Admittedly, it's probably one of the least "wine friendly" condiments out there. I just had a dinner of leftover shredded beef enchiladas (one of Mrs. PH's absolute best contributions to our kitchen) and pulled a bottle of what has become my absolute favorite Hot Sauce out of the fridge to give them a little extra "boost."

I discovered Susie's Hot Sauce in Antigua trying to pump some life into what was a nice, but bland goad curry roti. The waitress recommended the "Calypso" version, and I have had it in my collection ever since. A great combination of serious heat with great rich flavor. The waitress actually ran to town and brought me 2 bottles to take back home (at least that's what she told me Razz) and was paid handsomely for the score!

There are a lot of hot sauces out there which taste like prig kee nu soaked in gasoline, but combining heat and flavor makes for the best hot sauce. Any recommendations?

PH
Original Post
Hot sauce is not at all wine unfriendly, though in excess, it certainly is. I use several different ones in moderation to flavor sauces frequently. In special dishes, I often eschew the use of hot sauces and use several types of chilis. Ancho is not too hot and adds a nice flavor. Chipotle is pretty hot, but a touch adds nice flavor to sauces.
quote:
Posts: 9210 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001

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I am only familiar with Cholua (sp?)...it's thick and just right...not like Tabasco where you have to shake the bottle to death to get a few drops.
PH, I would give "Melinda's Hot Sauce" a try. Like Susie's, it's habanero-based and without that heavy vinegary taste that so many hot sauces seem to do. It packs a punch but with lots of flavor, think you'll like it. Smile

Youndo
I really like the Chili sauce that comes in a clear plastic bottle with a green, pointed cap and a big rooster on the front. A lot of the writing is in Chinese and is all in white ink. I'm not sure what it's called, but we all just refer to it as Hot Cock (because of the rooster on the label, of course). Great flavor and not too over-the-top hot. Mix it with a little cream cheese for a nice Spicy Tuna Roll sauce.
quote:
Originally posted by ArieS:

Stupid song but who cares though?


I have no idea how and where I found this video, but this girl is certainly cute. What is she, 13-14 years old? Ah, the French, Roll Eyes they know how to exploit their children's assets. Big Grin
I have a weak spot for hot sauces...I've got between 150 and 200 different ones...Eek

One of the most complex (and not too hot) is Jump Up And Kiss Me. For a nice kick, I like Tapatio Sala Picante or Bufalo Chipotle (from Mexico). Dave's Gourmet Insanity Sauce was quite tasty as well, and I have a bottle of his Total Insanity Sauce, that I still have to try.
I think I'm most proud Roll Eyes of my bottle of Da'Bomb Beyond Insanity - I hope to add their Ground Zero to the collection one time: supposed to be the hottest sauce on Earth!

A GREAT hot sauce is made in London: the Cool Chile Co. Habanaro Hot Sauce. I bought some bottles at the Borough Market, but have yet a single one remaining.
My stomach can't take those sauces that score a gazillion on the heat index anymore.
I'll stick to Tabasco red and green, thanks.
mneeley490,

There are plenty of sauces out there that combine reasonable heat with a lot more flavor than Tabasco. I keep a bottle of each (red and green) in my collection, but try some of the habanero based sauces mentioned here. They provide a warmer more rounded heat with a lot more flavor. Tabasco is a little "sharp" in comparison.

PH
quote:
BRR -

The chili sauce you refer to is likely sambal oelek, a Vietnamese chili sauce. I keep it on hand and use it often (mix it with Mr.Yoshida's original sauce and you have a real nice marinade).


More than likely it's Sriracha

from the same maker. And it's made in the USA!!

PH
PH -

After re-reading BRR's post, I missed the "white lettering" part, so you are right. It is the Sriracha. A lot of times it is on the table at Vietnamese restaurants. It is a little different than Sambal, but also very good.
quote:
I have a weak spot for hot sauces...I've got between 150 and 200 different ones


Eek

Where do you keep them?? I keep my opened bottles (only eight at this time) in the fridge. I'd need a new one for that many bottles!!

PH
Atleast in this part of the country, Sriracha is sold in the "ethnic" part of the grocery stores like Kroger and Target but the markup is 100%. You can buy it at the Vietnamese grocery store for $2 but at the American grocery store it is $4. Frown
As PH said, there are a lot of good hot sauces available these days.

My [current] favorite is Chrystal Classic Habanero Sauce, made by Baumer Foods in New Orleans. I don't know how widely distributed it is, but it's worth seeking out.

This wakes up any stew or soup you put it in. It delivers a slow burn that clearly isn't wine-friendly, but loves to wrassle with a good cold beer for a while. Smile
The hottest hot sauce I know of is Dave's Maximum (or is it Total?) Insanity Sauce. One drop is sufficient for an entire meal. It tastes good, though.

Less spicy but also really good is Dave's Hurtin' Habenaro.

My favorite of all time is Maui Tacos Pineapple Chipotle sauce. Not too spicy, but adds lots of flavor. Sadly, I can only get it when I go to Hawaii and I ran out almost a year ago.

There are lots of other I like -- but the most consistent thing is that most hot sauces I enjoy are based upon chipotle or habenaro, not cayenne.

a
PurleHaze-

That's the stuff! Made in the USA, too. They do a pretty good job covering that up. I guess I've never been inquisitive enough to look at the label very closely.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
My [current] favorite is Chrystal Classic Habanero Sauce, made by Baumer Foods in New Orleans. I don't know how widely distributed it is, but it's worth seeking out.


I'm with you. I can't do Tabasco at all anymore, too much vinegar. You can find Crystal (most varieties) almost anywhere in the states, in your grocery. Are you finding it in Vancouver?

I recently bought a bottle of St. Thomas "God's Vineyard" 7-Pepper hot sauce from some very enterprising boys at our Farmer's Market and I love it.
You'll never find it. It is made by these young men who grow the peppers in a community garden, then produce the sauce. All the sale proceeds support the garden and provide collage scholarships for kids from the St. Thomas Housing Development in New Orleans. Maybe they ship -- 504-529-6981

We must have 20 bottles going all the time, but I always reach for this one or the Crystal.
quote:
Originally posted by Queen Of Hearts:
You can find Crystal (most varieties) almost anywhere in the states, in your grocery. Are you finding it in Vancouver?


No, not available here as far as I know. We brought some back from NO, used it up, and last month a friend was kind enough to fulfill my request to bring some back from a business trip. Unfortunately, he just brought one 5-oz. bottle, but beggars can't be choosers. I ration it out carefully now. Smile
I like Crystal as well; fortunately I can find it here - but just the regular hot sauce. I see that I do have a bottle of the Classic Habareno; I'll give it a try soon!
had this at a restaurant somewhere in ny, escapes me right now.

1 tblsp Sriracha
1/2 tblsp melted butter
broiled lobster meat.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Thanks for the link! Love the stuff.

Same here. I always keep some on hand; occasionally the kids will try to test their bravery by using some.
I especially like a good dollop mixed in my Pho. Smile
There's a place down in Puerto Vallarta that makes a shrimp ceviche in aguachile that is heaven on earth. I don't exactly what's in it, but I'd bring it back by the barrel if I could. I does have some heat to it, but it's the amazing fruit flavor of the chile coming through that my daughter and I love. We have to stop in every time we go there.
I had it on some sauteed broccolini the other night. May not have the burn but packs the flavor.

For heat+flavor I have been using the El Yucateco XXXTRA HOT SAUCE and the ZAASCHILA GUACAMOLE Con Chile Habanero.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
had this at a restaurant somewhere in ny, escapes me right now.

1 tblsp Sriracha
1/2 tblsp melted butter
broiled lobster meat.


Thanks g-man. I came into some lobster meat courtesy of east coast relatives. I substituted the garlic chili sauce though and loved it.
quote:
Originally posted by Adam10:
Does anyone like Franks?

I had a coupon for a free bottle, so I picked one up last week. Tried it on buffalo wings the other night, and I have to say that it was very tasty. More flavor than heat, I guess that's what I like.
The red chili sauce is lousy, imo. I like the one that you get in good Chinese restaurants. I've found it in an Asian market near us. Great chili sauce adds a lot to Asian food.
Back in 1998 a former friend of mine grabbed a bottle of After Death and poured himself a heaping teaspoon of it and immediately swallowed it despite my disbelief and active warning. 15 minutes later he was a snivelling, bawling, sweating puffball of redness and swelling. From that point on I now always keep some of the latest nasty-in-a-bottle stuff around tableside just in case... Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
Back in 1998 a former friend of mine grabbed a bottle of After Death and poured himself a heaping teaspoon of it and immediately swallowed it despite my disbelief and active warning. 15 minutes later he was a snivelling, bawling, sweating puffball of redness and swelling. From that point on I now always keep some of the latest nasty-in-a-bottle stuff around tableside just in case... Smile

There's always one guy in a crowd that thinks he can take it. I love that guy! Big Grin

Let's revisit THIS guy.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
Back in 1998 a former friend of mine grabbed a bottle of After Death and poured himself a heaping teaspoon of it and immediately swallowed it despite my disbelief and active warning. 15 minutes later he was a snivelling, bawling, sweating puffball of redness and swelling. From that point on I now always keep some of the latest nasty-in-a-bottle stuff around tableside just in case... Smile

There's always one guy in a crowd that thinks he can take it. I love that guy! Big Grin

Let's revisit THIS guy.


Beautiful!!
We formed a cult around "Dave's Insanity Sauce" meals back in college. Each of us crowded around a table with a full gallon of milk and Taco's drenched in Dave's. Great stuff! (though not recommended that you rub your eyes when crying like I did... Dave's in the eye is an unpleasant experience).
Szechuan hot pepper oil.
2 cups worth

1/4 lb dried red chilies(hatch if not to spice, thai small red for extra spicy)

or you can buy them fresh.

1/4 cup of sichaun peppercorns
1 star anise
1 tea spoon of ginger
1 tea spoon of cinnamon
1 tea spoon of white pepper
(a take on the chiense 5 spice)
1 tbl spoon of salt

put in two cups of peanut oil, with spices.

Heat oil up

insert dried chilies.
As they start turning color, add sichaun peppercorn.

fry dried chilies and peppercorn until they're crunchy (and blackish)

turn off heat, take chilis and peppercorn out of oil and into mortar and pestle.

grind fine and put back into oil.

let cool and store it in jar.

Keep in fridge, stores for up to a year.
A friend of mine recently gifted me a small jar he made of what might be one of the best hot sauces i've had. its a cooked sauce, the usual onions, garlic etc - but for peppers he grew about a dozen different types of varying heat in his garden this summer - then smoked them, then charred and peeled the skin before use. Finished with cilantro and lime and i cant stop eating it. ive gone so far as to just drip it on bread.
quote:
Originally posted by vinoevelo:
A friend of mine recently gifted me a small jar he made of what might be one of the best hot sauces i've had. its a cooked sauce, the usual onions, garlic etc - but for peppers he grew about a dozen different types of varying heat in his garden this summer - then smoked them, then charred and peeled the skin before use. Finished with cilantro and lime and i cant stop eating it. ive gone so far as to just drip it on bread.

Sounds like homemade West Indies pepper sauce. In the Richmond Hill area in Queens the stores sell both homemade (no label) and commercially-made (I like Matouk's) sauces.
similar to west indies, but without the mango/banana fruit aspect. The closest thing I can think of is Chilean pebre, pureed, with a bit more heat.
quote:
Originally posted by PD2K:
quote:
Originally posted by vinoevelo:
A friend of mine recently gifted me a small jar he made of what might be one of the best hot sauces i've had. its a cooked sauce, the usual onions, garlic etc - but for peppers he grew about a dozen different types of varying heat in his garden this summer - then smoked them, then charred and peeled the skin before use. Finished with cilantro and lime and i cant stop eating it. ive gone so far as to just drip it on bread.

Sounds like homemade West Indies pepper sauce. In the Richmond Hill area in Queens the stores sell both homemade (no label) and commercially-made (I like Matouk's) sauces.


you golf?

i goto forest park a few times

i can shwo you how bad my swing is!
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
In special dishes, I often eschew the use of hot sauces and use several types of chilis.


FYI, "the use of" is not required verbiage to proceed the word "eschew" Roll Eyes

Additionally, my home grown, hybrid chilis have been used in champion winning chili cook-offs, and my chipotle hot sauce is to die for, absolutely! Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Wine and Food Expert:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
In special dishes, I often eschew the use of hot sauces and use several types of chilis.


FYI, "the use of" is not required verbiage to proceed the word "eschew" Roll Eyes

Additionally, my home grown, hybrid chilis have been used in champion winning chili cook-offs, and my chipotle hot sauce is to die for, absolutely! Smile


Shag off. You suck.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by Wine and Food Expert:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
In special dishes, I often eschew the use of hot sauces and use several types of chilis.


FYI, "the use of" is not required verbiage to proceed the word "eschew" Roll Eyes

In WaFE's little grammar lesson above, it's clear he/she/it has confused proceed with precede. The best part is, neither is correct because follow is actually the right word in context. Absolutely!

Tabasco Scorpion Sauce is what Tabasco should be. Instantly recognizable as Tabasco but with actual heat. A little thicker and has guava in it (you can't tell just adds some body and sweetness). It's not hot but it's a real hot sauce as opposed to a pepper vinegar that regular tabasco is. 

Very highly recommended.  

I switched some time ago to a milder brand, Cholula, as it's no fun anymore waking up in the middle of the night with acid reflux. But I had some regular Tabasco on eggs in a restaurant recently, and it really did seem like a vinegar sauce. I didn't remember it tasting like that.

fermenting a pint of mixed peppers in brine - jalapeno's, scotch bonets, cubanelle etc etc in the basement.  Should be ready ~end of January.  

My go to is Cholula. I love the taste. 

I’ve enjoyed many others when *heat* was the goal. Dave’s hot sauces, for example. 

But really, Cholula just tastes good to me. 

Good to know about the tobasco scorpion, i've stuck mostly with their chipotle cuz its the only thing iv'e had that doesnt just taste like vinegar and black pepper as you mentioned.

I'm fermenting some thai red chiles right now for my hot sauce.

No vinegar,  just salt, onions, garlilc, chiles and sugar.  Some brewers yeast to  get it started.

There is a local eatery here that makes their own habanero sauce. Really good! It is pleasantly non-life threatening, more flavor than heat. My wife still thinks I'm crazy when I ask for it, though.

Last edited by mneeley490

Dumpster dive!

Currently in my fridge:

Cholula

Nando’s Hot Peri-Peri

Trader Joe’s Harissa

Huy Fong Sriracha

Marie Sharp’s Fiery Habanero Pepper Sauce

 

 

Trader Joe’s Harissa

Trader Joe Sriracha

Huy Fong Sriracha

Arizona Gunslinger

Matouks Hot Pepper Sauce - always a favorite

I need to check the house - we received one as a present that has been one of the best - but I never noticed the brand

jcocktosten posted:

Trader Joe’s Harissa

Trader Joe Sriracha

Huy Fong Sriracha

Arizona Gunslinger

Matouks Hot Pepper Sauce - always a favorite

I need to check the house - we received one as a present that has been one of the best - but I never noticed the brand

We probably also have some left over kosher for passover Schug lying around

Ok, you made me look. 

Frank's  (for hot wings)

Cholula  (for most everything else)

Sambal Oelek  (love this on grilled steak)

No bullshit. Are you suggesting I bring a bottle with me next week? Are you a hot sauce fiend who puts it on steak?

Susie's Hot Sauce - Original (from Antigua and one of the best on egg hot sauces I've ever had)

Cholula for all the previously stated reasons. 

steve8 posted:

No bullshit. Are you suggesting I bring a bottle with me next week? Are you a hot sauce fiend who puts it on steak?

Yes and no!

Just made a hot suace this past weekend that was great

 

1 lb of dried ancho chiles
1 lb of dried chipotle
1 lb of ripe tomatoes
1 large onion
1 tsp of cumin
1 tsp of cardamon
2 star anise
1/4 cup of orange juice
salt to taste (usually more salt since its a sauce)

cut the tops off the dried chiles and get the seeds out. Soak in water to rehydrate

Put down some oil, i use olive, get the spices fragrant.
Brown the onions then add diced tomatoes and salt lightly.
Once slightly reduced, the peppers should be rehydrated.

Insert everything into a blender with the OJ and use 1 cup of the rehydrating water for liquid.

Blend to desired consistency. Salt to taste. Put on stove top and reduce out the liquid.

 

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