My understanding is that, in Parisian French, a consonant at the end of a word is typically not pronounced. So, "Moet" by itself would be "Mo-eh". However, the proper name of the wine is "Moet et Chandon", which becomes "Mo-et eh Shan-don" (with the last "n" essentially suppressed to conform with the general rule above).

This is a general rule only and there are apparently regional variations particularly in the South e.g. I have been told that it is appropriate to sound the last "s" on "Gigondas".
quote:
Originally posted by ffrp:
My understanding is that, in Parisian French, a consonant at the end of a word is typically not pronounced. So, "Moet" by itself would be "Mo-eh". However, the proper name of the wine is "Moet et Chandon", which becomes "Mo-et eh Shan-don" (with the last "n" essentially suppressed to conform with the general rule above).

This is a general rule only and there are apparently regional variations particularly in the South e.g. I have been told that it is appropriate to sound the last "s" on "Gigondas".


Two reasons why Moët is pronounced with a 't'.

1. It is followed by 'et'
2. It's a German name (note the umlaut), not French.
quote:
Originally posted by KillerB:


Two reasons why Moët is pronounced with a 't'.

1. It is followed by 'et'
2. It's a German name (note the umlaut), not French.


Germans don't ever use an umlaut over an 'e', only a, o and u...at least as far as I'm aware.

French (and other languages) use the two dots not as an umlaut, but what's called a dieresis; indicating that the vowel is to be pronounced separately from the one immediately preceding.

As for how it's pronounced, I don't speak French, but always assumed it was "moe-ay"
quote:
Originally posted by gthom:
quote:
Originally posted by KillerB:


Two reasons why Moët is pronounced with a 't'.

1. It is followed by 'et'
2. It's a German name (note the umlaut), not French.


Germans don't ever use an umlaut over an 'e', only a, o and u...at least as far as I'm aware.

French (and other languages) use the two dots not as an umlaut, but what's called a dieresis; indicating that the vowel is to be pronounced separately from the one immediately preceding.

As for how it's pronounced, I don't speak French, but always assumed it was "moe-ay"


In which case I have to give my lying toad of a brother a good kicking.
Thats the first time I hear about Moet & Chandon and their german roots. Honestly, the french will probably torture you if you tell them.

In german language we have the following "Umlaute":
Ö
Ä
Ü
Nothing more, nothing less.If you want to tipe the Umlaut just use OE, AE or UE.

Beleave me: Moet is truly french. But Krug has german roots eg.
Not german. Claude Moet was French alright.
I guess the "umlaut" or whatever you want to call it is something very 18th century-ish.
There's no need for it, while the "oe" doesn't exist in French.
There's no dieresis in Citroen either.

You can pronounce the end-t or drop it, there's no real rule.
Further to the south, the French will pronounce almost everything and even add a few consonants here and there.
If you decide not to pronounce the "t" though, don't go the "ay"-way. The end sound does not go up like in "way", it stops at the -èh.
The -ay being so disgustingly anglosaxon...

How Freddy Mercurey, may god rests his soul, becomes a linguisticus all of a sudden seems a bit odd to me. Or the late Bellucci for that matter.

Meanwhile there's no secret about the German influences in Champagne. It's not only Krug. How about Roederer itself, or Heidsick, Bollinger, Taittinger...
And please note that Vranken has flemish roots.

The pronunciation of veuve cliquot on stratsplace.com is clearly done by a french guy, and it's perfect.
Concerning Roederer, 'm not quite sure, I've always pronounced it the german way.
The "oe" is similar to the "ea" in learn, but taken to the front of the mouth. The last "er" in my opinion is pronounced like that in teacher, but the French may want to pronounce it more like "air", I guess.

And finally, about Ste-Michelle.
It's an American winery, so go ahead...

But when it comes to french wineries, keep in mind that Michelle is a girl. Thus: Sainte (Ste for short), closer to the "saynt" but pronounced with a nose cold.
MOE-ET Philistines!
MOE-ET!
What are you? American or something? ;-)
Twats! I suppose you "hate merlot" - and stuff.
bunch of gob****es the lot of you.

ah, only kidding, I'm Scottish, we swear a lot here and insult everyone, especially morons!
ha ha, only kidding again...
Ooh what a tricky prankster I am!
- ArieS

They must have been there all the time, but maybe hiding for me or something.
In any case they should not have been there. There's no point.
André Citroën was of Dutch decent. And citroen, in Dutch, means lemon. Without any dots.

- Matthk

Maybe spend some f00ckin' time in f00ckin Doblin and learn some bl00dy serious swearing. Only kidding...

- Vinomiko

The natives (the lord of the château) will pronounce the s.
Further nord (e.g. Paris) they will probably drop the end-s.
Pronounce it, it shows you're a wine educated person.
And you may just as well pronounce the s in estournel too.
quote:
Originally posted by Rik:
- ArieS

They must have been there all the time, but maybe hiding for me or something.
In any case they should not have been there. There's no point.
André Citroën was of Dutch decent. And citroen, in Dutch, means lemon. Without any dots.

- Matthk

Maybe spend some f00ckin' time in f00ckin Doblin and learn some bl00dy serious swearing. Only kidding...

- Vinomiko

The natives (the lord of the château) will pronounce the s.
Further nord (e.g. Paris) they will probably drop the end-s.
Pronounce it, it shows you're a wine educated person.
And you may just as well pronounce the s in estournel too.


Maybe I wasn't very clear initially in my post. This is how I believe it should be said, as this is how they pronounced it at the Chateau when I was there last summer.

Cose Day-tornel

The S in Cos is heard but not in D'Estournel. As well the l is also heard at the end of D'Estournel.

Jason
In high school French, they taught us that the consonants pronounced at the end of French words were the ones in CaReFuL. (Though those French R's are not at all the same as ours at the end of a word. And they all get pronounced when followed by a vowel.) Good luck accounting for local dialects, though you'd think the locals would know.

And as for the diaresis over the E in French (don't know how to type it here), surely you've all seen it in your Christmas cards? (Noel, often with the dots.)
Bonne chance with the French R, even in a state that lets the bons temps rouler (and let that R roll with it).
It's a remarcable rule that Careful one... The end-r of infinitives would have been one of the exceptions then.

Furtherrrrmore, pronunciation of French consonants goes beyond local dialects, it's more a thing of the north vs the south.

The diaresis, you're right, sometimes it's there, sometimes it isn't...
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Diesel:
Can anyone spell out the correct way of saying these terms?

Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin
Moet
Roederer

Much thanks!


Just wanted to reply with a comprehensive response to your post. Seems a few of the responses aren't particularly accurate or complete.

Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin
"Vuhv (the vowel is similar to the 'o' sound in the word 'book') Klee-koh Poh(n)-sah(r)-deh(n)" -The parentheticals are sort of implied consonants which, depending on who you ask, are not generally pronounced.

Moet
"Moh-eht" -This one is an exception to the rules of French pronunciation where the 't' is actually pronounced.

Roederer
"Reh-der-er" -The first syllable in this one is pronounced by saying the 'eh' vowel at the front of the mouth with lips slightly pursed.
quote:
Originally posted by Rik:
I think the only sollution is that the entire world turns to English.
Gone Chinese, Russian and Hurdu. And French.
It's really no use to teach you anglosaxons any other language.

Vuhv as the "o" in "book". Oh, come on.


Hmm...didn't think I was that far off. I'm fairly fluent, so unless your pronunciation of book (my example) is very different than mine, I think it's a viable example.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×