami taste. but i go with #2 if i want more of a cleaner beef taste.
Usually I trim the fat cap to 1/4", rub it the night before, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate. Unless you plan on doing a basic salt & pepper, then you can rub just prior to putting it on the bbq.
I smoke at a temp of 225° to 240° until it reaches an internal temperature of 195°. Or, try the toothpick test: when done, a toothpick should be able to slide into it like warm butter. Every chunk of meat is different, but a good rule of thumb is 1-1/2 hours per pound. You can't rush it. I've had a 15 lb brisket take over 25 hours. Good woods to use with beef are oak, cherry, pecan, or hickory if you use it judiciously.
Pull it off when ready, double or triple wrap it in foil (if you haven't done so already), wrap again in towels, and place the whole thing in an empty ice chest, to rest for a few hours. Slice immediately before serving.
Good luck! Cool
Some of you jokers have done a real nice job at demonstrating some real restraint! We're talking about rubbing your meat here, and you've all been well behaved! Bravo! Razz

I picked up the meat yesterday and the butcher handed over a beautiful, but HUGE 15 pounder. It's the flat and the point, all in one cut.

Would you brisket masters advice separating the flat and point, or just keeping them as one and smoking it that way?
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
Some of you jokers have done a real nice job at demonstrating some real restraint! We're talking about rubbing your meat here, and you've all been well behaved! Bravo! Razz

I picked up the meat yesterday and the butcher handed over a beautiful, but HUGE 15 pounder. It's the flat and the point, all in one cut.

Would you brisket masters advice separating the flat and point, or just keeping them as one and smoking it that way?


Recommend separating for 2 reasons:
1) Flat cut is generally going to be not as thick as the point cut so it would be hard to get even cooking across both parts. By the time the point cut is cooked, the flat cut will be overcooked

2) Point cut should have much more marbling so is going to really benefit from low and slow cooking. Flat cut also works well low and slow, but I've just not be able to get the tenderness that I've gotten from a point cut b/c it's generally a leaner part of the cut

2 Cents
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
Some of you jokers have done a real nice job at demonstrating some real restraint! We're talking about rubbing your meat here, and you've all been well behaved! Bravo! Razz

I picked up the meat yesterday and the butcher handed over a beautiful, but HUGE 15 pounder. It's the flat and the point, all in one cut.

Would you brisket masters advice separating the flat and point, or just keeping them as one and smoking it that way?


Recommend separating for 2 reasons:
1) Flat cut is generally going to be not as thick as the point cut so it would be hard to get even cooking across both parts. By the time the point cut is cooked, the flat cut will be overcooked

2) Point cut should have much more marbling so is going to really benefit from low and slow cooking. Flat cut also works well low and slow, but I've just not be able to get the tenderness that I've gotten from a point cut b/c it's generally a leaner part of the cut

2 Cents


i suck at cooking the flat

I've had slightly better luck with roasting it
but not muc
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
Some of you jokers have done a real nice job at demonstrating some real restraint! We're talking about rubbing your meat here, and you've all been well behaved! Bravo! Razz

I picked up the meat yesterday and the butcher handed over a beautiful, but HUGE 15 pounder. It's the flat and the point, all in one cut.

Would you brisket masters advice separating the flat and point, or just keeping them as one and smoking it that way?


Recommend separating for 2 reasons:
1) Flat cut is generally going to be not as thick as the point cut so it would be hard to get even cooking across both parts. By the time the point cut is cooked, the flat cut will be overcooked

2) Point cut should have much more marbling so is going to really benefit from low and slow cooking. Flat cut also works well low and slow, but I've just not be able to get the tenderness that I've gotten from a point cut b/c it's generally a leaner part of the cut

2 Cents


i suck at cooking the flat

I've had slightly better luck with roasting it
but not muc


Try steaming it like a pastrami. Then you can add the char on the grill after if you so like.
quote:
Originally posted by Danyull:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
Some of you jokers have done a real nice job at demonstrating some real restraint! We're talking about rubbing your meat here, and you've all been well behaved! Bravo! Razz

I picked up the meat yesterday and the butcher handed over a beautiful, but HUGE 15 pounder. It's the flat and the point, all in one cut.

Would you brisket masters advice separating the flat and point, or just keeping them as one and smoking it that way?


Recommend separating for 2 reasons:
1) Flat cut is generally going to be not as thick as the point cut so it would be hard to get even cooking across both parts. By the time the point cut is cooked, the flat cut will be overcooked

2) Point cut should have much more marbling so is going to really benefit from low and slow cooking. Flat cut also works well low and slow, but I've just not be able to get the tenderness that I've gotten from a point cut b/c it's generally a leaner part of the cut

2 Cents


i suck at cooking the flat

I've had slightly better luck with roasting it
but not muc


Try steaming it like a pastrami. Then you can add the char on the grill after if you so like.


you end up with a chunk of meat that tastesl ike a rock

the only luck i have wtiht eh flat is to cut it up for stir fry and adding corn starch to it
I have smoked both together and separate, and not had much difference either way. BTW the therm goes in the flat, so you are not overcooking it. The point, being much more marbled, does not need to come to the full 195° to be tender, and can be removed when the flat is done. The only advantage I have found to separating them, is a shorter cooking time.
Note that the bbq pros trim the deckle fat in between, but do not separate.
It turned out extremely well - lots of comments about how I'm not committed for every year hereafter...which is fine with me. And...I gotta get a Treager. That thing is the bomb. Made it so easy.

I kept the brisket whole and trimmed a ton of fat off. I did indeed find that hard part of fat that mneeley490 called the "deckle fat" and cut a lot of that out, too. Rubbed it at about 8:00 p.m. on Thursday night. We also had a flat cut only donated the day before, so we decided to cook that too.

The big guy went on at 4:00 a.m., cold, straight from the fridge. I read in several spots that a cold piece of meat takes on more smoke. Plus, I wasn't getting up at 2:00 and 4:00 a.m. Went on at 225 degrees with mesquite. We threw the additional flat cut on at about 9:00 a.m. We were trucking along well, but hit a bit of a stall at around 155-160 degrees, but it was only about 11:00 a.m. I took them both out, wrapped them tightly in foil, and back in they went. We timed the cooking well, as both the whole brisket and the flat were at 195-200 right around the same time. We took them out at 3:00 and put them, still wrapped, into an ice chest lined with towels and wrapped them tightly. Amazingly, at 7:00, we removed them and they were still almost too hot to handle with bare hands. I wish I would've done pics. The smoke ring was a thing of beauty, and it was so tender and juicy. The flat cut of the whole brisket had a more classic brisket texture, while the point was more tender and clearly more fatty. It's amazing that two adjacent cuts of meat have perpendicular grains, so we sparated the two cuts before slicing.

This was the rub I sued (thanks to Oklahoma Joe), and it was killer:

1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons garlic powder
2 tablespoons onion powder
2 tablespoons Spanish paprika
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 tablespoon celery salt
1 tablespoon lemon pepper
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper


Thanks again for all the advice! We have leftovers (after two meals) and are making chili with it next week.

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